Category Archives: NEWS

TSU Hosts Entertainment Outreach Program Conference Oct. 29

“Leveraging Up!” workshop provides opportunity for students to meet, network with industry professionals

entertainment career fair

NASHVILLE, Tenn.  (TSU News Service) — Tennessee State University will host an entertainment industry college career conference and symposium Tuesday, Oct. 29, from 1:30 until 5 p.m. in The Forum, located in the Floyd Payne Campus Center.

The conference will bring entertainment industry leaders and professionals to the University in order to expose a diverse group of students to the industry while closing the gap between students and recruiters.

Leveraging UP, an entertainment organization dedicated to educating, recruiting and developing the next generation of industry leaders, innovators and visionaries of tomorrow will host a student prep workshop as well as bring some of the world’s leading media, entertainment and communication companies to the University.

Companies scheduled to be in attendance include DreamWorks Animation SKG, Sony, CBS Corporate, the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, Clear Channel and others.

According to organizers, this is an exceptional opportunity for students to meet and network with industry professionals. For students who desire to work in one of the many areas of the entertainment industry or who want to explore the possibilities that the entertainment industry offers, this conference is a must attend.

Students from all majors and backgrounds are invited to participate.  Industry leaders are seeking students from business, mass communications, engineering, technology, music, history, architecture, computer science, and art as well as other academic majors and disciplines.  The conference is for both undergraduates and graduate students.

The conference is free and open to students, and registration is advised. For more information, contact the TSU Career Development Center at 615.963.7527.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

Distinguished Lecture Series Welcomes Keith Boykin to Campus October 9

Keith Boykin
Keith Boykin

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Fighting Words will be the topic of discussion, Wednesday, Oct. 9 when Tennessee State University welcomes Keith Boykin to campus.

The event, part of the Distinguished Lecture Series sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs, will take place in Kean Hall beginning at 1 p.m. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Boykin is a CNBC contributor, MSNBC commentator, BET columnist, and New York Times best-selling author. Each of Boykin’s four books has been nominated for a Lambda Literary Award, including his most recent book, For Colored Boys Who Have Considered Suicide When The Rainbow Is Still Not Enough, which also won the American Library Association Stonewall Award for Nonfiction in 2013.

Educated at Dartmouth and Harvard, Boykin attended law school with President Barack Obama, and served in the White House as a special assistant to President Bill Clinton, where he was once the highest-ranking openly gay person in the Clinton White House. He also helped organize and participated in the nation’s first ever meeting between a sitting president and leaders of the LGBT community.

Boykin has been actively involved in progressive causes since he worked on his first congressional campaign while still a student in high school. He is a veteran of six political campaigns, including two presidential campaigns, and was named one of the top instructors when he taught political science at American University in Washington, D.C.

He has traveled extensively across four continents, and in 1997, was appointed by President Clinton to the U.S. presidential trade delegation to Zimbabwe, along with Coretta Scott King and the Reverend Jesse Jackson.

After starring on the 2004 Showtime television series American Candidate, Boykin has since appeared on numerous national media programs, including Anderson Cooper 360, The O’Reilly Factor, The Tyra Banks Show, The Montel Williams Show, Judge Hatchett and The Tom Joyner Morning Show.

A founder and first board president of the National Black Justice Coalition, Boykin has spoken to audiences, large and small, across the world. He delivered a landmark speech to more than 200,000 people at the Millennium March on Washington, and gave a stirring speech about the AIDS epidemic in front of 40,000 people in Chicago’s Soldier Field in July 2006.

Born and raised in St. Louis, Boykin lives in New York City and Miami.

Former Lecture Series guests have included actress Tasha Smith, actor and author Hill Harper, actress Robin Givens, and four-time Olympic athlete Jackie Joyner-Kersee.

For more information on the Distinguished Lecture Series, contact the Office of Student Affairs at 615.963.5621 or the Office of Media Relations at 615.963.5331.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU Announces Homecoming Week Activities

Members of the Aristocrat of Bands march up Ed Temple Boulevard during the 2012 Homecoming Parade. This year the parade returns to its original route beginning at 14th Avenue and Jefferson Street to 33rd Avenue and Albion Street. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
Members of the Aristocrat of Bands march up Ed Temple Boulevard during the 2012 Homecoming Parade. This year the parade returns to its original route beginning at 14th Avenue and Jefferson Street to 33rd Avenue and Albion Street. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

University ushers in a New Century, New Direction for Excellence

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will hold a week full of exciting events October 20-26 as community members, alumni and friends of the University come to Nashville to celebrate Homecoming 2013.

