Category Archives: RANKINGS

Use Education to Inspire Change and Impact Lives, TSU Commence Speaker Tells More Than 700 Graduates

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – “As TSU degree holders, you have been equipped with a high-quality education and the power to make a substantive change in the lives of people in your community and the world,” Dr. Shawn Joseph, a longtime educator, told the fall graduating class at Tennessee State University Saturday.

Joseph, director of Metro Nashville Public Schools, reminded the graduates of the role TSU students played to bring about social justice and change in Nashville and across the nation during the civil rights movement.

President Glover accompanies commencement speaker, Dr. Shawn Joseph, during the procession in Gentry Complex. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“It was only 58 years ago that brave students, who walked the same halls you have walked on this sacred land, strived to create a more just and equitable America.” Joseph said. “Those students, equipped with the same degree that you are earning today, understood that their lives had a purpose.”

At the commencement ceremony in the Gentry Complex, more than 700 received degrees in various disciplines. They included members of the inaugural class of the TSU Executive MBA program.

In her welcome remarks, TSU President Glenda Glover thanked Joseph for agreeing to be the fall commencement speaker, and congratulated the graduates for their accomplishments.

“You have endured and prepared yourselves to reach this goal which may have seemed unattainable, but you stuck with it,” Glover said. “You must always remember that you did not accomplish this goal all by yourselves. There were parents, relatives, friends and mentors who helped you along the way. Remember to thank them.”

More than 700 graduates received degrees in various disciplines. (Photo by Lalita Hodge, TSU Media Relations)

In his speech, Joseph told the graduates that to be leaders for social justice, they must never be afraid to advocate for what is right, learn to persevere and be resilient, and remember that leaders serve people and purpose.

“Certainly, earning a degree is about educating yourself, and it is also about recognizing that you have a responsibility to help things go right for others,” Joseph said. “ Remember excellence comes from within, not from what you have. TSU has prepared you to find strength through your faith, your family, your friends and you can push forward. It’s not what people call you it’s what you answer to.”

Kelley Williams, a Nashville native, who received a bachelor’s degree in social work with high honors, said she was inspired by Joseph’s speech.

Undergraduate honorees celebrate by moving their tassels from right to  left  indicating their graduation from college. (Photo by Ramona Whitworth-Wiggins)

“I listened to every word keenly and especially what he said about the quality of a TSU degree,” said Williams, who plans on returning to TSU to pursue her master’s degree. “I love TSU and I am glad I came.”

Anthony Moreland, from Knoxville, Tennessee, who received his bachelor’s degree in biology, also with high honors, agreed with Williams on earning a TSU degree.

“Graduating today is a great accomplishment,” said Moreland, whose twin sister graduated from TSU a semester ahead of him. “Graduating for me is a big deal not only because I had to catch up with my sister but because I had a lot of family members who came here and did very well.”

Moreland plans on going to medical school, with Meharry Medical College his top choice.

NOTE: Featured photo by Ramona Whitworth-Wiggins

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Highly Sought-after Freshman Says Coming to Tennessee State University Changed His World

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Emmanuel Wallace had several colleges on his radar. But the top high school graduate from Memphis says a summer program he participated in at Tennessee State University changed his world, and he had no choice but to become a Big Blue Tiger.

“What brought me to TSU was my experience in a five-week Summer Apprenticeship Program that really opened my eyes to a lot of opportunities in agriculture,” says Wallace, a graduate of East High School, where he was a “distinguished honor roll” student and a student ambassador. With an expressed interest in studying civil engineering, Wallace received full scholarship offers from Vanderbilt University and the University of Memphis, just a few of the schools courting him.

Emmanuel Wallace

“First, I was considering majoring in civil engineering, because in high school I did a lot of engineering programs,” says Wallace, now a freshman at TSU. “But after talking with the leaders of the program, I concluded that agriculture would be a good fit for me.”

