Category Archives: NEWS

President Glover Joins Others in Remembering and Honoring Nelson Mandela

NelsonMandela

The following is a statement issued by the University on the passing of Nelson Mandela: 

Tennessee State University President, Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover, joins hundreds in paying tribute to former South African President Nelson Mandela. The 95-year-old Mandela died Thursday evening.  He rose to national prominence during his 27-year imprisonment for treason due to his opposition to the country’s stringent segregation laws.

“The world has truly lost an iconic figure who represented the very essence of humanitarianism,” says Dr. Glover. “Former South African President Nelson Mandela was a selfless individual who took on the role of leadership in his country long before becoming its first Black president . Mandela dedicated his life not only to dismantling apartheid in his native land, but stood against global injustice for all people.”

President Glover adds, “The greatness he embodied as visionary leader to promote a multi-cultural society is the basis of our world today and he is recognized rightfully so as a historic figure in our History and Africana Studies courses at Tennessee State University.

“A few years ago, I had the life-changing experience of visiting Robben Island where Mandela was held as prisoner.  His transformative life leaves a restored nation and an enriched world.”

With profound sadness, TSU honors Nelson Mandela’s commitment to world unity, and we pray for God’s blessings on the Mandela family.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU’s Student Affairs Division Receives Performance Award for Excellence

Commitment_Award_2013NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University, Division of Student Affairs has earned the Commitment Award in the annual Excellence in Tennessee recognition program administered by the Tennessee Center for Performance Excellence (TNCPE). TNCPE is the only statewide quality program and is patterned on the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program, the national standard for recognizing organizational excellence.

“A concerted effort has been undertaken over the last two years to streamline our processes and improve customer service,” said Dr. A. Dexter Samuels, associate vice president of Student Affairs. “This award affirms what I already know that the staff in the division of student affairs is committed to excellence and to making a positive difference in the lives of our students.”

Dr. A. Dexter Samuels
Dr. A. Dexter Samuels

The Tennessee State University Division of Student Affairs exists to serve the co-curricular needs and facilitate the total development of students.

Through an annual evaluation and assessment process, TNCPE recognizes high-performance organizations that exhibit continuous improvement and best practice processes. This year, TNCPE has named 26 organizations as 2013 Award winners. They represent outstanding achievement in health care, manufacturing, service, education, government and nonprofit.

“Groups trying to improve understand that being successful takes effort from each employee, and a shared commitment to quality and achievement,” said Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam. “Organizations like the Division of Student Affairs at Tennessee State University, play a critical role in making Tennessee a better place to live, work and raise a family.”

Organizations such as Tennessee State University apply to the TNCPE program at one of four levels. As the levels increase, so does the depth and complexity of the application, which is based on the Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence. Since the program was founded in 1993, only 22 organizations have attained the Excellence designation. Mountain States Health Alliance will receive the Excellence Award this year, while six organizations will be honored with the Achievement Award. Eighteen organizations, including Tennessee State University, will receive a Commitment Award; and one will receive the Interest Recognition.

Commitment Awards are presented to organizations that are beginning to demonstrate commitment to, and implementation of, performance improvement principles. They have demonstrated progress by identifying and putting in place a measurement system to capture data and analyze results, and some key process improvements, which are directly attributable to a fact-based improvement process.

“This program helps organizations look at the big picture. But it’s not easy–if it were, every organization in the state would be participating,” said TNCPE President Katie Rawls. “Organizations like Tennessee State University are truly passionate about performance excellence and have chosen TNCPE and the Baldrige framework to help them become the best-run organization they can be.”

Tennessee State University, Division of Student Affairs will accept the award at the 21st annual Excellence in Tennessee Awards Banquet on Feb. 19, 2014.

A full list of winners can be found on the TNCPE website www.tncpe.org

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Music Professor Contributes to New American Music Dictionary

Chip Henderson
Chip Henderson

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A music professor from Tennessee State University is one of the latest contributors to one of the largest reference works geared toward music and musicians.

Chip Henderson, an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Music, contributed to The Grove Dictionary of American Music, the principal research source for generations of musicians, and has been widely acclaimed as an indispensable resource.