Inspired by last year’s centennial and moving forward into its next 100 years, TSU will celebrate a New Century, New Direction for Excellence for 2013 with a week full of events.

“Homecoming at Tennessee State University is unlike any other,” said Sandra Griggs, Director of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving. “It’s a time to reconnect with old friends, classmates, and reminisce about the days they walked the campus as a student. The positive changes and growth are remarkable. Although there has been much expansion, the traditions of Tennessee State A&I remain sound.”

While TSU has cherished and maintained certain Homecoming traditions, it has also moved forward across the century, finding new ways to celebrate pride in the institution, its students and alumni. Innovations that have sprung up over the years include the parade, pep rally, Homecoming Court, tent parties and many additional campus activities.

This year sees the return of the Homecoming Parade back to Jefferson Street. The parade route will begin at 14th Avenue and Jefferson Street, and proceed two miles to 33rd Avenue and Albion Street. Last year, the route was moved for the Centennial celebration only to accommodate large floats and a large influx in crowd size. This year’s parade begins at 8 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 26.

The annual Robert Murrell Oratorical Contest will officially kick off homecoming week on Sunday, Oct. 20 beginning at 3 p.m. in the Floyd Payne Campus Center. The Gospel Explosion rounds out the evening, beginning at 6 p.m. also in the Floyd Payne Campus Center.

Student events highlight Monday, Oct. 21 when the Courtyard Show takes place in Welton Plaza starting at 11 a.m., followed by the Battle of the Residence Halls at 7 p.m. in the Floyd Payne Campus Center.

The Blue Sapphire Awards will take place on Tuesday, Oct. 22 in the Walter S. Davis Humanities Building in the Poag Auditorium beginning at 6:30 p.m.

Presidential Inaugural events kick off Wednesday, Oct. 23 in conjunction with Homecoming starting with the Presidential Processional at 11 a.m., and the Mr. and Miss TSU Coronation and Ball at 7 p.m. in Kean Hall.

Events continue on Thursday, Oct. 24 with the Inaugural Symposium at 10 a.m. at the Avon Williams campus Auditorium, and Homecoming Concert at 7 p.m. in Kean Hall.

Friday, Oct. 25 begins with the Investiture of President Glenda Baskin Glover as 8th President of the University beginning at 9 a.m. in the Howard Gentry Complex. Homecoming events include the Charles Campbell Fish Fry on the President’s Lawn at 11 a.m., the annual Pep Rally at 11:45 a.m. in Hale Stadium, and the TSU Pan-Hellenic Step Show at 5 p.m. in the Gentry Complex. Tickets are $10 for students in advance, $15 at the door. The night ends with the Inaugural Reception and Scholarship Gala beginning at 6 p.m. at the Gaylord Opryland Resort.

Saturday, Oct. 26 begins with the Homecoming Parade beginning at 8 a.m., followed by the Showcase of Bands at 2 p.m. at LP Field. The Homecoming football game between TSU and Eastern Illinois kicks off at 4 p.m. at LP Field.

View the complete list of alumni, student, reunion and inaugural events.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU Adds Tree Campus USA Designation to List of Accolades

Students from Tennessee State University plant a red maple tree on campus as part of a celebration recognizing the University as a leader in conservation and sustainability. TSU received the Tree Campus USA designation from the Arbor Day Foundation, a national program created in 2008 to honor colleges and universities for effective forest management and engaging staff and students in conservation goals. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)
Students from Tennessee State University plant a red maple tree on campus as part of a celebration recognizing the University as a leader in conservation and sustainability. TSU received the Tree Campus USA designation from the Arbor Day Foundation, a national program created in 2008 to honor colleges and universities for effective forest management and engaging staff and students in conservation goals. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Rain showers, wind and cooler temperatures could not keep students from Tennessee State University along with community volunteers from planting more than 30 trees around campus Sunday afternoon as part of a celebration recognizing the University as a leader in conservation and sustainability.

Prior to planting Crepe Myrtles, Red Maple and Oak trees around campus, TSU received the Tree Campus USA designation from the Arbor Day Foundation, a national program created in 2008 to honor colleges and universities for effective forest management and engaging staff and students in conservation goals.

TSU, along with Trevecca Nazarene University, were recognized as the first universities to receive the special designation in 2013, bringing the total to 194 institutions taking part in the national program.