Over the summer, Wallace was one of 21 graduating high school seniors from across the nation who participated in the very competitive five-week Summer Apprenticeship Program. From studies in understanding hypersensitive response of tobacco plants to comparing DNAs in chickens and Guinea fowls, participants in the program were exposed to real-world scientific work and cutting-edge research. He developed a special interest in goat research after spending time with renowned TSU goat researcher, Dr. Richard Browning.

Wallace’s professors and mentors in the program say he showed remarkable ability and enthusiasm to learn.

“Right away we noticed how bright and energetic he was and really wanted to learn,” says Dr. DeEtra Young, assistant professor of agricultural and environmental sciences. “So through our mentorship, I think he fell in love with the new opportunities that agriculture provides.”

Wallace, a first-generation college student and the youngest of three children, came to TSU with a near 4.0 grade point average. He was the salutatorian of his graduating class, president of the National Honor Society, the senior class, and manager for the varsity boys’ soccer team at East High. He is currently majoring in agricultural sciences with a concentration in agribusiness. He hopes to go to graduate school and either work for the U.S. Department Agriculture or develop a business career in agribusiness.

Wallace was recruited as a High Achiever Academic Scholarship recipient. He is a Dean Scholar in the College of Agriculture, and a member of the Honors College. He also has memberships in the Tennessee Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation, and Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Science.

Recently, Wallace was one of 10 TSU students selected to participate in a three-day Agriculture Future of America four-track program in Kansas City, Missouri, designed to offer college men and women four different personal and professional development opportunities matched to their year in college.

According to Young, who accompanied the students, Wallace participated in Track I, which is the leadership track for freshmen.

“The program bridges the gap between academic, leadership and work experiences while helping students understand the impact of their decisions,” says Young.

At TSU, Wallace says his goal is to combine academic and leadership for student success.

“I plan on holding multiple leadership positions, inspire and motivate members of my class, and become a student ambassador for Tennessee State University,” he says.

For more information on opportunities in the TSU College of Agriculture, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/agriculture/seminar_schedule.aspx.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU’s Glover Receives Thurgood Marshall College Fund Education Leadership Award, HBCU President of the Year

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover has received the prestigious Thurgood Marshall College Fund Education Leadership Award as the HBCU President of the Year.

The award was presented to Glover at the TMCF’s 31st Anniversary Awards Gala in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 29.

It recognizes Dr. Glover’s commitment to Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and  her bold leadership and achievements in higher education.

“I’m extremely humbled and thankful to the Thurgood Marshall College Fund for selecting me as the 2018 Education Leadership Award recipient,” Glover said.

“This award is an honor that represents the bright and talented students enrolled at TSU, our leaders of tomorrow, as well as the dedicated faculty and staff committed to nurturing and inspiring them.”

Glover was among three distinguished individuals who were honored at this year’s TMCF awards gala.

Emmanuel Wallace, a freshman, agricultural sciences major from Memphis, Tennessee, is a recipient of the TMCF scholarship. He is grateful for the support and for the recognition being bestowed on Dr. Glover.

“It makes me feel important that our president is receiving this outstanding award from the Thurgood Marshall College Fund,” Wallace said, upon hearing that Glover had been selected for the award. “It shows that we are a school that is all about education and excellence.”

Sophomore Jailen Leavell, who was recently named a White House Initiative 2018 HBCU Competitiveness Scholar for academics and leadership, echoed the same sentiments. He touted Dr. Glover’s continued hard work to make sure students are successful.

“After hearing the announcement from the leader of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund that President Glover won the highest award from the organization, it filled me with pride to know that she is my university president,” Leavell said.

“Beyond pride, it inspired me to continue putting my best foot forward in academics and extracurricular activities, to be the greatest student just like she was while attending our university.”

The TMCF has had a long relationship with Tennessee State University and President Glover, through scholarships and programs geared toward student success.

On Oct. 22, the head of TMCF, Dr. Harry Williams, visited TSU to meet with Glover, senior administration officials, and to see firsthand the impact the organization is having with students participating in its program.