The new edition, often called AmeriGrove, doubles the original four volumes first published in 1986, and will grow to eight volumes, with 5,592 pages. Of the more than 9,300 articles, more than 4,800 are new.  Henderson, who teaches commercial guitar and music appreciation, submitted five articles to the updated edition.

“It was an exciting project,” said Henderson. “It was a great experience to be a small part of such a large project. I was one of 1,500 writers asked to take part in this great undertaking.”

Henderson submitted articles on Elmer Snowden, Johnny Smith, Scott Hamilton, Larry Coryell and James Blood Ulmer, and will be part of the more than 4,800 new articles.

In an interview on the Oxford University Press website, the editor of the new edition, Charles Hiroshi Garrett, associate professor of musicology at the University of Michigan School of Music, Theater and Dance, said that the shape of the updated AmeriGrove reflects a remarkable effort of teamwork and scholarly cooperation. Nearly seventy editors and advisors—specialists in American music representing top universities and research institutes from across the United States and around the world—devoted substantial time to the project.

“This new edition is a significant makeover. Each of these participants, each assigned to key subject areas, helped design the coverage, scope, and content of the dictionary,” said Garrett. “The editorial team also received and reviewed suggestions from Grove readers and many scholars of American music. Over the course of the project, the contents of the dictionary continued to expand as editors and contributors recognized potential areas of growth and commissioned new articles.”

Garrett added that the new version would take an expanded view of certain American musical forms – country music, for example. To illustrate the scope of the change, he noted that the first edition had about 90 entries about country music.

“In response to the sustained impact of and scholarly interest in country music,” Mr. Garrett said, “the updated dictionary features a newly commissioned, extensive article on country music as well as nearly 300 articles dedicated to individual country musicians, groups and subgenres.”

In addition to country, the dictionary will also expand to capture a wider spectrum of musical activity, and to discuss musical practices often lost in the margins, including Latino, Asian-American, Native American, and Hawaiian music and musicians.

The new dictionary is expected to be published Dec. 2 and will cost $1,195.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Nashville Pastor Joseph Walker to Speak at TSU December Commencement

Bishop Joseph W. Walker III
Bishop Joseph W. Walker III

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) –  Recognized as one of Nashville’s ministerial community’s most educated and influential leaders, Bishop Joseph W. Walker III, the charismatic pastor of Mt. Zion Baptist Church, will be the keynote speaker when more than 500 undergraduate and graduate students receive their degrees during Tennessee State University’s fall commencement on Saturday, Dec. 14.

The commencement begins at 9 a.m. in the Gentry Center on the main TSU campus.

Walker, described as a teacher, humanitarian, philanthropist, businessman and community volunteer, has been the pastor at Mt Zion since 1992. Under his leadership, the church membership has grown from 175 when he started to 28,000. During that time, the church, considered one of the largest in the city, has expanded beyond its original location in the historic Jefferson Street corridor to seven weekly services in three locations, as well as online and through social media outlets.

Currently the Bishop of Senior Pastors in the Full Gospel Baptist Church Fellowship International, Walker’s leadership at Mt. Zion has also expanded to Jackson, Tenn., where the church has adopted the Zion Church.

A prolific writer, the Baton Rouge, La., native has authored eight books, including his latest, “Becoming A Couple of Destiny: Living, Loving and Creating a Life that Matters,” which he co-wrote with his wife, Dr. Stephanie Walker, assistant professor of Pediatrics and Neonatology at Vanderbilt University.

He holds a bachelor’s degree from Southern University, a Master of Divinity degree from Vanderbilt University, and a Doctor of Ministry from Princeton University. Walker is a member of the Board of Directors of the American Red Cross, and holds a governor-appointed post on the Tennessee Human Rights Commission.

In 2001, he launched the New Level Community Development Corporation, which aims to improve the lives of low-and-moderate-income families. He and his wife are co-founders of the non-profit, Dr. Joseph & Stephanie Walker Foundation, which is geared toward education, mentorship and outreach.

Walker, who says he believes in strong work ethic and staying busy, credits his parents, Rosa and Joseph Walker, and especially his father, Joseph Jr., with instilling in him a strong sense of discipline and business-mindedness.

“My summer days throughout most of my youth were spent working with my father,” Joseph III is quoted as saying in his online biography. “I gained my strong work ethic through that experience.”

Named by The Root as one of the 20 Top Preachers in the nation, Walker has appeared on many national TV and radio networks and programs including CNN and the CBS Morning News. He was featured in the film, Black, White and Blues, directed by award-winning Mario Van Peebles.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Holiday Celebration Brings Joy to Needy Families, Senior Citizens

TSU_Holiday FlyerNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – In a true spirit of giving this holiday season, Tennessee State University will hold a Community Holiday Celebration, Tuesday, Dec. 3 on the University’s main campus. The event gives students, faculty and staff the opportunity to spread holiday cheer to the community.

The occasion will include a tree-lighting ceremony with songs, Santa and picture-taking at 5:30 p.m., on the foot of the steps in the circle at the Campus Center. Immediately following the ceremony, several students, faculty, staff and alumni will distribute gifts to designated needy families in the community.

At 10 a.m., TSU President, Dr. Glenda Glover, accompanied by her Cabinet as well as students and staff, will visit a Nashville assisted-living center to distribute gifts of basic need supplies, and poinsettias grown on the TSU farm to residents of the center. This will also include holiday songs and other cheerful activities.

To assist in these efforts, President Glover is asking for donations of nonperishable food items, unwrapped toys for boys and girls ages 6 and up, and toiletries and personal items. She said unlike in the past when TSU adopted a needy family to help, this year’s goal is to help an entire community.

“We realize there are many charities and opportunities for our faculty, staff and students to support during the holidays and throughout the year,” Dr. Glover said. “However, we encourage you to join in this celebration to help make the holiday season a little brighter for those families that are in need.”

To collect donations and gift items, drop-off boxes are located cross the main and downtown campuses. Gifts and card contributions must be delivered to the Office of Public Relations and Communications in the McWherter Administration Building Room 222. Cash or check contributions are accepted in the Office of the University Bursar, also in the McWherter Building on the first floor.

For more information on how and where to donate, please call (615) 963-7451.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Civil and Architectural Engineering Students Capture Awards at Water Resources Conference

Students from the University's Civil and Architectural Engineering program recently attended the annual Tennessee American Water Resources Association conference at Montgomery Bell State Park, where they had the opportunity to present works of research to conference attendees. (Courtesy photo)
Students from the University’s Civil and Architectural Engineering program recently attended the annual Tennessee American Water Resources Association conference at Montgomery Bell State Park, where they had the opportunity to present works of research to conference attendees. (Courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – More than a dozen students associated with the environmental engineering program at Tennessee State University made a dramatic showing at the annual Tennessee American Water Resources Association conference including three first-place and grand-prize award winners.

Held Nov. 4-6 at Montgomery Bell State Park, 14 students represented the University’s engineering program at this year’s gathering. Overall, more than 300 participants attended the conference including scientists and engineers from private consulting firms, state and federal agencies, and academia.

The TSU representatives included area high school students conducting research in the laboratory under the guidance and mentorship of the University’s engineering faculty members, and undergraduate and graduate environmental engineering majors.

Students from the TSU program competed in the poster presentation section of the conference against students from area high schools, including Hume-Fogg Magnet, Martin Luther King Jr. Magnet, and Stratford Magnet high schools, as well as Vanderbilt, Tennessee Tech University and the University of Tennessee-Knoxville.

“The competition was fierce and every student did an excellent job describing their research to attendees,” said Dr. Thomas Byl, assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, and advisor to the group.

According to Byl, the TSU group presented a diverse array of research projects that included the development of a model to describe chemical transport in karst aquifers; storm runoff chemistry; biodegradation of quaternary ammonia compounds and linear alkyl sulfonates, sorption isotherms, and karst hydrology near the Cumberland River; electricity generation by wetland bacteria; and groundwater microbial response to antibiotics.

“My congratulations go out to the students and Dr. Byl for all of their excellent works,” said Dr. Gouranga Banik, chair of the Civil and Architectural Engineering deaprtment. “It is indeed a great honor for the department to get so many awards for the students from a reputed conference like AWRA.”

High school senior Petra Byl  from Hume Fogg Academic Magnet High School, speaks to a conference attendee about her research project.
High school senior Petra Byl from Hume Fogg Academic Magnet High School, speaks to a conference attendee about her research project.

Title of poster presentation, student researcher, and school affiliation included:

Biodegradation of Quaternary Ammonia Compounds by Biofilm and Free-Living Bacteria. Zheer Ahmed, Martin Luther King Jr. Academic Magnet High School

Antibiotic Resistance and Substrate Utilization by Bacteria Affiliated with Cave Streams at Different Levels of Mammoth Cave. Petra Byl, Hume Fogg Academic Magnet High School (1st place high school, and, Grand Prize Award)

Reduction of Selected Chemical from Storm Runoff by Filters and Biodegradation. JeTara Brown, TSU  (1st place undergraduate research)

Solute Transport in Karst, a Dual Continuum Model. Justin Harris, TSU

Re-Designing the RV Waste-Transfer Station at MACA to Avoid Spills. Sean McMillan, TSU

Regression Analysis to Determine Correlations between Environment and Storm Runoff Water Quality. David Solomon, TSU

Fate and Transport of Chemicals at Mammoth Cave, Ky. Ashley West, TSU

Aquifer Tests to Characterize the Hydraulic Connection between the Cumberland River and Groundwater in Nashville, Tenn. Aras Barzanji, TSU

The Development and Use of Sorption Isotherms to Optimize Storm-Filter Design. Hung-wai Ho, TSU

Enhancing the Design of Microbial Batteries in Wetlands. Lina Khoury, TSU (1st place graduate research)

Evaluation of Green Remediation Strategies at the Velsicol Landfill, Hardeman County, Tennessee. Loreal Spear, TSU

The Tennessee Section of the American Water Resources Association strives to promote the advancement of water resources research, planning, and education by providing an annual forum to exchange multidisciplinary ideas about water issues throughout Tennessee and the surrounding region. The Tennessee Section has provided this annual forum since 1988.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Forensic Team Captures Back-To-Back Wins

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Members of the Tennessee State University Forensics team traveled to the bayou state recently to compete in the 39th Annual Red River Swing Debate and Forensic tournament in Shreveport, La.

Competing in their first International Public Debate Association tournament, the team competed in the event Nov. 8-10 at Louisiana State University-Shreveport and joined nearly 30 other programs, colleges and universities from around the country.

“Our debate team is off to a great start,” said Director of Forensics, Shaunte Caraballo. “I look forward to increasing the size and success of our newly added debate team.”

The teams competed in two separate tournaments involving 11 speaking and interpretive events, and one tournament involving three different debate formats over the three-day tournament.

TSU’s Artrisa Fulton, a Criminal Justice major, was the team’s big winner. The senior from West Palm Beach, Fla., was the Octafinalist in the IPDA. She also captured third place in the Dramatic Interpretation category. Michael Thomas, a senior Accounting major from Memphis, Tenn., won 6th place in the Persuasive Speaking category.

Building on their successes, the team traveled to Jefferson City, Tenn., a week later for the Tennessee Porch Swing at Carson Newman University Nov. 15-17.

First year team member, Michael Thomas won 1st place and Top Novice in Persuasive Speaking at the second half of the swing. Assistant Directors of Forensics, Adam Key and Jeremy Coffman jumped up and hugged each other when the award was announced.

“It is extremely rare for a novice to win such a high award,” said Key.

Thomas also won Top Novice in Programmed Oral Interpretation, along with Fulton, who took 4th place in Dramatic Interpretation. They are both just one win away from qualifying for the national tournament held at Arizona State University in Tempe, Ariz.

The Forensics team will next head to Ohio State University for the Holiday Frolic in December.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU vice president elected to APLU leadership committee

Dr. A. Dexter Samuels, associate vice president for student affairs at TSU, has been elected to serve on the executive committee for the Council on Student Affairs with APLU. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
Dr. A. Dexter Samuels, associate vice president for student affairs at TSU, has been elected to serve on the executive committee for the Council on Student Affairs with the APLU. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s associate vice president for Student Affairs has been elected to a leadership position with the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities, a non-profit organization with members across the country to advance learning.

Dr. A. Dexter Samuels will serve for three years on the Executive Committee for the Council on Student Affairs.

“This is a great honor, and will be an excellent opportunity to meeting and work with colleagues from across the country to discuss best practices in student affairs,” said Samuels. “The APLU is an excellent organization that deals with innovation and real student issues.”

The CSA deals with many issues that are critical to student success in college, such as admissions, student financial aid, health and wellness, and graduation rates. The council sponsors conference presentations and informal forums to discuss issues that affect students’ overall experience at college issues. The parent organization, APLU, has participants from all 50 states.

The APLU is a research, policy, and advocacy organization representing 219 public research universities, land-grant institutions, state university systems, and related organizations. Founded in 1887, APLU is the nation’s oldest higher education association dedicated to advancing learning, discovery and engagement.

Samuels adds the new leadership position to others he currently holds. He also serves as the vice chairman of the Board of Directors for the Metropolitan Nashville Airport Authority, and serves on the board for the Martha O’Bryan Center.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Honors Students Attend Leadership Conference, Leave with Job offers

ThurgoodMarshallCollegeFund_logoNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Eight outstanding Tennessee State University students recently attended a conference aimed at providing a unique professional experience that included leadership training and recruitment opportunities.

The group from the University’s Honors Program attended the Thurgood Marshall College Fund Leadership Institute Nov. 8-12 in Washington, D.C. During the four-day conference, the students had a chance to meet with some of the nation’s top executives for leadership training and recruitment opportunities, but also career management, life skills and development.

Selected though a competitive process, the students attending included Angelina Berry, mathematics major; Shondalyn Smith, computer science major; Cecily Wiseman, architectural engineering major; Jer’Mykeal McCoy, communications major; Jaime Garcia, business administration major; Mia Black, business administration major; Stephanie Austin, psychology and health sciences double major; and Jessica Lozada, biology major.

According to Dr. D. Lee McGahey, associate director of the Honors Program, the students had the opportunity to meet with representatives from more than 60 companies and government agencies.

“This was incredible,” said McGahey of his inaugural attendance at the institute. “I have never seen anything like it in my life; so many high-powered, educated, wealthy minorities in one location with the sole purpose of pouring back into the next generation of future leaders. This is what family is about to me.”

Six of the students interviewed with top companies, while three received offers of employment.

Berry interview and received an offer from Booz Allen Hamilton; Smith interviewed with Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation and Walmart Stores Inc., and received an offer from IBM; and Garcia interviewed with Altria and Walmart, and received a job offer from Walmart Stores Inc. Corporate Headquarters.

Wiseman interviewed with Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and the Woodrow Wilson Institute; McCoy interviewed with Microsoft Corporation; and Black interviewed with Altria, Hershey and Microsoft Corporation.

When asked what her greatest take away was from this year’s institute, Smith said for her the focus was not about just going to every session just to be going through the motions.

“As a returning student scholar, this time was about putting everything into action with my interviews and getting that job that would launch my career, said the Birmingham native who will graduate later this month. “And guess what, it all paid off.  I got the job!”

TSU has a rich history of student and leadership development.  For more than 100 years, the University has forged alliances with many Fortune 500 companies in order to expose students to leadership models, real-world issues, and organizational environments where leadership embodied.

Continuing that legacy of excellence, the university has developed a relationship with the Thurgood Marshall College Fund over the past eight years and experienced tremendous success through the experience.  Founded by Dr. Ann Joyce Payne in 1987, TMCF is to the Nation’s 47 public Historically Black Colleges and Universities what the United Negro College Fund is to the Nation’s private HBCUs.

To help financially support our students to attend next year’s Leadership Institute 2014 or for more information about the Thurgood Marshall College Fund at TSU, please contact Dr. D. Lee McGahey, associate director of the University Honors Program, at 615-963-5803 or dmcgahey01@tnstate.edu.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU’s PAC House Productions Goes Hollywood with “Voices of War”

Mark Schlicher (left), operates a camera jib during the filming of Voices of War, a documentary about life at Travellers Rest Plantation during the Civil War. PAC House Productions at Tennessee State University produced the 20-minute documentary that will debut Nov. 23 at the museum. (courtesy photo)
Mark Schlicher (left), operates a camera jib during the filming of Voices of War, a documentary about life at Travellers Rest Plantation during the Civil War. PAC House Productions at Tennessee State University produced the 20-minute documentary that will debut Nov. 23 at the museum. (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A short 10 miles from the steps of Tennessee State University stands a living museum that pays tribute to one of the bloodiest battles to take place during the Civil War.

Travellers Rest, a plantation and now a museum located at Harding Place and Interstate 65, saw some of the fiercest fighting during the two-day Battle of Nashville, where approximately 6,000 Confederate soldiers were killed, captured or considered missing in action. The battle decimated the southern forces in Nashville and was literally fought on the front lawn of the plantation.

Today, students from TSU’s PAC House Productions are bringing that history back to life with the documentary, Voices of War.

The Department of Communications student-led production company helped write, direct and produce the 20-minute documentary for the historic landmark’s new exhibit, The Battle of Nashville: History Unfolds at Travellers Rest, which debuts Nov. 22 at the museum.

According to Melissa Richie, director and editor of Voices of War and advisor to PAC House Productions, the project began a year and a half ago when she and Dr. Donald Page, professor of Communications, where asked to participate in creating media for the historic landmark’s new exhibit. After countless hours of collaboration with Travellers Rest on writing the script, pre-production began last spring with filming this fall. Now in its final phase, the documentary is ready for debut at the museum.

“Of all the colleges and universities in middle Tennessee, the Board of Directors commissioned the students from PAC House Productions at Tennessee State to produce this documentary,” said Richie, who also serves as assistant professor of Mass Communications at the University. “That really says a lot about the capabilities we have and the quality of work our students produce. This short documentary will rival anything you might see at the Smithsonian or any other Civil War museum.”

The documentary, filmed over five days at the Travellers Rest Plantation, cast more than 30 Civil war re-enactors, including men, women, children and horses sporting period-correct costumes, and depicts life on the plantation during the Battle of Nashville.

According to MC Potts, producer of the documentary, the hard part was the coordination of “all the moving parts.”

“It was very stressful and made for some extremely long days,” said Potts, a senior from Columbus, Ohio majoring in Theater and Communications. “The filming began the end of October, which is a very busy time of year at the plantation, and for the re-enactment community. All the students on the production team worked hard putting this together and we are very proud of the final product.”

Besides the production crew, others lending their talents to the documentary include Tennessee Governor, Bill Haslam, who provides the video epilogue, and Maj. Gen. Terry “Max” Haston, Adjutant General of the Tennessee National Guard, who portrays Andrew Johnson. Tennessee National Guard Assistant Adjutant General, Maj. Gen. Robert Harris, portrays Isham Harris who was the Governor of Tennessee from 1857 until 1862, and Col. (ret.) Randy Harris, public affairs director for the Tennessee National Guard, who lends his voice for character narration for the documentary.


(As seen on Fox 17 morning News)

PAC House production members that worked on the documentary included Micah Wickre and Chris Garner, directors of photography; Jonathan Starks and Justin Dixon, assistants of photography; assistant directors Jasmine Scarber and Ariana Heslup; special effects editing by Tervell Smith; crew members Sean Jenkins and Thema Dial; set photographer and crew member JaQuita Stewart; and actors Carrington Edwards, Tyree Taylor and Porshia Edwards.

Travellers Rest is the oldest house open to the public in Nashville. Built in 1799, it was home to several generations of the Overton family. In December 1864 it served as the headquarters for the Confederate Army under Gen. John Bell Hood. Covering nearly 1,050 acres, some of the heaviest fighting took place on the second day of the Battle of Nashville at Peach Orchard Hill on the plantation grounds. Today the plantation is a living piece of American history depicting life before and after the Civil War.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.