“How fitting that today we recognize these two universities in Nashville, who, for the past 18 years, has received its own designation as a Tree City USA by the foundation,” said Mary Sweeny, program manager for the Arbor Day Foundation’s Tree Campus USA. “College campuses have some of the largest urban forests in the country, and we need to protect and become good stewards of these natural woodlands.”

TPrintSU achieved the designation by meeting Tree Campus USA’s five standards, which include creating a tree advisory committee, a campus tree-care plan, dedicated annual expenditures toward trees, an Arbor Day observance, and student service-learning projects.

Dr. Chandra Reddy, Dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, called the designation “great news” for the campus since it is the result of a lot of planning and hard work by faculty, staff and students. But, he said, future leaders, such as the students in attendance at the ceremony, have the responsibility to maintain the health and vitality of not only the campus urban forest, but also woodlands across the country.

“We have denuded forests in the name of progress, along with creating large urban areas void of trees and natural plants,” added Reddy. “We are honored to be part of the program and hope to educate our students on the importance of being good stewards of the environment. We thank the Arbor Day Foundation for making this a priority and to help educate the youth of our nation.”

Getting the campus the designation was the brainchild of Dr. De’Etra Young, extension assistant professor of Urban Forestry. During an interview for a position with the University, she stated it was a goal of hers to get the Tree Campus USA designation for TSU, along with her passion for maintaining the urban forest on the campus. That was in February, and in eight short months, the University fast-tracked its application and became the newest member of the program.

“I didn’t expect this to happen so quickly,” said a smiling Young. “We are going to use this recognition to show that the University is devoted to the environment and knows the importance of sustainability.

The next step, according to Young, is to have the campus designated as a Level 1 Arboretum. To achieve that designation requires that at least 30 varieties of trees be labeled and available for a self-guided tour.

“I think as we move forward and the Tree Campus USA award becomes more recognizable nationally, it will demonstrate that TSU has a long commitment to maintaining our urban forest and the infrastructure of the land,” said Young. “Our plan emphasizes the importance of trees for their aesthetic and social value, as well as for their environmental impact to the campus ecosystem.”

Now in its fifth year, Tree Campus USA recognizes the best practices in campus forestry throughout the United States.  The goal of the program is to honor college campuses and leaders of their surrounding communities for promoting healthy urban forest management and engaging the campus community in environmental stewardship.

The Arbor Day Foundation and Toyota have helped campuses throughout the country plant hundred of thousands of trees, and Tree Campus USA colleges and universities $23 million in campus forest management last year.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU Students Use Latest Cellphone Apps and Technology to Identify Tree Species on Campus

Raphael Smith (left) a junior Agriculture major, and Kyreshia Brown, a junior Agriculture science major, take a photo of a holly leaf during a recent field exercise. The duo was taking part in a Geographic Information Systems class in Urban Forestry that uses technology to identify and locate tree species around campus. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)
Raphael Smith (left) a junior Agriculture major, and Kyreshia Brown, a junior Agriculture science major, take a photo of a holly leaf during a recent field exercise. The duo was taking part in a Geographic Information Systems class in Urban Forestry that uses technology to identify and locate tree species around campus. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Planning and managing vegetation in urban areas can be a complex process, especially when it comes to identifying and locating trees around a 500-acre campus the size of Tennessee State University.

Now students at TSU are using the latest cellphone and GPS technology to inventory and catalogue the multiple species across the University’s urban forest.

Using Leafsnap, an application designed by Columbia University, the University of Maryland and the Smithsonian Institution, students can simply take a photo of a leaf from one of the many trees around campus, and the recognition software will provide a high-resolution identification of the tree species.

“This is a great hands-on tool for many of our students who come from different backgrounds and majors to help identify the different species here on campus,” said Dr. De’Etra Young, extension assistant professor of Urban Forestry. “It really is the perfect application for providing an electronic guide to take out in the field for research purposes.”

(Video courtesy of The Tennessean)

The students are all in Young’s Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems class, that explains the computer-based tool used to create, store, manage, analyze and display data that correspond to unique locations in space. According to Young, the tool allows users to analyze and visualize information based on location.

“Many of our students are in various agriculture programs and have had no previous exposure to these types of programs and tools,” added Young. “The free applications, such as Leafsnap, give them the tools to be able to go out into the field and be comfortable conducting research.”

