Category Archives: NEWS

TSU to Host Metropolitan Nashville Minority Caucus’ Ninth Anniversary Reception Feb. 27

Adam McFadden
Adam McFadden

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The Metropolitan Nashville Minority Caucus will hold its ninth Anniversary Reception at Tennessee State University on Thursday, Feb. 27, beginning at 5 p.m.

Several Metro government officials, local business owners and community leaders are expected to attend the event in the Ferrell-Westbrook Building, also known as The Barn.

Speakers at the reception will include TSU President, Dr. Glenda Glover, who will make welcome remarks. Adam C. McFadden, councilmember of the Rochester, N.Y. City Council and President of the 2014 National Black Caucus of Local Elected Officials, will be the keynote speaker.

Invited guests are asked to RSVP at Roseanne.hayes@nashville.gov. Parking will be available at the Gentry Center Complex. Shuttle service will be provided to ferry guests to and from the reception hall.

The Metropolitan Nashville Minority Caucus is headed by Councilmember Erica Gilmore, as president; and Councilmember Fabia Bedne, vice president.

 

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Conference of Southern Graduate Schools Elects TSU Dean to Prestigious Executive Committee

Dr. Michael Orok
Dr. Michael Orok

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Dr. Michael Orok has been elected to the Executive Committee of the Conference of Southern Graduate Schools. The committee studies and reviews issues and problems facing graduate education particularly those in the South.

Orok, dean of the School of Graduate Studies and Research at TSU, will serve for three years on the 12-member committee.

“I am very appreciative of the privilege to serve on this prestigious committee of the Conference of Southern Graduate Schools,” Orok said upon his election. “I am committed to assisting the Conference to promote and support graduate education, and develop contemporary strategies and approaches for academic programing.”

The CSGS, an organization of more than 200 graduate schools in 15 southern states including the District of Columbia, Oklahoma and Texas, considers topics relating to graduate study and research, which are of mutual interest and concern to member institutions.

Orok, a longtime educator who periodically serves as an accreditation off-site visit reviewer for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, said he recognizes the challenges facing graduate education and the “complex modalities” of learning, particularly in today’s technologically driven environment.

“I am prepared to assist the Conference (CSGS) in moving forward at it takes on these complex issues,” he said.

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Steps Up Security Measures, Introduces Campus-Wide Identification Policy

IDCardNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Effective March 1, all Tennessee State University students, faculty, staff and administrators will be required to wear and display their identification badges while on campus or attending campus events, the Office of Emergency Management has announced.

Failure to comply with the new policy may result in employee disciplinary action, student judicial action or removal from University property.

With a recent rash of break-ins and vandalisms attributed to people not associated with TSU, officials say the new policy is intended to readily distinguish University personnel and students from visitors and unwelcomed guests.

“Our primary concern is always to provide a safe and healthy environment for all of our students, employees and visitors,” said Dr. Curtis Johnson, associate vice president for Administration, who is in charge of Emergency Management. “Safety on our campus is priority number one, and with the new policy, we want to ensure that our students, faculty and staff are safe at all times.”

Since employees already have ID cards, which they carry in their wallets or pockets, the University has purchased clip-on ID badge holders to be distributed to everyone by the march 1 deadline, Johnson said.

Students will have custom TSU lanyards for their ID cards, he added.

Campus wide, faculty and staff have embraced the new ID requirement, saying that they have no problem with wearing their badges, as long as the policy is intended to improve security and safety.

“If it is for the safety of our students, faculty and staff, I am all for it,” said Dr. Veronica Oates, associate professor of Family and Consumer Sciences and president of the Faculty Senate.

Yvonne Sanders, president of the Staff Senate, has also given the new policy her full endorsement.

“This is one change I have no problem with,” Sanders said adding, “If this helps to provide security and safety for our students, faculty and staff, I will gladly wear my name badge.”

Along with this new safety policy, Johnson said, is the introduction of a new identification card system, which will give employees more than just access to campus.

“The goal is to add value to the card, where in the very near future, an employee will be able to use their ID card to access buildings on campus, just like students, use it as a meal card, checkout library materials, and make purchases like a debit card. It will contain encrypted contactless technology to ensure secure transactions,” Johnson said.

He said the new ID card, with software managed by Stanley Security, would include a color photo, name, ID number and campus classification. On the back of each ID card would be a large magnetically encoded stripe with the wearer’s ID number and additional pertinent data.

“However, we are replacing the key FOB (for students) with ID Cards containing a Proximity Chip, along with a magnetic strip on the rear of the card that provides greater capabilities, such as access control to residence halls, computer labs, athletic events, concerts, digital media labs, Post Office Services, and several other academic locations,” Johnson said.

The ultimate goal here, Johnson added, is to increase campus security, streamline safety practices and increase customer service.

“Implementing this new policy also provides a measure of accountability we would not otherwise have,” he said.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

First Lady Pays Tribute to Wilma Rudolph During TSU Visit, Reads to more than 25 Anxious Children

First Lady Crissy Haslam reads to more than 25 young girls from Girls On the Run Nashville during her visit to Tennessee State University Feb. 19. Haslam was at the University as part of her Read20 Family Book Club initiative. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)
First Lady Crissy Haslam reads to more than 25 young girls from Girls On the Run Nashville during her visit to Tennessee State University Feb. 19. Haslam was at the University as part of her Read20 Family Book Club initiative. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – As part of Black History Month celebration, Tennessee first lady Crissy Haslam used her Read20 Family Book Club to pay tribute to legendary Olympic champion and Tennessee State University great Wilma Rudolph during a program Wednesday at the Edward S. Temple Track on campus.

Since February not only serves as Black History Month, but also the backdrop for the 2014 Winter Olympics, Haslam said she selected “Wilma Unlimited: How Wilma Rudolph Became the World’s Fastest Woman,” for her book of the month to inspire children about Rudolph’s story about overcoming adversity.

The book, a dramatic and inspiring true story illustrated in bold watercolor and acrylic paintings, highlights the TSU alumna and Olympian, who overcame a distinct illness to win three gold medals.

“Wilma Rudolph made an incredible impact on society for African Americans, for women and for all people who have hurdles to clear,” Haslam said to members of the TSU track team, and more than 25 anxious and cheering members of Girls on the Run, a youth development program for girls in third through eighth grades.

“Her journey is particularly inspiring this month as we celebrate African-American history and enjoy the 2014 Winter Olympics,” she added

Joining Haslam at the program was former Olympic champion and head coach of the TSU track and field program, Chandra Cheeseborough-Guice, who thanked the first lady for selecting TSU for her book-of-the-month reading.

“We appreciate you coming on our campus to grace us with your presence, and for inspiring these students by highlighting the story of Wilma Rudolph, who was an inspiration to me as an athlete and so many others,” Cheeseborough-Guice said.

Also receiving special recognition at the program was Yolanda Kovan Rudolph, Wilma Rudolph’s eldest daughter, who is also a former TSU student.

Following the program, the students from Girls on the Run, under the direction of Coach Cheeseborough-Guice, performed drills with the TSU women’s track and field team.

“I am truly inspired by the first lady’s initiative,” said Charis Quarles, a sophomore Theater major from Nashville, who is manager of the TSU men and women’s track program. “It was really nice for her to be able to come and support these young children.”

As part of her effort to promote parent engagement in education, Haslam launched the Rdead20 Family Book Club nearly two years ago, giving Tennessee families a fun goal of reading together every day. Books of different reading levels and styles of writing are selected each month to help children foster love for reading and learning.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

University’s Honors Program Celebrates 50 Years of Excellence

Former CNN news anchor and award-winning journalist Soledad O’Brien featured speaker March 26 during Honors Program Convocation

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – This academic year the Honors Program at Tennessee State University will celebrate 50 years of positive and life-long learning, scholarly inquiry, and a commitment to service.

Award-winning journalist Soledad O'Brien will be the featured speaker March 26 during the Honors program Convocation.
Award-winning journalist Soledad O’Brien will be the featured speaker March 26 during the Honors program Convocation.

The yearlong celebration will commemorate the program’s journey throughout the years, and will be capped by a visit to campus on March 26 by award-winning broadcast journalist Soledad O’Brien. The former CNN anchor will be the featured speaker at the Honors Anniversary Luncheon at 11 a.m. that will honor Dr. McDonald Williams, the first Director of the Honors Program. O’Brien will also be the featured keynote speaker during the Honors Day Convocation beginning at 1 p.m.

The Honors Convocation in Kean Hall is free and open to the public. The Honors Anniversary Luncheon is $50 per person and takes place in the Gentry Center.

O’Brien’s appearance is sponsored by the Office of Student Affairs as part of the Distinguished Lecture Speaker series.

At the convocation, notable Honors alumni will address the student body, Honors societies, Honors alumni and community members.

According to Dr. Coreen Jackson, director of the Honors Program, the primary goal of the program is to create and maintain a community of academically bright and talented students who serve as campus leaders and role models.

“The key objective is the academic enrichment of our students and working with them to achieve their goals,” she added. “We have the opportunity to teach students who are excited about learning and have the freedom to explore issues from multiple points of view. The program not only impacts the students but also the entire University.”

Other events planned for the celebration include an Honors Research Symposium to coincide with the University-wide Research Symposium March 31 through April 5. During the fall, the celebration will culminate with a special 50th Anniversary cake-cutting ceremony and an Honors Week observance.

Jackson added that the jubilee celebration kicks off with an “Honors 50 for 50” campaign to raise funds to help the program transition to an Honors College. The new college, she said, will encourage interdisciplinary programs, enhance undergraduate research in all disciplines, advising for prestigious fellowships and scholarships, develop a mentoring program to make our students more competitive, encourage lifelong learning, including a global perspective through study abroad.

“We are attempting to raise $500,000 to offset the cost of transitioning the program to a full-fledge Honors College,” added Jackson. “As a College, we will be able to highlight the importance of offering an enriched honors curriculum and to increase the University’s ability to recruit and retain high-ability students. We have a program that has a national reputation that has exceeded the basic characteristics of honors program and already meets the characteristics of an Honors College, as recommended by the National Collegiate Honors Council, the recognized leader in undergraduate honor education.”

In 1963, Dr. Walter S. Davis, then President of Tennessee State University, appointed a committee that was charged with studying honors programs and determining the feasibility of establishing one at the University. The committee recommended that TSU keep pace with other institutions throughout the country. As a result, an honors program for freshman students started in the fall of 1964. Sophomore through senior level course work was added yearly throughout 1968.

During the years since 1964, the Honors Program has continued to develop and grow, moving from a converted classroom in the Agricultural Building to the present Honors Center, located on the first floor of the Student Success Center. The center includes study areas, a computer room, conference room, classroom, multipurpose /lounge, and offices of director, associate director and the administrative assistant. Phi Kappa Phi, Golden Key and Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Societies are also housed in the Honors Center.

More important than the physical changes that have taken place, according to Jackson, are the increasingly large number of students entering the program and the achievements they are making.

“They come from many different states and countries and have a variety of majors,” she said. “Consistent with honors objectives, honors students continue to be admitted to prestigious graduate and professional schools.”

For more information on the anniversary activities or Honors Convocation featuring Soledad O’Brien, contact the Honors Program at 615.963.5731.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Fans Urged to Vote as Home Depot Kicks off Annual Retool Your School Campaign

437xNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – It’s time to vote again TSU fans, alumni, students, faculty and staff!

The annual Home Depot Retool Your School Campus Improvement Program and voting kicked off Monday, Feb. 17.  At stake is the much coveted nearly $250,000 award for campus improvement projects.

To get a share of the money, TSU must compete with other Historically Black Colleges and Universities across the country. Each school submits a brief description of projects to be considered. Winners are determined through online voting, which runs through April 14.

Awards are given out in the following grant categories: Tier I, a single $50,000 grant; Tier II, 13 $10,000 grants; and a $25,000 Campus Pride Grant for each of the three schools that receive the most votes and social media activity.

According to Ron Brooks, associate vice president for Facilities Management, TSU has submitted three proposals for improvements around the campus. The first, a Tier I project, would create a Heritage Walk Mall similar to the Jefferson Street Gateway to Heritage Plaza that would memorialize TSU history and those associated with it. The second project, for a Tier II grant, would install an interactive information kiosk that displays TSU history, directions and general-event information.

Also on TSU’s list is a proposed project for the Campus Pride Grant to erect TSU banners along Jefferson/John Merritt Boulevard.

“It’s really important for everyone to get involved in voting and help TSU secure these funds,” said Brooks. “We are thankful for our leadership, hard work and commitment of all to move these projects forward. However, to make them a reality, we are going to have to rely on the votes from alumni, students, faculty, staff and supporters.”

According to The Home Depot, the goal of the Retool Your School program is to provide sustainable and lasting renovations to give new life to HBCUs campuses. Each year, the outpouring of support for the program from alumni, students, parents and the community grows. Since the program’s inception in 2010, more than three million votes have been cast as the HBCU community bands together for their favorite and most deserving HBCU school projects.

The Home Depot is thrilled to once again offer the Retool Your School Campus Improvement Grant available to HBCUs,” said Melissa Brown, manager of multicultural marketing at Home Depot. “It is such a rewarding program connecting with our communities and it takes school spirit to a whole new level.”

To cast your vote for Tennessee State University, visit The Home Depot link and click on Tennessee State University to vote. You can vote only once each day. Help spread the word for TSU by using the cobranded hashtag #tsuTHDRYS on Twitter and Instagram. Using these hashtags helps to increase our chances of winning the Campus Pride grant.

For more information, visit The Home Depot Retool Your School website.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Competes in Honda Campus All-Star Challenge Qualifying Tournament

Students from TSU took part in one of the regional qualifying tournaments for the Honda Campus All-Star Challenge Feb. 15 at Alabama State University. Pictured are: front row (L-R)  Brandon Bartee, Maurice Henderson, Diarra Fall. Back row (L-R) January Wisniewski, Rebecca Webber, Aurora Garvin, Amadou Fall, Joseph Patrick (courtesy photo)
Students from TSU took part in one of the regional qualifying tournaments for the Honda Campus All-Star Challenge Feb. 15 at Alabama State University. Pictured are: front row (L-R) Brandon Bartee, Maurice Henderson, Diarra Fall. Back row (L-R) January Wisniewski, Rebecca Webber, Aurora Garvin, Amadou Fall, Joseph Patrick (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The road to claim the title of America’s best in the 2014 Honda All-Star Challenge started this weekend for students from Tennessee State University when they traveled to Montgomery, Ala., for the qualifying tournament Feb. 15 at Alabama State University. Forty-eight teams from the qualifying tournaments will then advance to the National Championship Tournament in Los Angeles in April. The teams will be announced on Feb. 20.

The team, according to Dr. John P. Miglietta, professor of Political Science and coach of the TSU team, did well in the tournament, winning two out of four games.

“The students did very well, with several of them playing in their first tournament,” said Miglietta. “TSU was very competitive and the team received valuable experience. This will serve them well if we participate in the national tournament, and certainly for next year.”

Participation in the National Qualifying tournament is an essential part of the qualification process for the National Championship tournament, which will be held April 12-16. Dubbed “the Olympics of the Mind,” the Honda Campus All‐Star Challenge is a “knowledge game of quick recall” that engages the best and brightest students at HBCUs in an annual academic quiz championship. Students compete in answering questions related to pop culture, sports, history, science, current events, and literature, as well as African-American history, and general knowledge categories.

The Challenge, sponsored by Honda, is now in its 25th year. During that time Honda has awarded more than $7 million in grants to participating HBCUs, and nearly 100,000 students in 22 states have taken part.

Representing TSU this year are: Adriann N. Wilson, a junior Mechanical Engineering major from Albany, Ga.; Brandon Cantrel Bartee, junior Mechanical Engineering major from Manchester, Tenn.; Aurora Garvin, a sophomore Art major from Nashville, Tenn.; and Joseph Edward Patrick II, a junior Electrical Engineering major also from Nashville.

Other club members attending the qualifying tournament included Amadou Fall, a junior Chemistry major, from Nashville; Maurice Henderson, freshmen Computer Science major, from Jacksonville, Fla.; Rebecca Webber, a senior Nursing major, from Nashville; and January Wisniewski, a graduate student in Computer Science, also from Nashville.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Professor to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award from Nashville Legal Community

Robert Smith, assistant professor in the Department of Criminal Justice, will receive the will receive the Z. Alexander Looby Lifetime Achievement Award from the Napier-Looby Bar Foundation Feb. 20, during the association's annual banquet. (courtesy photo)
Robert Smith, assistant professor in the Department of Criminal Justice, will receive the Z. Alexander Looby Lifetime Achievement Award from the Napier-Looby Bar Foundation Feb. 20, during the association’s annual banquet. (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Robert Smith, an assistant professor of Criminal Justice at Tennessee State University, will receive the Z. Alexander Looby Lifetime Achievement Award from the Napier-Looby Bar Foundation.

Smith will be honored during the organization’s 10th Annual Barristers’ Banquet and Award program on Thursday, Feb. 20 at the Music City Center in Nashville. The award is named after Z. Alexander Looby, who was a leading Civil Rights lawyer in Nashville along with his law partner, Avon Williams.

Smith, who teaches constitutional and criminal law at the University, will be one of four attorneys to be recognized during the annual awards banquet. During his time at the University, Smith has not only been a strong force in the classroom, but has also coached the TSU Mock Trial team since its inception in the John Marshall School of Law undergraduate competition. Additionally he conducts the CAMA: CSI/Mock Trial for high school students at TSU during the summer.

A nonprofit organization of attorneys in the Nashville legal community, the Napier-Looby Bar Association is dedicated to the advancement and development of black attorneys as well as attorneys interested in issues affecting the black community. Its membership consists of attorneys, in the private and public sectors, as well as judges, law professors, law students, paralegals and other interested individuals.

For more information about the banquet, contact the association at 615.238.6303 or info@napierlooby.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU’s Covington Named All-Star Game MVP

Robert Covington
Robert Covington

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service)  – Former Tennessee State men’s basketball student-athlete and current Rio Grande Valley Viper Robert Covington was named Most Valuable Player of the NBA D- League All-Star Game presented by Kumho Tire.

The Chicago native scored 33 points and added six rebounds and three steals in leading the Prospects over the Futures 145-142 at Sprint Arena at NBA All-Star Jam Session on Saturday night.

Covington, who signed a contract with the Houston Rockets prior to this season, has spent most of his rookie campaign with the Vipers, averaging 21.4 points in 23 games. He’s appeared in five games with the Rockets, averaging 3.8 minutes.

“It’s a great feeling being able to play well in this game in front of our GM Daryl Morey and all these others scouts and NBA people,” said Covington, whose 33 points set a new NBA D-League All-Star Game record. “I feel like I’ve gotten better during my time with Rio Grande Valley, and it’s good to see the hard work paying off in a game like this.”

Covington made 12 of 23 shots in the game, including 4 of 8 3-pointers to set the record and earn the game’s MVP.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Presents “Faces of Success” with Former Freedom Riders Feb. 20

FACES-OF-SUCCESS-001NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The Pre-Alumni Council at Tennessee State University will present The TSU Faces of Success: Then and Now Thursday, Feb. 20 in conjunction with Black History Month.

The seminar begins at 7 p.m. in the Forum in the Floyd Payne Campus Center, and is free and open to the public.

Panelists include former Freedom Riders Dr. Ernest Patton, Dr. Mary Jean Smith, and Patricia Jenkins-Armstrong, who will share their experiences during the Freedom Riders Movement of the early 1960s. Additionally, former and current TSU students Trehon Cockrell-Coleman, Jasmin Garmon, Olivia Buford, and Khamaria Wright, will share their personal and professional experiences. Lauren Thomas, Miss Pre-Alumni Council, will serve as moderator.

Sponsored by the Office of Alumni Relations, the Pre-Alumni Council is a students’ first exposure to alumni activities. The primary purpose of the council is to stimulate the interest and participation of students enrolled at the University in alumni activities prior to and after graduation.

For more information on the seminar, call Seanne Wilson, Alumni Relations and Annual Giving Coordinator at 615.963.5831.

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.