Williams noted that TSU was the 27th HBCU he has visited in the last nine months. TMCF represents 47 HBCUs and raised over $300 million for them. He said 97 percent of students who receive scholarships graduate, which is attractive to employers.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

For more information about TMCF, visit: www.tmcf.org.

Hundreds Attend Fall Preview Day at TSU, several admitted on the spot

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tywan Corbitt, Jr., and Martez Cuff II have been friends since kindergarten. The two Dayton, Ohio natives have kept their close bond and encouraged each other through middle school and are now graduating seniors at Chaminade Julienne Catholic High School.

They also have plans for college, the same college.

“We are coming to Tennessee State University,” Corbitt and Cuff said in unison, as their patents listened with apparent excitement.

Tywan Corbitt, Jr., and Martez Cuff II, have been admitted to TSU for the 2019-2020 academic year. They attended Fall Preview Day with their parents. From left are: Angie Christian, Martez Cuff’s mother; Martez; Tywan, and his father, Tywan Corbitt, Sr. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The two young men were among nearly 700 high school juniors and seniors who on Saturday attended Fall Preview Day, commonly called Big Blue Explosion at TSU. Organizers said participants came from more than 15 states, including California, Michigan, Texas, Illinois and Wisconsin to learn about the university’s offerings and admission processes.

Like Corbitt and Cuff, who will major in electrical engineering and physical therapy, respectively, organizers said several students were admitted on the spot for the 2019-2020 academic year. One of them was Alani Maiden of Little Rock, Arkansas, who proudly displayed her certificate of admission as she toured the campus.

“I chose TSU because it is a highly accredited HBCU, where I know I will feel more at home,” said Maiden, a senior at Little Rock Central High School, who wants to major in nursing. “I chose TSU because it is in Nashville, an up-and-coming city. And I can see myself not only going to school in Nashville, but also living in Nashville.”

Organizers say nearly 700 high school juniors and seniors and their parents attended Fall Preview Day. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Admissions and university officials said they were very excited about the turnout at this year’s Big Blue Explosion.

“We had an awesome and exciting Fall Preview Day,” said Dr. John Cade, Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Success. “We admitted on the spot about 30 students. So we are excited about the fact that we have already started our trajectory with respect to building enrollment for the upcoming 2019-2020 academic year.”

Also excited was Anwar Turner, a TSU 2010 graduate and former drum major with the Aristocrat of Bands, whose son, Jordan, was among those admitted.

Alani Maiden, a senior from Little Rock Central High School, was one of those admitted on the spot at Fall Preview Day. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“I am absolutely excited. He has grown up in this environment like I have,” said Anwar. “I was in the band. I would bring him to football games. My family is from here. So my family and I are very excited that he’s coming here.”

Jordan, whose goal is to go into film production, wants to major in mass communications.

“I am very excited. This is where I want to go to college. I can’t wait to start,” said Jordan. “My parents have been here. My grandparents have been here. I have just been around this campus my whole life. I have been to the games; I have seen the band play. I got TSU blood in me.”

Anwar Turner, a 2010 TSU graduate and former drum major, says he is excited his son, Jordan, has been admitted to his alma mater. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Corbitt and Cuff plan to maintain their bond, and believe leaving home will not change or take them away from their goal of a quality college education.

“TSU is a great school. I have family down here. My father went to an HBCU, so it makes it all the more interesting,” said Corbitt.

“I am sure we will make it. We will encourage each other and keep each other focused,” Cuff added.

Organizers said activities for the visitors also included meetings with academic departments, TSU student organizations, campus tours, and other forms of educational entertainment.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

2018 Fall Career Fair Opens Doors to Internships, Employment for TSU Students; Record Number Attend

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University students looking for internships, full-time employment and co-op opportunities got a major break on Wednesday. More than 130 companies and potential employers converged on the main campus for the 2018 Fall Career Fair.

Representatives from government agencies, aerospace, engineering, healthcare and the entertainment industries set up tents, tables and displays in the Gentry Center Complex to network with students about career and potential employment opportunities.

Organizers said nearly 400 students attended the all-day fair.

Anthony Wadsworth, a senior electrical engineering major, right, talks to Boeing representatives about internship opportunity. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

India Brown, a junior sociology major with public health concentration, and Anthony Wadsworth, a senior electrical engineering major, were among the first students at the fair. They were both looking for internships.

“I am looking for something that’s in the health field, dealing with social work,” said Brown, a Memphis native, as she filled in an application form with Tennessee Family Solutions, Inc., a direct support group dedicated to people with special needs.

For Wadsworth, who was networking at the Boeing table, he was following up on a previous meeting with Boeing representatives in Washington, D.C, last summer. He is seeking his first internship.

Within minutes of arriving at the career fair, India Brown, seeking internship opportunity in the healthcare industry, was already filling out an application. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“I spoke with them at the Black Engineer of the Year Awards ceremony in Washington last summer. They directed me to the right place and I am just here to follow up,” said Wadsworth, who is from Nashville.

He may just be in luck. Boeing representatives said they were “quite” impressed with the quality and preparedness of the TSU students at the fair.

“We see a great potential here among these students,” said Edward H. Gerding, vice president and senior chief engineer for structure and mechanical systems at Boeing. “We are actually looking across the board. We are growing in all aspects of our business between engineering, supply chain and business. We are looking for engineers and people in varieties of specialties, and now is the perfect time for students that are searching for internships.”

Like Boeing, representatives from the CIA, FedEx, NASA, Regions Bank and several other corporations and employers said TSU students – dressed in dark business suits and black shoes – were very impressive in appearance, approach and presentation.

Corey L. Harrell, left, a 2001 TSU graduate now working for NASA, returns to his alma mater as a recruiter for NASA. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“We do a lot of work in terms of preparation,” said Charles Jennings, director of the TSU Career Development Center, which organized the fair. “Last week and up to yesterday, we spent time getting them ready for interviews. I see that it shows, because a lot of the employers are talking about the great turnout and how ready our students are.”

Jennings also attributed the success of the fair and the preparedness of students to the mentorship provided by alumni of the career center, many of whom returned not only as recruiters for their various companies, but also to help their younger protégés prepare for the real world.

“It is just nice to see them giving back to their institution,” Jennings said.

Nearly 30 TSU graduates who got their career start with companies through the Career Development Center, attended the fair as recruiters for their companies and to mentor their younger proteges. (Photo by Jamal Coleman, TSU Career Development Center)

In all, nearly 30 TSU graduates, who got their career start with companies through the Career Development Center, were seen sporting shirts with Alumni on a TSU blue patch affixed to the chest. One of them was Corey L. Harrell, NASA SMA engines branch chief at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

He said coming back to TSU as a “proud alum” means a lot to him. “Anytime I can get a chance to come back I always do it,” said Harrell, who has returned several times to mentor and participate in the career fair. “

For more information on future career fairs or the TSU Career Development Center, to http://www.tnstate.edu/careers/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU High Achieving Freshman Sets Sight on National Exposure, Engineering Entrepreneurship

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Kennedy Marie McCurry is aiming high. The incoming freshman wants to be known as one of the best softball players of all time, and to own an architectural engineering firm. She believes TSU is the best place to prepare her for success.

“My goal in life is to eventually play in the National Pro Fastpitch League for a couple years and then move on to owning my own architectural firm,” says McCurry, an architectural engineering major, who will play softball for TSU.

Kennedy Marie McCurry

A Gallatin, Tennessee, native, McCurry says she is no stranger to TSU. Her father, Dr. Charles McCurry, is a longtime professor of electrical engineering at the university.

“I have been around TSU almost all my life,” says the 18-year-old. “My dad was a really strong influence on me. He really pushed me toward TSU. Also, I really like the softball team, and I always knew I wanted to do something in architectural engineering. And I know that TSU has a very strong engineering program. So all signs pointed toward TSU.”