Kyreshia Brown, a junior planning to attend veterinary school and couldn’t tell the difference between a maple or oak tree, loved that she could use her cell phone to help her easily identify different species.

“This really is a good compliment to what we are learning in class,” said the agriculture science major. “We are using high-tech applications that fit right in the palm of our hands.”

Once the students identify the trees, they then use hand-held GPS systems to locate the trees. Eventually, the descriptions and locations will be fed into a database that will map every tree on campus.

The map will then provide a visual representation of the University’s urban forest and its overall inventory.

“This is all part of our green initiative here on campus,” added Young. “Our students are learning about the health and diversity of our urban forest by using these simple high-tech tools to gather the information. The students seem to be really excited about the project.”

TSU will receive the Tree Campus USA designation from the Arbor Day Foundation Sunday, Oct. 6 for its part in promoting healthy trees and engaging staff and students in conservation efforts. Tennessee State will become one of only 190 universities and colleges across the country to receive the special designation. The program, funded by the Arbor Day Foundation and Toyota, has helped campuses throughout the country plant hundreds of thousands of trees since the program began five years ago.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU to Welcome 5-Time Grammy Winner Victor Wooten Oct. 4

victor_wootenNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will welcome five-time Grammy award winning musician Victor Wooten Friday, Oct. 4 for an appearance with students, professors and the community in Poag Auditorium.

Wooten, author of The Music Lesson: A Spiritual Search for Growth Through Music, which discusses the musician’s life lessons about the elements of music, will be the second guest of the newly launched lecture series, “Music Matters: Hosted by Dr. Rod Taylor,” sponsored by the Department of Language, Literature and Philosophy.

Wooten’s lecture will feature a mixture of music from some of his earlier and most recent recordings.

Dr. Rod Taylor, assistant professor of Literature and Writing and creative consultant and editor on Wooten’s book, said he and the musician and author will discuss the process of working on the book, which is available in four languages and being used in curriculums in universities, high schools and learning institutions around the world.

“Through our exchange, I hope students will see how writing can be a collaborative project and how the joy of writing is in the process not just the end product,” Taylor said. “I also hope they can see the unique relationship among language, writing, teaching and music.”

Taylor’s English 1010 class will be the subject of Wooten’s lecture.

Wooten, whose solo efforts and collaboration with artists like Stanley Clark, Bruce Hornsby, India Arie and Dave Matthews have led him to be regarded as one of the greatest bass players of all times, is revered by his fans and peers for his uncanny skills on the guitar.

Two of his latest CDs, “Words and Tones,” a collection of 14 tracks featuring various female vocalists; and the instrumental, “Words and Stone,” represent the various sides of Wooten’s unique approach to music, performance and songwriting highlighted by a searing bass solos that will boggle the mind.

Wooten continues to tour with his band, The Victor Wooten Band, which has received rave review on their last three tours.

The Oct. 4 appearance in Poag Auditorium will begin promptly at 12:40 p.m. For more information, contact Dr. Rod Taylor at rodctaylor1@gmail.com or 615-963-4896.

For more information about this series, visit the Music Matters Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/musicmattersconversations

This is the second guest in the “Music Matters” series. The first guest was legendary bass guitarist Chuck Rainey who made at one-day appearance at the University September 12.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU President to Host Scholarship Receptions for Davidson and Rutherford County High School Seniors

6198956652_0f6bd1ca4d_b_stitch_0.jpgNASHVILLE Tenn. (TSU News Service) –Tennessee State University President Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover will continue her scholarship tour by hosting receptions for high school seniors in Davidson and Rutherford counties. President Glover previously hosted a reception for West Tennessee and Northern Mississippi high school seniors on September 11during her visit to Memphis.

The Davidson County reception will take place in Nashville on Thursday, Oct. 3 on the University’s main campus in the Farrell-Westbrook Complex beginning at 6 p.m. The Rutherford county reception will be held in Murfreesboro at the Hampton Inn, Big Blue Tiger Ballroom on Thursday, Oct. 10 at 6 p.m.

“We look forward to continuing to be a leader in providing access to higher education in the state of Tennessee” said Dr. Glover. “We continue to work together with area high school counselors to make sure that we can assist students through scholarships to realize their dreams of higher education, and to help those that need it most as they pursue a path to a better life through education.”

Students receiving the scholarships will have a direct pipeline to the University, and will be provided four years of funding their education. The Office of Admissions and Recruitment at TSU worked closely with high school counselors to identify high-achieving students to receive the scholarship based on grade point average and ACT/SAT test scores.

