Category Archives: NEWS

“DREAMGIRLS” Comes to Tennessee State University Jan. 23-Feb. 2

Dreamgirls PosterNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The Broadway musical DREAMGIRLS makes its debut January 23 through February 2 at Tennessee State University, and tells the story of a make-believe, all-female group that makes it big in the 1960s and 1970s while facing the triumphs and tribulations that come with fame.

Presented by the Circle Players in collaboration with Tennessee State University, the play will take place at the Cox-Lewis Theatre in the Performing Arts Center.

Performances take place Thursdays through Saturdays at 7:30 p.m., with Sunday matinees on January 26 and February 2 at 3 p.m. A Saturday matinee takes place February 1 at 3 p.m.

Dreamgirls takes audience members to a time when rhythm and blues blended with other styles of popular music creating a new American sound…a time when music lovers were screaming at Elvis and listening to the Beatles, but were dancing to the new beat of countless groups like The Supremes, The Marvelettes, The Shirelles and The Temtations. Dreamgirls doesn’t just focus on singing, dancing and performing, but also the behind-the-scenes reality of the entertainment industry…the business part of show business that made possible this cultural phenomenon.

Dreamgirls has a memorable score that features R&B flavored songs, many of which may be familiar to audiences, especially the title song, Dreamgirls, and the powerful solo And I am Tellin’ You. The music, singing and choreography of Steppin to the Bad Side will have audiences tapping and clapping along.

The music direction is by Dianna Poe, former TSU Choir Director and voice instructor, and director of the Nashville Symphony MLK Celebration Choir. Choreography is by Ashley Danielle and Tim Larson, and also serves as production manager.

Ticket prices are $18 for adults, $15 for students and seniors 60 and older. Special discount tickets are available for $11 on Thursday, Jan. 30. Group rates are available for 10 or more by calling 615.332.7529 or boxoffice@circleplayers.net.

TSU student tickets are $5 and $10 for faculty and staff. Ticket discounts are available in person with campus ID at the Performing Arts Center box office prior to any performance.

For more information, call 615.332.7529.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

U.S. Deputy Secretary of Agriculture to Visit Tennessee State University Jan. 21

Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Krysta Harden
Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Krysta Harden

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The United States Deputy Secretary of Agriculture, Krysta Harden, will visit TSU on Tuesday, Jan. 21, during which she will meet with senior University officials, tour on-going USDA-funded projects, as well as hold talks with the dean, faculty and students in the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences.

According to a CAHNS release, representatives from several state and federal USDA agencies, including Tennessee Commissioner of Agriculture, Julius Johnson, and Tennessee Farm Bureau President, Lacy Upchurch are expected to accompany Harden.

As part of her visit, the Deputy Secretary will participate in a meet-and-greet with students, faculty, and stakeholders in the Ferrell-Westbrook Complex, and tour the new 25,000 square-foot state-of-the-art Agricultural Biotechnology Research Building in the College, the release said.

The visit will begin at 10:15 a.m., with a “Welcome and Introductions” reception in the Dean’s Conference Room in the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, followed by tour of the new research building, and the meet-and-greet and stakeholders’ meeting. See agenda below.

10:15 – 10:30 Welcome & Introductions (Dean’s Conference Room)

10:30 – 10:55 Tour of new Agricultural Biotechnology Research Building

11:00 – 11:30 Meet & Greet with students, stakeholders, and faculty (Ferrell-Westbrook Complex/Barn Auditorium)

11:45 – 12:15 Lunch & Conversation in President’s Dining Area

The Deputy Secretary’s visit Tuesday coincides with the kick-off of several activities in the college including the “Third Tuesday TSU Field Days and Educational Workshops,” featuring presentations, seminars, demonstrations, field visits, and hands-on activities from scientists, extension agents, and other helpful authorities on subjects related to food and agriculture.

The inaugural program on “Insect Control in the Field and the Home” will be held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Room 118 of the Farrell-Westbrook Complex.

An organic strawberry workshop, “Developing the Logistics for Producing Human Pathogens-Free Organic Strawberries in the State of Tennessee,” sponsored by Wal-Mart, Tennessee State University and the University of Arkansas, will take place simultaneously from 8:30 a.m. – noon in the Agricultural Industrial Technology Center Auditorium on the main campus.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Ag College to Begin “Third Tuesday” Workshop Series on Food, Agriculture

Pest ManagementNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences and the Cooperative Extension Program have announced a new series of informative workshops to be held on the third Tuesday of each month.

Called the “Third Tuesday TSU Field Days and Educational Workshops,” the series will feature presentations, seminars, demonstrations, field visits, and hands-on activities from scientists, extension agents, and other helpful authorities on subjects related to food and agriculture.

The inaugural program on “Insect Control in the Field and the Home” will be held on Tuesday, Jan. 21 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Room 118 of the Farrell-Westbrook Complex on the main campus.

Below are the schedule and titles for the remainder of 2014:

Feb. 18           “Pruning and Care for Fruit Trees and Small Fruits”

March 18       “Local Foods and Gardening Basics”

April 15          “Hive Splitting for Beekeepers”

May 20           “Goat Production and Local Meat Producers”

June 17          “On-farm or At-home Biodiesel Production”

Aug. 19           “Fall Vegetable Production Using High Tunnel Greenhouses”

Sept. 16          “Turf Establishment and Maintenance”

Oct. 21                “Eating for Wellness”

The times and locations for future workshops are to be announced prior to each session. However, all Third Tuesday TSU Field Days and Educational Workshops will be held at one of the following locations: Room 118 Farrell-Westbrook Complex (main campus), Nashville AREC (1521 Ed Temple Blvd., Nashville, TN), or the Ashland City AREC (3101 River Rd., Ashland City, TN).

Due to the Thanksgiving and winter holidays, no workshops will be held in November or December.

A $10 registration fee, including lunch, is required for each workshop. To register or request more information, please contact Dr. Jason de Koff at (615) 963-4929 or jdekoff@tnstate.edu, or go to www.tnstate.edu/agriculture.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover Joins Pinnacle Financial Partners Board

BIO_Cropped_NewNcopyWebDr.-Glenda-Glover-NASHVILLE, Tenn.Pinnacle Financial Partners announced recently that Tennessee State University President Glenda Baskin Glover, Ph.D., JD, CPA has been elected to its board.

She joins 12 other prominent business and community leaders who serve as Pinnacle directors.

“Glenda has a breadth of corporate experience, and her educational background in business, law and accounting makes her an extraordinarily valuable addition to our board,” said M. Terry Turner, Pinnacle’s president and chief executive officer. “We are extremely pleased to welcome her as a director and know that her experience will serve Pinnacle and our shareholders well.”

Dr. Glover is a certified public accountant, an attorney, and is one of two African American women to hold the Ph.D./CPA/JD combination in the nation.

She has served as TSU’s president since January 2013. Dr. Glover previously was the Dean of the College of Business at Jackson State University in Jackson, Miss., where she led the College of Business throughout the accreditation process and spearheaded the implementation of the nation’s only Ph.D. in Business at a historically black college and university.

Her other previous roles include serving as chairperson of the Department of Accounting at Howard University, chief financial officer of an engineering firm, tax manager at a major public utility company and accountant with a Big-Four CPA firm.

Dr. Glover has been a corporate board member of three other publicly traded corporations: Citigroup-Student Loan Corporation, American Learning Corporation and First Guaranty Bancshares. She served as either chair of the audit committee or as a financial expert on each board.

Dr. Glover is the author of more than 100 articles and papers and is regarded as one of the nation’s experts on corporate governance. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Tennessee State University, pursued an MBA at Clark Atlanta University and completed her doctorate in business from George Washington University. She later completed her law degree from Georgetown University.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

President Glover Addresses Faculty, Staff at Spring Institute

The University held its annual Spring Faculty-Staff Institute Jan. 9 when TSU President Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover (Center) shared her vision for the new semester and highlighted accomplishments from her first year in office. Also speaking at the institute were Dr. Veronica Oates (Left) Faculty Senate Chairperson, and Yvonne Sanders (Right) Staff Senate Chairperson. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
The University held its annual Spring Faculty-Staff Institute Jan. 9 when TSU President Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover (Center) shared her vision for the new semester and highlighted accomplishments from her first year in office. Also speaking at the institute were Dr. Veronica Oates (Left) Faculty Senate Chairperson, and Yvonne Sanders (Right) Staff Senate Chairperson. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – In an address punctuated by numerous applauses from faculty and staff, Tennessee State University President Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover shared her vision for the new semester today and highlighted accomplishments from her first year in office.

“It is an honor to serve the institution that gave me my start and I want to express my gratitude to each one of you for your support over the past year,” Dr. Glover told members of the University during the Faculty and Staff Institute to begin the spring semester.

Glover, who assumed the TSU presidency January 2013, highlighted the University successes from the past year by revisiting her five-point vision of Student Progress and Customer Service, Fund Raising and Partnerships, Diversity and Inclusion, Shared Governance and Community Outreach that she announced when she first took office.

While there were notable successes in each of the areas, she said, they continue to be a strategic blueprint for planning, overall growth and development of TSU.

“Our purpose at this University is educating, graduating and enhancing the lives of the students we touch,” she added. “Our one overriding objective is to meet the needs of all our students. The five goals foster an environment of all we do.”

Speaking on Student Progress and Customer Service, Dr. Glover touched on improvements in customer service, especially with registration and the financial aid process. While there is always room for improvement, she said, the process has improved in the short year, while student complaints are down.

“We have increased our efforts to streamline the enrollment process, and to educate and engage students and parents much earlier about financial aid resources and the required criteria, which have reduced confusion and complaints,” she added.

Student recruitment and retention were also highlighted, with the focus, she said, of turning toward a new recruitment plan, with a shift toward magnet schools and community colleges in Nashville, Memphis and Murfreesboro, Tenn.

“Not only are we reaching into new areas, we are also increasing our contact with potential students, and increasing our outreach to non-traditional students while promoting online learning,” she said.

Touching on student retention and graduation rates, Dr. Glover noted that the two areas need improvement. Since funding is tied directly to graduation rates, it must, she said, improve in the future.

“Our graduation and first-year retention rates are low and we must improve them since they are tied to funding,” she remarked. “First and foremost, we have an ethical obligation as a University to graduate students, and the two go hand-in-hand.”

Turning to fundraising, while the final figures are still being worked out, Dr. Glover announced that the University has received $2.77 million in cash contributions, with alumni giving more than tripling since 2012. Also notable, she continued, was corporate giving, with the number of donations from the business community climbing to 165 corporate partners.

“This shows that TSU is a viable business partner,” she said. “Corporations are seeing the talent we have at the University with corporations recruiting more on campus while we have seen an increase in academic and business partnerships.”

She also mentioned the value of recognizing diversity. While she acknowledged that TSU would always remain an HBCU, the expansion of racial and cultural groups is a top priority.

“We will always live up to the designation as an HBCU, and respect our past and our history,” she added. “At the same time, we must embrace diversity and ensure everyone has equal opportunity to a quality education. As Nashville’s only public institution, we are looking at ways to be more inclusive.”

Ending on community outreach, she thanked everyone in attendance for their hard work in “taking the University to the community while bringing the community to the University.” The goal, she said, was to make sure “we strengthened relationships with community partners while increasing the visibility of programs and the opportunities available.” From forming administrative councils to help spread the good news of the University, multiple media engagements, to delivering Holiday baskets this past December, the goal has been to foster good partnerships with the surrounding community and the greater Nashville area.

“We have worked hard and people are now taking notice of the University and the wonderful things happening here,” she remarked.

Dr. Glover again thanked everyone for “a year of hard work, collaboration and building trust” in the administration. “There is a lot expected of you,” she told the faculty and staff gathered. “I appreciate everything you do. Your commitment to this University and the students it serves is evident. Continue to do your very best. That’s all I can ask of you.”

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Nashville’s Interfaith Community Holds Prayer Service for TSU, Dr. Glover

Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover, President of Tennessee State University, addresses members of the community during the 2nd annual Presidential Prayer  Service at Jefferson Street Baptist Church Jan. 8. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Creative Services)
Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover, President of Tennessee State University, addresses members of the community during the 2nd annual Presidential Prayer Service at Jefferson Street Baptist Church Jan. 8. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Creative Services)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Mayor Karl Dean, accompanied by several state and local elected officials, joined the clergy and other religious and community leaders on Wednesday in an interfaith prayer service for Tennessee State University and President Glenda Baskin Glover.

Called the Annual Presidential Prayer Service, initiated with the arrival of Dr. Glover following her selection as president of TSU in 2013, the nearly two-hour-long program also recognized improvements and achievements under her watch, as well as hailed the community partnerships formed in just her first year at the University.

Participants in the packed sanctuary of the Jefferson Street Baptist Church, representing Christian, Jewish, Muslim and other faith-based communities, joined hands in songs and prayers for students, faculty, staff, alumni and administrators of the University.

Led by the Reverend Henry Baskin, of Middle Baptist Church of Memphis, Dr. Glover’s brother, whom she referred to as her “spiritual leader,” the congregation surrounded the President in a special prayer for God’s guidance, her well-being and leadership of TSU.

In remarks earlier, Mayor Dean hailed the importance of the faith community for their spiritual insight and the role they play in the development of the city and improvement in the lives of the people.

“The faith community has made a big difference in enriching the lives of our people,” the mayor said. “They are a big part of our community, reaching out in all areas of our lives. Their coming here today is a clear indication of their partnership, support and the importance they attached to this great institution and its leadership under Dr. Glover.

“We genuinely and sincerely pray for your success and the success of Tennessee State University,” the mayor added, referring to President Glover. “As I said before, TSU is our university. We are committed to our partnership with this great university and that has not changed. You have our thoughts, continued dedication and collaboration with our city.”

In a statement of appreciation, Dr. Glover thanked the officials and the faith community for their prayers and show of support for TSU.

Saying “the best is yet to come,” the President told the religious leaders and the faith community that although there are challenges ahead, their prayers and support “reaffirm and remind us” that God is in control.

“God expects you to partner with the community. We need this partnership to continue and for you to step up to be the leaders and community God wants you to be.”

She recounted achievements in her first year, making specific references to the increase in alumni participation and financial support to the University, as well as the “overwhelming” corporate, community, alumni and student response to her SOS sent out last semester that saved 350 from being purged. In just six days, the University raised $483,000, enough to cover the expense of majority of the students, while others who qualified, made payment arrangements for their balances.

“No student will be turned away at Tennessee State University because of the lack of resources,” Dr. Glover said to thunderous applause from more than two hundred faculty, staff, alumni, business and community leaders at a press conference in the atrium of the Avon Williams campus on Sept. 10.

“God has been good to TSU,” Dr. Glover said at the prayer service, calling on students to remain hopeful and put their trust in God to “open the right doors” for them. “Don’t be discouraged because your hopes are not accomplished immediately; God sees all things and He knows your circumstances.”

To the faculty and staff she said: “You are doing things that God has prepared you for. God will promote you in front of those who oppose you in your work.”

Among others making remarks at the service were State Rep. Harold Moses Love Jr. (58th District-D), who is also pastor of St. Paul’s AME Church; Dr. Ray Richardson, TSU professor, representing Corinthian Baptist Church; Yuri Cunza, president of the Nashville Hispanic Chamber of Commerce; Dr. Judy Cummings, president of the Interdenominational Ministers Fellowship and pastor of New Covenant Christian Church; Minister Majid Muhammed, of Muhammed’s Mosque #60, Nation of Islam; and Rabbi Saul Strosberg, of the Congregation Sherith Israel.

Also giving remarks were: Devonte Johnson, president of the TSU Student Government Association; the Reverend Roderick Belin, pastor of Lee Chapel AME Church; Reverend Reginald Brock, pastor of St. Matthews AME Church; Reverend Frank D. Stevenson, senior pastor of St. Luke Primitive Baptist Church; Reverend Christopher Jackson, pastor of Pleasant Green Baptist Church; Reverend Jimmy Greer, pastor of Friendship Missionary Baptist Church; Reverend Ronald Powe, pastor of St. Luke CME Church; and Reverend Enoch Fuzz, pastor of Corinthian Baptist Church.

The Reverend Darrell A. Drumwright, senior pastor of the Temple Church, presided at the prayer service.

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

African-American History and Culture Conference to Open Feb. 14

LCAAHClogo2NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Room) – The 33rd annual Nashville Conference of African-American History and Culture will take place Friday, Feb. 14, 2014 at the Tennessee State University Avon Williams campus.

Co-sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts at Tennessee State University, and the Metropolitan Historical Commission, the conference will focus on the educational and musical legacies of Nashville’s African-American community. For more than 30 years, the award-winning conference has brought together historians, students, educators, community leaders and others interested in African-American history and culture.

During the conference, Dr. Sonya Ramsey, of the University of North Carolina-Charlotte, will speak on the legacy of African-American schoolteachers in Nashville, the subject of her recent book, Reading, Writing, and Segregation: A Century of Black Women Schoolteachers in Nashville.

Additionally, Dr. Don Cusic, professor of Music Business at Belmont University, will speak on educator, poet and activist James Weldon Johnson. Dr. Janet Walsh, coordinator at the TSU Avon Williams Campus library, Beverly Robertson with the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, will highlight the research and interpretation of the African-American experience at their institutions.

In commemoration of the Sesquicentennial year of the Battle of Nashville in the American Civil War, Norm Hill will join Dr. Tim Johnson to discuss the Civil War experiences of Nashville’s African Americans during the Battle of Nashville.

For more information, contact Tara Mielnik, Metropolitan Historical Commission, at 615.862.7970, or Linda Wynn at 615.532.1550.

For more than 30 years, the Metropolitan Historical Commission and Tennessee State University have celebrated the contributions of African-Americans to Nashville and Tennessee through the Nashville Conference on African-American History and Culture. Each February, Nashvillians come together to honor these individuals through historical and cultural presentations by historians, artists, students, dramatists, musicians, genealogists, and others interested in the history of our city and state. The long-running series, Profiles of African Americans in Tennessee, a collection of almost 200 short publications, makes the Conference research available to the public.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

2nd Annual Presidential Prayer Service Rescheduled to January 8

DUE TO EXPECTED INCLEMENT WEATHER, THE 2ND ANNUAL PRESIDENTIAL PRAYER SERVICE HAS BEEN RESCHEDULED TO WEDNESDAY, JAN. 8 

Prayer service

NASHVILLE (TSU News Service) – Members of Tennessee State University and the local community will bow heads and clasp hands when they join together for the 2nd annual Presidential Prayer Service WEDNESDAY, Jan. 8 at the Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church.

Located at 2708 Jefferson Street in the historic Jefferson Street district, the service begins at 8 a.m. and is open to all University students, faculty, staff, alumni and community members.

Leaders from faith-based communities across metro Nashville and Davidson County will participate in the service. Local and state leaders, including Mayor Karl Dean, are also scheduled to speak. The service is a show of support for TSU President Glenda Baskin Glover and the University as the spring semester begins.

Reverend James Thomas and the Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist church are hosting the event for a second year. The pastor and church have special meaning for Dr. Glover who attended the church as a student at TSU.

Dr. Glover, who is completing her first year at Tennessee State University, was inaugurated as the eighth president of TSU Oct. 25. She is the first female to lead the institution.

Following the service, the public is invited to attend a reception in the Fellowship Hall.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Mourns the Loss of Eleanor Montgomery

Tigerbelle Eleanor Montgomery
Tigerbelle Eleanor Montgomery

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU Sports Information) – The Tigerbelles lost one of their greatest athletes as 2013 came to a close.

Tigerbelle Eleanor Montgomery passed away on Dec. 23, 2013. Montgomery was a member of the legendary Tigerbelles that took the Olympic Games by storm as a member of Ed Temple’s team.

The Cleveland, Ohio native wasted little time making the national stage, as she took home her first national title at 14-years-old in long jump. Montgomery qualified for the 1964 Toyko Olympics in the high jump, where she finished eighth, with a jump of 1.71 meters.

The Tigerbelle returned to the games in 1968, competing in the high jump at the Mexico City games, finishing tied for 19th.

Overall Montgomery won 13 AAU indoor and outdoor titles during her career, as well as taking home the high jump crowns at the 1963 and 1967 Pan American Games. In the 1963 event she set the meet record in the event.

This past November Montgomery was elected to the USA Track and Field Hall of Fame becoming the 10thmember of the Tigerbelles to receive the honor. The high jumper was also inducted into the Greater Cleveland Sports Hall of Fame in 1976.

The viewing is this Friday from 5-8 p.m. at Calhoun Funeral Home in Bedford Heights, Ohio. Montgomery’s funeral service is set for following day at Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church, beginning at 10 a.m.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.