Kennedy comes to TSU with outstanding academic and athletic credentials. She enters the university with a near 3.7 grade point average, and 28 on the ACT.  At Beech High School, where she graduated last May, she was a star player on the softball team. She was twice named to the All-District Team, she made the district tournament team and earned MVP. She played on the Middle Tennessee All-State Team her sophomore year, and was named to the MaxPreps All-American Second Team her senior year.

“I have always wanted to play D-I softball. I am proud to bring my educational and athletic skills to TSU,” she says. “I chose to attend Tennessee State University because of its rich heritage, sports legacy and nationally ranked College of Engineering.”

Kennedy could not have chosen TSU at a better time. She is among a new recruit of high achievers the university targets to attract the best and brightest students, since TSU raised its admission standards about two years ago.

Saying, “TSU is no longer a school of last resort,” President Glenda Glover in 2016 announced sweeping changes that raised admission standards to attract better students. Minimum requirements for incoming freshmen went up from a 2.25 GPA to 2.5, while the ACT score remained at 19.

““Excellence remains our top priority, but we can’t be the school of last resort,” Glover said.

For Kennedy, she says TSU’s emphasis on producing well-rounded students was another attraction.

“TSU had already laid the foundation to help me get a quality education by engaging me in activities to prepare me for my college work even before classes started,” she says.

Last summer, Kennedy was among 11 high school graduating seniors who participated in the Engineering Concepts Institute in the College of Engineering at TSU. ECI is a four-week pre-college, residential program intended to prepare participants for academic success in the mathematical sciences or engineering disciplines.

“ECI also helped me to make new friends. I am excited and looking forward to the many more accomplishments I plan to have at TSU,” says Kennedy.

For more information on the engineering program at TSU, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/engineering/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Welcomes Class of 2022 at Freshman Convocation

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University Friday welcomed first-year students during the 2018 freshman convocation.

More than 1,300 incoming freshman students were inducted during the ceremony in Kean Hall.

Incoming female freshmen were dressed in white for their induction. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“I am extremely proud to welcome you to Tennessee State University,” said President Glenda Glover. “It is my honor to stand before the Class of 2022 today, not only as your president, but as a fellow TSU Tiger. You have embarked on an incredible journey. I encourage you to do your best. Do not just strive to make an A, but strive to be an A.”

Porsha Hernandez, an economics and finance major from Nashville, said the induction ceremony made her feel at home.

“I have always been a very serious student and I plan to continue that here,” she said.

More than 1,300 first-year students were inducted during the 2018 Freshman Convocation. Male students wore white shirts and blue pants, sporting TSU-supplied blue ties. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Dr. John Cade, vice president for Enrollment and Student Success, presented the students for the induction.

“Madam President, it is my pleasure to present these young people who have satisfied all the requirements for admission to Tennessee State University as freshmen and students with advance standing,” Cade said.

With each student holding a lighted candle symbolizing “knowledge and truth,” they took the TSU Freshman Pledge, administered by the interim Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Alisa Mosley.

Females were dressed in white and males in white shirts and blue pants, sporting TSU-supplied blue ties. They pledged to commit themselves “to serious intellectual and cultural efforts” and to deport themselves “with honor and dignity to become better prepared to live a full and useful life in society.”

Trinity Young, a math major from Indianapolis, said he took the pledge very seriously.

“I am committed to being a very good student in all areas for as long as I am here,” Young said.

In addition to student representatives, speakers at the convocation included Joni McReynolds, president of the TSU National Alumni Association.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Admissions Staff, Deans Engage MNPS Guidance Counselors About Offerings and Programs at the University

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – As a new school year begins, deans, admissions officials and staff are spreading the word about the quality educational opportunities at Tennessee State University.

On July 25, more than 90 Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools guidance counselors gathered at TSU for a training day. TSU officials used the opportunity to remind the counselors about the affordable cost of education at the University. They talked about programs and offerings, internship and study-abroad opportunities, that nearly 85 percent of students get employment immediately after graduation, and that a high number of graduates are accepted in graduate schools.

Participants at the MNPS training workshop visit displays of paraphernalia from the various TSU colleges. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

For the last eight years, MNPS has partnered with TSU to host the (elementary through high school) guidance counselors during their one-day annual workshop and training that precedes the opening of schools early next month.

Since the counselors serve as a direct link between their schools and the university, the goal is to encourage them to steer their students and potential graduates toward post-secondary education at TSU, said Terrence Izzard, associate vice president for Enrollment Management and Student Success.

“We offer an affordable, quality education that prepares our students with the necessary skills and competencies to be successful,” Izzard said. “We offer disciplines that prepare students to be global leaders, to impact the world and to be successful in their careers of choice.”

Izzard’s remarks were followed by deans of the various colleges, who gave brief remarks on the uniqueness of their offerings and programs.

Dr. Gloria Johnson, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts, talks to guidance counselors about programs and offerings in her college. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“We want your students,” said Dr. Gloria Johnson, dean of the College of Liberal Arts. “We want students who are creative, inquisitive, and students who are not sure what they want but have big dreams, because we can help them work that out.”

Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College of Engineering, and Dr. Lonnie Sharpe, dean of the College of Life and Physical Sciences, talked about the “unique” STEM programs and research opportunities available to students who are interested in the sciences.

“A great number of students we have in our college come from the Nashville community; we want you to work with us to bring on board more of those students,” said Sharpe. “As a student in our college, you get a lot of great opportunities, including international research experiences, where students get involved in research in a prestigious foreign institution. They get a chance to study, research and come back and present their research here at home.”

Presentations were also made by the deans of the colleges of Agriculture, Business, Education, Health Sciences, and the Honors College.

According to Dr. Gregory Clark, director of High School Relations and NCAA Certification, nearly 21 percent of TSU’s enrollment comes from Metropolitan Nashville Public High Schools.

“We want to remind these guidance counselors that TSU is Nashville’s university,” said Clark. “We need all of their students. We provide all the programs that millennial students need. Many of these counselors have furthered their education at TSU, which is a testament to the quality of our programs.”

Ursula Reed, a guidance counselor at Martin Luther King Magnet High School, says her TSU preparation gave her a strong foundation. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Ursula Reed is a guidance counselor at Martin Luther King Magnet High School. She holds a bachelor’s degree in family and consumer science, and a master’s degree in school counseling, both from TSU.

She said the preparation she received from TSU gave her a strong foundation as a “young professional.”

“This is where I received what has prepared me to be a productive school counselor,” said Reed, who has been a counselor since receiving her graduate degree in 2007. “I talk to students about TSU. A good number of students from MLK come each year to TSU.”

TSU admissions staff and deans presented at the guidance counselors’ workshop on Wednesday. Pictured are, from left, Dr. Gregory Clark, Director of High School Relations and NCAA Certification; Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, Dean of the College of Engineering; Erynne Davis, Director of Digital Media; and Terrence Izzard, Associate Vice President of Enrollment Management and Student Success. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Dr. Megan Cusson-Lark, MNPS executive director of School Counseling, said she appreciates the partnership between TSU and metro schools.

“We enjoy being on campus and finding out additional information about various departments at the university,” Cusson-Lark said. “Our partnership has grown to where for the second straight year we will hold our college fair together with TSU at the Gentry Complex (in September). We are really appreciative and thankful for the partnership and we are excited that it has grown.”

In addition to student recruitment, teacher recruitment is another link between TSU and Metro Schools. The University remains a key pipeline to recruiting Metro and area teachers.  Recent reports show that for the past five years, TSU has been one of the top teacher preparation programs in the state, providing exceptionally qualified candidates for teaching positions, not only across Tennessee and the southern region, but right here in the university’s backyard with MNPS.

 

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

 

TSU receives $20,000 in Scholarship funds in honor of Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover as 30th International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated

By Kelli Sharpe

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University has begun to reap the benefits of its president’s dual role of leadership for the university and as international president of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated. Dr. Glenda Glover was presented a $20,000 check for the Glenda Baskin Glover-Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated 30th International President Scholarship fund at TSU during her installation activities in Houston, Texas.

The scholarship was established to celebrate Glover taking the helm of AKA, the nation’s oldest African American female Greek-lettered service organization, and to highlight her role as TSU’s first female president.

“I am so grateful to the members of our great sisterhood that work at Tennessee State, along with the current and former members of our Alpha Psi Undergraduate chapter for creating this scholarship fund for deserving students here at the university,” said TSU President Glenda Glover.

“The generous donations from sorority members for the scholarship fund align with Alpha Kappa Alpha’s new initiative HBCU for Life: A Call to Action. I’ve charged chapters to donate $10 million to these institutions over the next four years. Of course this is personal for me as the president and alumna of an HBCU. HBCUs are an essential part of this country’s DNA. The new leadership of AKA is committed to the sustainability of all our HBCUs.”

Dr. Glover donated $50,000 to the AKA Educational Advancement Foundation for the sorority’s HBCU initiative during her installation ceremony. She made that same commitment of a $50,000 donation to TSU when she became president of the university in 2013.

Glover’s theme for the next four years, 2018-2022, with AKA is “Exemplifying Excellence Through Sustainable Service.” She will lead the prestigious 110-year old organization, of nearly 300,000 members and over 1,000 chapters located throughout the world, with a platform comprised of five program targets, a signature program and seven international community service impact days designed to advance AKA and underscore the organization’s commitment to service.

Target 1: HBCU for Life: A Call to Action. We will continue our emphasis on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). We will promote and market HBCUs, encourage students to attend HBCUs, and provide financial support to HBCUs.

Target 2: Women’s Healthcare and Wellness. We will raise community awareness about critical health issues impacting the quality and longevity of the lives of African-American women. The primary focuses will be Breast Cancer Awareness and Prevention, Heart Health, Nutrition and Wellness, and Care for the Caregivers.

Target 3: Building Your Economic Legacy. We will emphasize financial planning, asset accumulation, and wealth building including savings and investment, managing debt, and improving credit. We also will focus on supporting and encouraging African-American businesses through entrepreneurship and “The Black Dollar 365,” where we will be intentional in patronizing African-American businesses all year long.

Target 4: The Arts! We will expose students to arts enrichment and culture by focusing on the arts and celebrating the contributions of African-American artists. Program initiatives will showcase talent through the exploration of writers, entertainers and various other visual and performing artists and media.

Target 5: Global Impact. Through global partnerships, we will collaborate with organizations that provide assistance in international areas populated with people of color, including supporting organizations engaged in initiatives that assist refugees and their families integrate into American life.

Signature Program, #CAPSM, which is the abbreviation for the College Admissions Process, focuses on motivating and assisting students through the college entry process. It is a hands-on approach designed to facilitate college admission from researching various institutions and submitting applications through the completion of the enrollment process.

A native of Memphis, Tennessee, Glover’s higher educational development began as a student at TSU where she earned a bachelor’s degree in mathematics with honors. She earned her Master of Business Administration Degree in accounting at Clark Atlanta University and her Doctor of Philosophy in business and economics business from George Washington University. Glover earned her Juris Doctor Degree from Georgetown University Law Center. She is a certified public accountant, a licensed attorney, and one of a handful of African-American women to hold the Ph.D.-CPA-J.D. combination in the United States.

Professionally, Glover has amassed over 25 years of success in the academic and business arenas. Since assuming the leadership helm at TSU in 2013, the University has attained increases in academic program offerings, corporate and community partnerships, as well as alumni giving. While dean of the College of Business at Jackson State University from 1994 to 2012, Glover led the college through the accreditation process and spearheaded the implementation of the nation’s first Ph.D. program in business at a HBCU. From 1990 to 1994 Glover served as the chairperson of the Department of Accounting at the Howard University School of Business. She has also served as Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of an engineering firm, a tax manager at a major public utility company, and an accountant with a Big-Four CPA firm.

Glover was initiated into the Alpha Psi Chapter at TSU in 1971. A committed life member of AKA with over four decades of leadership and service, Glover has served in several capacities, including International Vice-President, International Treasurer, and Treasurer to the Educational Advancement Foundation. She also has served as president, vice-president, and treasurer of Beta Delta Omega Chapter in Jackson, Mississippi, and as president and vice-president of Alpha Psi Chapter as an undergraduate student.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Minnesota Native Says Quality Faculty and Beautiful Campus Attracted Her to TSU Graduate School

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University wasn’t on Jeff and Julie Palm’s radar when they initially made the 12-hour trek from Millville, Minnesota to Nashville, Tennessee. Their daughter Katie was looking to pursue her doctorate degree in physical therapy at one of the state’s premiere universities. However, after an unpleasant touring experience, the Palms found the perfect graduate school atmosphere for their daughter at TSU.

“When we did a tour down here a year and a half ago, it was Spring Break, and there were no students on campus. We talked to the office staff worker, and she took us to three different professors who were doing their work, and they were all like, ‘Oh, come on in and sit down,’ ” said Julie Palm, who works as a licensed practical nurse in Minnesota. “All three professors were just so nice and explained everything to us, and I think that is part of the reason we fell in love with TSU.”

Katie Palm

Katie Palm, who earned her bachelor of science degree in Health Sciences from the University of Minnesota Rochester, started her journey at TSU this summer. She said she loves the campus and is excited about being a TSU Tiger.

“I love the values that TSU has. At Rochester, there was an open door policy where students could approach a professor and ask them any question at any time, and the physical therapy program at TSU also has that open door policy,” she said. “That’s one of the things I’ve become accustomed to, and I’m glad they have that here.”

Dr. Alex Sekwat, associate dean of the Graduate School, said getting accepted into TSU’s DPT program in Physical Therapy is no small feat.

“The physical therapy program is a very competitive program. Gaining entrance to it is a little difficult because the demand is high,” said Sekwat. “Typically, in a given admissions cycle, the program attracts close to 300 applicants, and out of that only 36 are offered admissions. So it is very selective.”

Sekwat said the Ph.D. in Physical Therapy is just one of many advanced degrees offered by the Tennessee State University Graduate School.

“We provide diverse programming, ranging from health sciences, business, government, education, engineering, agriculture and liberal arts,” he said. “We have programs for any student who is looking for what is mainstream. Not to mention that we offer 24 master’s degree programs, seven doctoral degree programs, and up to eight graduate certificate programs.”

According to Sekwat, TSU offers a mixed-range of full-time programs for traditional students and non-traditional students who come part-time like working adults as well as students who can only attend classes online. He said new technology being implemented by the graduate school will provide upcoming students with a smoother application process.

“We are in the process of bringing on board a totally online application system, whereby there will be no paperwork involved,” Sekwat said. “With that we are hoping that beginning next semester, new students will have a completely different experience because everything will be at their fingertips. They won’t have to send us any paper. Everything will be processed online. Classes will be uploaded online, letters of recommendation online, statement of purpose online, test scores and so on. That is one of the most exciting things I see coming.”

Palm, who plans to stay in Tennessee after she earns her Ph.D., said she intends to use her expertise to eventually work with children. Her father, Jeff, who works as a machinist, said he is proud of Katie’s accomplishments, and they are excited about her attending the university.

“I am very proud of her just like my wife,” he said. “Katie excels in everything she does. She’s great with everything, and we are very supportive of her.”

For more information about the Tennessee State University Graduate School, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/graduate/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.