“Scholarship recipients were recommended by their high school guidance counselors and will be honored along with their families for their academic success,” explained Dr. John Cade, Associate Vice President for Enrollment.”

“Partnering with high school guidance counselor across the state of Tennessee has been a major success and has greatly assisted us with meeting our goals and objective for the recruitment cycle,” said Dr. Sedric Griffin, Director of Admissions and Recruitment.

The Office of Admissions and Recruitment will also be hosting a Fall Preview Day for high school seniors on Saturday, Oct. 5 at noon on the University’s main campus. Please visit students.tnstate.edu/previewday for detailed information.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU to Receive Tree Campus USA Designation From Arbor Day Foundation

Tree Planting and Recognition Ceremony Takes Place Sunday, Oct. 6 

 

PrintNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will host a tree-planting event to promote and increase the University’s commitment to building a healthy urban forest by planting trees on the campus.

Sponsored by the Arbor Day Foundation through the Tree Campus USA program, the event is scheduled to take place Sunday, Oct. 6 when students, faculty and staff, and community volunteers will plant more than 30 Crepe Myrtles, Red Maple and Nuttal Oak trees around campus.

The program, which is funded by Toyota, is planned to commemorate both TSU and Trevecca Nazarene University’s commitment to promoting healthy urban forest management, and engaging the campus community in environmental stewardship.

The day kicks off at 9 a.m. with an educational workshop sponsored by the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education in the Farrell Westbrook Complex (Barn). The AASHE will discuss sustainable landscapes on university and college campuses around the country.

A special recognition ceremony takes place at 10:45 a.m. in the Barn Auditorium when TSU and Trevecca will receive the Tree Campus USA distinction.  Tree planting and volunteer work begins at 1 p.m.

Now in its fifth year, Tree Campus USA recognizes the best practices in campus forestry throughout the United States.  The goal of the program is to honor college campuses and leaders of their surrounding communities for promoting healthy urban forest management and engaging the campus community in environmental stewardship.  TSU and Trevecca will become two of the more than 190 universities taking part in the program.

The Arbor Day Foundation and Toyota have helped campuses throughout the country plant hundred of thousands of trees, and Tree Campus USA colleges and universities $23 million in campus forest management last year.

For more information, contact Jen Svendsen, Arbor Day Foundation programs project manager, at 402.473.9574 or jsvendsen@arborday.org.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top-20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

Tennessee State University to Celebrate Founders’ Day October 3

The Honorable Harvey Johnson Jr.
The Honorable Harvey Johnson Jr.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will revisit one of its most hallowed traditions on Thursday, Oct. 3 when it holds its annual Founders’ Day program to honor all those who have sacrificed through the years to make TSU the leader in higher education that is has become.

The event will take place in the Howard C. Gentry Center beginning at 9 a.m., and is free and open to the public.

The Honorable Harvey Johnson Jr., former Mayor of Jackson, Miss., will provide the keynote address. Johnson served as the first African-American mayor of Jackson from 1997-2005 and again from 2009-2013.

Johnson is a native of Vicksburg, MS., where he graduated from Rosa A. Temple High School.  He received a bachelor’s degree in political science from Tennessee State University in 1968 and a master’s degree in political science from the University of Cincinnati in 1970.  He has done additional study toward a doctoral degree in public administration at the University of Southern California’s Washington Public Affairs Center.  Johnson was awarded the Doctor of Humane Letters, from Tougaloo College.

In 1997, Johnson made history by being elected Jackson, Mississippi’s first African-American mayor.  In 2001, Jackson voters again chose Johnson for a second four-year term as mayor of Mississippi’s Capital City. He was elected to a third term in 2009, making him the longest-serving mayor under the City’s mayor-council form of government, which was instituted in 1985. He left office in June of 2013.

Johnson led the effort which resulted in the construction of the City’s first Convention Center, located adjacent to a new state-of-the-art, high tech Telecommunications Training and Conference Center. Johnson-created initiatives include:  Jobs for Jacksonians, which focuses on finding jobs for local residents; the Equal Business Opportunity Program, established in 1998 to ensure that minority contractors have an equal opportunity in the procurement of City contracts; Fresh Start, a program to assist ex-offenders in re-entry into the community; and monthly ward meetings, where local residents are given the opportunity to meet with City officials, department directors and staff.

Prior to being elected Mayor of Jackson, Johnson assisted economically depressed small towns with minority leadership in obtaining basic necessities such as water and sewer service, as the founder and Executive Director of the Mississippi Institute for Small Towns, a nonprofit agency. His 25 years of professional experience include planning and community development as well as serving as assistant professor of political science at Jackson State University. He is a former member of the Commission on Colleges for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

During his years as mayor, Johnson served on the U.S. Conference of Mayors Advisory Council, President of the National Conference of Black Mayors, member of the National Conference of Democratic Mayors,  member of the Executive Committee of the Democratic National Committee, and a charter member of 100 Black Men of Jackson, Incorporated. He was a 1965 initiate into Beta Omicron Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., and he is a life member.  Johnson is also a life member of the NAACP.  He has served on the Boards of Directors of various private and non-profits organizations, and has received numerous awards, commendations, recognitions and honors.

Harvey Johnson, Jr. is married to Kathy Ezell Johnson, and they have two adult children, Harvey III and Sharla.  He is a member of Hope Spring Missionary Baptist Church.

For more information on the event, call 615.963.5331.

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU Jazz Collegiates Help Open Exchange Opportunities in Colombia Through Music

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is hoping a trip to Colombia, South America this summer by the University’s Collegiate Jazz Band will open doors for both educational and cultural exchange opportunities for students in the near future.

This past August, the 20-piece jazz band was invited to perform at the Flower Festival, Colombia’s largest jazz festival that attracts thousands from around the country. Acting as ambassadors for the University, the band was the only American university to perform, exposing more than 6,000 attendees to their special brand of music and performance style.

“They were basically treated like rock stars,” said Dr. Jewell Winn, TSU Chief Diversity Officer. “They were able to bridge the cultural gap through their music. The band was very well received wherever they went, and not only helped to open doors for other TSU students to travel here, but also students from Colombia to come to Tennessee State as part of cultural and academic exchange programs.”

The trip came about after Dr. Winn gave a presentation last spring on diversity and exchange programs currently taking place at the University.  The Director of the Colombo Americano Center of Medellin also presented at the meeting and extended an invitation to TSU, Julliard and the University of Vermont to conduct jazz workshops at local universities throughout Colombia.  This initiative was so successful that after the quartet returned to Nashville, Winn received a call not only inviting the Jazz Collegians to perform at the Mardi Gras-style festival, but also inviting her to meet with different universities to discuss exchange opportunities.

(Watch the Tennessee State University’s Big Band Jazz in Medellín, Colombia)

 

“It was exciting because I was able to meet with university officials one-on-one to discuss study abroad and exchange projects,” she added. “I missed the Education USA conference due to other commitments, so to be given this personal opportunity to meet with university and government officials, and students in Medellin, Bucaramanga, and Choco, was quite exciting.”

During the seven-day trip, Winn met with five different universities including the University of Antioquia, ESUMER University, the Technological University of Choco, EAFIT University and Pontifica Bolivariana University.

During each visit, according to Winn, administrators were interested in exchange programs with TSU faculty to conduct research and teach at their institutions as well as providing opportunities for their students to attend graduate school at TSU.

“It was all about establishing relationships with these sister institutions,” added Winn.  “The next step is to sign Memorandums of Understanding. This is the perfect opportunity to recruit high-achieving students from Latin American countries to attend TSU, especially because of the growth of the Latino population in Nashville.”

While Dr. Winn was visiting universities around the capitol city, the Collegiate Jazz Band was busy preforming not only at the festival, but smaller venues such as malls and schools.

“It really was an eye-opening experience for us,” said James Sexton, Director of Collegiate Bands. “It showed that no matter the cultural or language difference, that music really is something that transcends any cultural gap.”

The band played six concerts during their seven-day stay, and according to Sexton, at least 3,000 people attended each.

“It was a thrill to see the audience and their excitement for each of our performances,” added Sexton.  “The audiences had never experienced the high-energy type shows we perform and they showed their appreciation through multiple standing ovations. Their love of music definitely showed through.”

Both Winn and Sexton believe the trip was successful as far as planting the seeds of future exchange programs. In the near future, Colombian students will attend TSU band camps to learn the mechanics and performance styles of a marching band, and in an unprecedented move, the entire Aristocrat of Bands has been invited to perform in the 2014 Flower Festival.

“This is going to allow us to provide cross-cultural experiences to our students so they can appreciate and learn the differences we all have especially now in a shrinking global environment,” said Winn.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
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About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu