Category Archives: NEWS

NSF Funding Helps College of Engineering Support Local High School STEM Programs

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The College of Engineering has received several grants from the National Science Foundation related to developing simulation and gaming modules to enhance learning in engineering education. These research projects engaged undergraduate and graduate students in developing simulations in machine design and graphics.

In support of STEM Education in Metro Nashville Public Schools, the College of Engineering is also assisting with the creation of the gaming and simulation laboratory at Stratford STEM Magnet High School, under a partnership with the National Safety and Security Technologies Academy at Stratford.

Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College of Engineering, who has been affiliated with Stratford High for more than two years, serves as an advisor to the NSST academy, as it transforms the curriculum to STEM disciplines and careers.

“Our college is committed to supporting K-12 education and partnering with MNPS through the Pencil Foundation, and playing a key role in educating future engineering students from our local community,” Hargrove said.

The Foundation, which administers eight educational programs involving volunteers and mentors, links community resources with Metro Nashville Public Schools. It also provides academic enrichment opportunities, and prepares students for graduation.

As part of the COE/NSST partnership, a group of six students and two instructors from Stratford Magnet High School participated in a Virtual Reality Workshop on Oct. 10 at Tennessee State University. The workshop, conducted by Dr. Sachin Shetty, assistant professor of Electrical Engineering, introduced the students to software tools used in commercial Virtual Reality systems.

According to Dr. Shetty, participants gained practical experience creating simulations with Vizard, a 3D engine used to create Virtual Reality Applications.

This was a step up from the 2D gaming module the students had previously been exposed to, according to Roger Osborne, one of the Stratford instructors. “The experience of creating a 3D virtual world and learning techniques to animate 3D characters and objects was extremely valuable,” he said.  “The students were able to ‘learn by doing’ through a sequence of exercises geared toward exposing them to development of a 3D virtual reality game.”

Osborne expressed interest in deploying the Vizard software in the Stratford gaming labs, as well as adopting it to the school’s criminal justice program to help students create an investigative scene in a 3D virtual world.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

Drum Major Devyn Miles Marches in the Footprints of Trailblazers for Change

Devyn Miles performs with the Aristocrat of Bands recently at LP Field during the John Merritt Classic. Miles is the third female drum major in the marching band’s nearly 70-year history, and the first in almost 20 years. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
Devyn Miles performs with the Aristocrat of Bands recently at LP Field during the John Merritt Classic. Miles is the third female drum major in the marching band’s nearly 70-year history, and the first in almost 20 years. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Atlanta Native Only the Third Female in History to Lead TSU Marching Band

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Don’t be fooled by Devyn Miles’ lanky, 110-pound frame with a baby smile that will charm even the toughest heart.

At 5 feet 10 inches tall, she does not settle for the conventional. In fact, she challenges the status quo.

And that, along with hard work, has earned her front-row presence with the Aristocrat of Bands, as the only female drum major on the Tennessee State University 221-member marching show band.

Miles’ presence breaks a long all-male dominance of the now four-member squad, considered the heartbeat of the band. She becomes only the third female drum major in the marching band’s nearly 70-year history, and the first in almost 20 years.

“I had been watching and wondering how come there is no girl up there,” said Miles, a junior Computer Science major with concentration in Bioinformatics, and a French horn player in the marching band and the Wind Ensemble.

After being with the band for three years, Miles was just not pleased with the continued absence of a female on the leading team, referred to as the “Fantastic 4,” although she knew becoming a drum major would require a lot of work.

Along with being a drum major for the AOB, Miles also plays French horn in the marching band and the Wind Ensemble. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
Along with being a drum major for the AOB, Miles also plays French horn in the marching band and the Wind Ensemble. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

“Just then the call came out for applicants to try out for two drum major spots, and immediately I said to myself, ‘This is your chance Devyn,’” the Atlanta native said. “But there were some key requirements. Before even applying you had to have proven leadership skills, a minimum 2.7 GPA, and playing ability.”

For Miles, those seemed to be the easy part. She was averaging almost a 3.0, had been playing instruments since middle school, and she knew she could lead.  She applied and made the final cut as the only female along with four males to compete for the two spots.

Miles was ready for what laid ahead – the auditions and conditioning. In fact, according to Acting Band Director, Dr. Reginald McDonald, Miles was a formidable competitor in the tryout. She asked for no favors, and wanted no special treatment because she was a female.

“Actually what helped Devyn during the try-out process was that she did not look different from the men,” McDonald said. “She went out of her way to make sure that she was able to keep up with the men and that no one in our audience was able to distinguish the one female from the three males until they took off their hats.”

In the long history of the marching band, Miles’ team of applicants was the first group to go through a tryout to become drum majors. Prior to spring 2013, McDonald said drum majors were selected by the band director.

“First I was scared and felt some intimidation about the amount of work involved in the tryout, including a lot of practice,” Miles said. But she was used to hard work. Playing the French horn, arguably the most difficult brass instrument to master, one must practice a lot. And, that she did in the tryout, to master every move, step, detail, and definitely, throwing and catching the mace.

“You can’t let your mace fall; it’s sacred,” Miles said, adding, “I set my mind to it with a lot of practice until I found a comfortable way to do it.”

Miles was selected along with another male.  Today, she is a key part of the “Fantastic 4” – standing tall, moving in unison with the others and gracefully tossing and catching her mace – as she and the other three drum majors whistle and signal commands to their fellow marchers.

“Devyn is a very capable part of our team and I am glad to have her as a member of the Fantastic 4,” said Semaj Wansley, head drum major and a senior Music major from Moss Point, Miss. “I admire her work ethic. She overcomes those difficult obstacles placed before her, and I am sure that’s going to take her far in life.”

While Miles is thankful to her fellow band members and directors for their support, she can only imagine the difficulty her earlier compatriots faced more than 30 years ago (when the band allowed its first female) to make it possible for her to even dream of becoming a drum major.

“A lot of people supported me and there was no resentment toward me, and I thank them for that because if it was not for that support I probably wouldn’t be here,” Miles said. “I feel very fortunate and blessed because I heard it was not so smooth for the other females who were here before me. Their struggle and perseverance helped to pave the way for me.”

Felicia Carter Johnson was one of those females. As the first woman band member to become a drum major at TSU, Johnson, a Birmingham, Ala., native, had a bumpy start.

“I was teaching a dance routine when Prof. (Edward) Graves asked me if I was interested in becoming a drum major,” said Johnson, a 1983 graduate (Biology), then a sophomore with a dual role of playing the tenor saxophone in the marching band and the baritone saxophone in the Jazz Band.

She agreed but little did she know the amount of resentment she would receive from her fellow band members.

“I was resented mainly by the men and some even quit because I was asked to join, and that really hurt me,” Johnson said. “But I realized that I was a musician first, and I didn’t think it (drum major) was handed to me. I felt I earned it because I was just as qualified and good as any of them. There were many others who supported me and some of those who quit started coming back when they saw how well the band was doing. Some apologized to me later.”

Johnson’s perseverance, talent and leadership showed that women were just as capable as men, and paved the way for other women such as Quanda Watkins (’92 – Sociology, trombone) of Atlanta, who would later become only the second female TSU drum major, and now Miles. These women, together, prove that anything is possible. You just have to have the courage to steer ahead.

“I am glad I didn’t just think about wanting to be a drum major. I saw the opportunity and I went for it,” said Miles, whose dream is to become a music producer or arranger.

For now, Miles is making sure her mace never falls, and staying in step with the “Fantastic 4.”

Don’t forget to come out on Saturday, Oct. 26, when the “Fantastic 4” and the Aristocrat of Bands lead the TSU Homecoming parade down historic Jefferson Street.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

Homecoming Parade Returns to Historic Jefferson Street

Members of the TSU cheerleading squad march in the 2012 Homecoming parade. This year, the parade returns to Jefferson Street and will begin at 8 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 26. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)
Members of the TSU cheerleading squad march in the 2012 Homecoming parade. This year, the parade returns to Jefferson Street and will begin at 8 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 26. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

Parade takes to the streets at 8 a.m.

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The Tennessee State University Homecoming Parade will return to its roots this year, beginning on Jefferson Street, and proceeding through the community that has supported the University for the past 50 years.

That makes Yusef Harris very happy.

The owner of the Alkebu-Lan Images bookstore, who last year saw a decline in profits due to the route change, was excited when he heard the news that the parade was making a comeback to the historic Jefferson Street community.

“Homecoming is a special community event for all the small business owners along the parade corridor,” said Harris. “Last year we missed out on some of the economic benefits when the route changed. There is a lot of excitement in the business community on the parade’s return. It’s a mutually beneficial event for the school and the community.”

Click for parade route (graphic by Joshua Holly, TSU Creative Services)
Click for parade route 

The 2013 Homecoming parade, themed Tennessee State University: New Century, New Direction for Excellence, takes place Saturday, Oct. 26, beginning at 8 a.m. from the corner of 14th Avenue and Jefferson Street. At least 10 bands are expected to march the two-mile route through the streets of the community and into the University. TSU President, Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover, will serve as Grand Marshall.

The only change in this year’s parade is the time, beginning an hour earlier than before.

“Homecoming at Tennessee State University is unlike any other,” said Cassandra Griggs, director of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving. “The Homecoming game at LP Field starts an hour earlier at 4 o’clock so we needed to adjust the schedule to allow all our alumni and community guests ample time to make it to the game.”

Last year, the route was moved from Jefferson Street to around the exterior of the campus for the Centennial celebration, to accommodate large floats and a larger influx in crowd size. Crowds in 2011 were estimated at 50,000, with the 2012 parade bringing in more than double that amount.

According to TSU Police, officials this year are bracing for at least 40-50,000 parade-goers, with half of that number between 28th Avenue and Jefferson Street to the parade’s end at 33rd Avenue and Albion Street.

“We’ll have extra security from the Metro Nashville Police Department to augment our forces during the parade,” said Assistant Police Chief, Anthony Carter. “We just want to make sure everyone has a safe and fun time.”

Harris, whose business is located on the corner of 28th Avenue and Jefferson Street, said he is ready for the return not only because of the economic impact, but also because of the sense of pride the parade brings to the community.

“This annual event fills all of us, not only the business community but the community at large, with pride,” he said. “It is a piece of our tradition and history, and we are glad to see it back where it belongs.”

A parade shuttle service will be available for TSU employee staff and volunteers departing from the Gentry Center at 6 a.m., and for the TSU Royal Court departing from the airplane in front of Kean Hall at 6:30 a.m.

The staging area for parade participants will take place between 12th and 16th Avenue from Meharry Boulevard to Jackson Street. The Metro Nashville Police Department will close Jefferson Street to the University beginning at 7:30 a.m.

For more information, contact 615.963.5331.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

Harvard Training Increases TSU Students’ Knowledge on Civic, Political Engagement

Dr. Michael Harris, dean of the College of Public Service and Urban Studies, middle, and students Erica Richardson-Carter, left, and Beonca James, represented TSU at the just-ended conference of the National Campaign Consortium for Political and Civic Engagement at Harvard University.
Dr. Michael Harris, dean of the College of Public Service and Urban Studies, middle, and students Erica Richardson-Carter, left, and Beonca James, represented TSU at the just-ended conference of the National Campaign Consortium for Political and Civic Engagement at Harvard University.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Shutting down the government, raising the debt ceiling and the rising cost of education are some of the major issues currently facing the United States. The politics and ramifications of these drain resources and impact decision making on the national and local levels.

But understanding these issues and the ability to clearly articulate their impact and ensuing debates or maneuverings in Congress, states assemblies or around the dinner table require a keen and engaged mind that is derived from education, information and participation.

At Tennessee State University, the College of Public Service and Urban Affairs is developing and implementing programs in these three areas to increase students’ awareness and engagement.

“Our goal is to work to facilitate and develop civic-minded and politically engaged students as part of their learning experience,” said Dr. Michael Harris, dean of CPSUA, who recently accompanied two students to Harvard University, where they participated in a two-day (Oct. 4-5) conference of the National Campaign Consortium for Political and Civic Engagement, sponsored by the Kennedy School of Government, and the Institute of Politics.

TSU was one of 24 universities from around the nation selected to take part in the annual workshop that included such institutions as Harvard, University of Oklahoma, Tufts University, Louisiana State University, University of Texas, University of Virginia and the University of Chicago.

Dr. Harris said the conference demonstrated the “valuable strategic mission” of CPSUA to educate leaders who serve and create sustainable and engaged communities. He added: “The Harvard experience and the ongoing work with 23 other universities will allow our students and faculty to enhance CPSUA’s contributions to engagement and citizenship activity at TSU and in Middle Tennessee.”

Beonca James, a senior Urban Studies and Sociology major from Lancaster, S.C., who accompanied Dr. Harris, said the discussion on how to implement social change through community service, advocacy and politics offered a great learning experience.

“TSU students and faculty can be a huge influence for change on campus and in the surrounding communities,” James said, adding, “if only we could get people more involved in the issues and give them the skills to implement the change they seek.”

The person pushing the NCC agenda as its campus coordinator for TSU is Dr. Cara B. Robinson, assistant professor of Urban Studies. She said the purpose of the consortium is to promote voting and civic engagement on college campuses.

“Each member of the NCC is charged with creating unique approaches to the promotion of voting and civic engagement across their respective institutions,” Robinson said. “As we initiate our campaign, we want to emphasize the role of CPSUA in the promotion of civic and political engagement on the TSU campus and greater community, as well as our plans for the next year.”

Under the theme “Change Agent: Tools for Effective Advocacy,” the conference discussed engagement in electoral politics, helping students pursue a career in public service, and a foundation in civic education.

“I am very excited about our campus campaign,” said Erica Richardson-Carter, a junior Urban Studies major from Nashville, Tenn., who also attended the Harvard conference. “I think the first thing we need to do to get our students engaged in making them aware of government affairs.”

She said this could be accomplished through the establishment of what she called a “Did you know campaign,” utilizing social media, text or the Banner service. “Our (campus) team will be meeting soon to brainstorm ideas,” Richardson-Carter added.

For more information on the TSU campus campaign, contact Dr. Robinson at (615) 963-7243 or crobin22@tnstate.edu.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU Announces Homecoming, Inaugural Week Events

Homecoming2013University ushers in a New Century, New Direction for Excellence

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will hold a week full of exciting events October 20-26 as community members, alumni and friends of the University come to Nashville to celebrate Homecoming 2013 and the Investiture of the University’s eight president, Dr. Glenda Glover.

Inspired by last year’s centennial and moving forward into its next 100 years, TSU will celebrate a New Century, New Direction for Excellence for 2013 with a week full of events.

“Homecoming at Tennessee State University is unlike any other,” said Cassandra Griggs, Director of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving. “It’s a time to reconnect with old friends, classmates, and reminisce about the days they walked the campus as a student. The positive changes and growth are remarkable. Although there has been much expansion, the traditions of Tennessee State A&I remain sound.”

While TSU has cherished and maintained certain Homecoming traditions, it has also moved forward across the century, finding new ways to celebrate pride in the institution, its students and alumni. Innovations that have sprung up over the years include the parade, pep rally, Homecoming Court, tent parties and many additional campus activities.

This year sees the return of the Homecoming Parade back to Jefferson Street. The parade route will begin at 14th Avenue and Jefferson Street, and proceed two miles to 33rd Avenue and Albion Street. Last year, the route was moved for the Centennial celebration only to accommodate large floats and a large influx in crowd size. This year’s parade begins at 8 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 26.

The annual Robert Murrell Oratorical Contest will officially kick off homecoming week on Sunday, Oct. 20 beginning at 3 p.m. in the Floyd Payne Campus Center. The Gospel Explosion rounds out the evening, beginning at 6 p.m. also in the Floyd Payne Campus Center.

Student events highlight Monday, Oct. 21 when the Courtyard Show takes place in Welton Plaza starting at 11 a.m., followed by the Battle of the Residence Halls at 7 p.m. in the Floyd Payne Campus Center.

The Blue Sapphire Awards will take place on Tuesday, Oct. 22 in the Walter S. Davis Humanities Building in the Poag Auditorium beginning at 6:30 p.m.

Presidential Inaugural events kick off Wednesday, Oct. 23 in conjunction with Homecoming starting with the Presidential Processional at 11 a.m., and the Mr. and Miss TSU Coronation and Ball at 7 p.m. in Kean Hall.

Events continue on Thursday, Oct. 24 with the Inaugural Ecumenical Prayer Breakfast at 7:30 a.m., a service of fellowship bringing together leaders of the faith community to impart well wishes and solidarity to President Glenda Glover and the TSU community. The day continues with the Inaugural Symposium on the Common Core State Standards at 10 a.m. at the Avon Williams campus Auditorium, and Homecoming Concert at 7 p.m. in Kean Hall.  A special “From the Rough,” movie premiere and reception round out the evening beginning at 5:30 p.m., and is an exclusive invite only presentation of the inspiring film based on the true story of Dr. Catana Starks, a former Tennessee State University swim coach, who became the first woman ever to coach a college men’s golf team.

Friday, Oct. 25 begins with the Investiture of President Glenda Baskin Glover as 8th President of the University beginning at 9 a.m. in the Howard Gentry Complex. Homecoming events include the Charles Campbell Fish Fry on the President’s Lawn at 11 a.m., the annual Pep Rally at 11:45 a.m. in Hale Stadium, and the TSU Pan-Hellenic Step Show at 5 p.m. in the Gentry Complex. Tickets are $10 for students in advance, $15 at the door. The night ends with the Inaugural Reception and Scholarship Gala beginning at 6 p.m. at the Gaylord Opryland Resort.

Saturday, Oct. 26 begins with the Homecoming Parade beginning at 8 a.m., followed by the Showcase of Bands at 2 p.m. at LP Field. The Homecoming football game between TSU and Eastern Illinois kicks off at 4 p.m. at LP Field. Fans attending the game are asked to review the tailgating guidelines.

View the complete list of alumni, student, reunion and inaugural events.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University
With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU Holds Common Core State Standards Symposium Oct. 24

TNCORE logoNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will hold an Inaugural Symposium, addressing the Common Core State Standards. The symposium, titled, “The Common Core Standards and Tennessee Higher Education: Challenges, Opportunities, Resources, Equity (CORE)” will feature panelists from the federal, state and local levels.

The symposium takes place Thursday, Oct. 24 at the Avon Williams Campus auditorium beginning at 10 a.m., and is free and open to the public. Discussions will focus on the standards’ deployment, teacher preparation, curriculum development and impact on higher education in Tennessee.

The topic, selected by TSU President Glenda Glover for the academic symposium on the occasion of her inauguration, is an expression of a focus on teacher education that began with Tennessee State University’s founding and remains central to its mission today.  The Common Core State Standards aspire to the vision of providing an internationally competitive, career and college-focused, quality education for all students in the state of Tennessee.

“Meaningful steps toward this vision have never been easy, but the faculty, staff, administration, students and alumni of Tennessee State University have significantly reduced the distance toward this goal since 1912,” said Dr. Evelyn Nettles, associate vice president of Academic Affairs and symposium committee co-chair.  “The primary purpose of this symposium is to communicate – to teachers, parents, and all members of our educational community – the University’s ongoing dedication to this mission as we begin our second century.”

The symposium’s discussion will focus on the national conversation regarding the standards and the following themes: the challenges of moving toward higher-level skills and deeper learning and the new opportunities for collaboration offered by a common educational effort across most of the country.

“In addressing these themes, the symposium adds a practical focus on resources at the federal, state and local level,” added Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College of Engineering and symposium committee co-chair, “including the commitment of the University’s College of Education to serve as an ongoing resource for Tennessee educators in implementing the standards and realizing their benefits for students.”

According to Nettles, the symposium’s fourth theme of equity expresses the ideal of the Common Core State Standards – an educational system in which all students can move between schools, between states, or into college without surmounting enormous shifts in expectations – as well as an ethical commitment necessary in at least some measure for their success.

To accompany the symposium, a common core module will be available on-line for practicing educators and pre-selected teacher candidates that focuses on developing effective lesson plans using differentiated instruction. The module will be self-paced and offers 1 CEU for 10 hours of online contact.

“The module will provide teachers the tools to create lesson plans based on different backgrounds of the students in their classroom,” said Dr. Heraldo Richards, associate dean of the College of Education. “This will allow teachers to help students reach their potential while addressing the Common Core State Standards.”

The symposium moderator and featured panelists include:

Moderator:

Vicki Yates, News Channel 5 Anchor

Panelists:

Dr. Peggy Carr
Associate Commissioner, Assessment Division
National Center for Education Statistics

Kevin S. Huffman, J.D.
Commissioner
Tennessee Department of Education

Jamie Woodson, J.D.
President and Chief Executive Officer
Tennessee State Collaborative on Reforming Education (SCORE)

For more information, contact Nettles or Hargrove at 615.963.7001.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU Lecture Series Presents The Allies and the Holocaust Oct. 17

10 April 2013, Headshot of Joseph White, Research Assistant
Dr. Joseph White

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University and the Samuel Shannon Distinguished Lecture Series presents, “The Allies and the Holocaust,” Thursday, Oct. 17 at 2:40 p.m. in room 163 in the Research and Sponsored Programs building. The lecture is free and open to the public.

During the lecture, Dr. Joseph White, research assistant with the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, will share his expertise on the Holocaust, and discuss what the Allies knew and when they knew it, and will outline what intelligence on the Holocaust was available to the Western Allies and when. In the process, White distinguishes between information and knowledge on how the Allies reacted to the intelligence.

White is a contributor to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Encyclopedia of Camps and Ghettos, and edits Volume 3, The Camps and Ghettos of European Regimes aligned with Nazi Germany. He has published numerous articles on Nazi camps in Holocaust and Genocide Studies; Journal of Jewish Identities; PRISM: An Interdisciplinary Journal for Holocaust Educators; and Evoking Genocide: Researchers and Activists Describe the Works of Art and Media that Changed Their Lives.

He holds a Ph.D. in Modern European history from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and a B.A. and M.A. in history from Georgia State University.

The Samuel Shannon Lecture Series is named in honor of Dr. Samuel H. Shannon who served on the TSU history faculty for more than 30 years. Shannon was an accomplished scholar and contributed to the intellectual life of the University by regularly inviting distinguished colleagues to campus to provide guest lectures for students and faculty. Under his leadership, the department’s lecture series evolved from a voluntary effort to a funded program of the University.

The goal of the series is to bring to the University scholars who exemplify excellence in teaching and scholarship in the fields of history, geography and political science.

For more information, contact Dr. Gashawbeza W. Bekele, assistant professor of Geography, at 615.963.5499.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU Faculty Members Selected as Top Professors at Affordable Colleges

Historically-Black-CollegesNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Two faculty members at Tennessee State University have been recognized as two of the top professors for national and international recognition for their work in research – and in the classroom.

Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture, Natural and Human Sciences; and Dr. Terry Likes, chair of the Department of Communications, have been singled out as the best in their field as top professors at affordable Historically Black Colleges by Affordable Colleges Online.

According to the award, schools and professors on the list have an honored tradition of providing high quality education in the arts and sciences, and in recent years, creating programs that match the evolving career and academic aspirations of their students.

 

 

Dr. Chandra Reddy
Dr. Chandra Reddy

Reddy was recognized for the House Joint Resolution recognizing scholarly achievement from the Tennessee State Legislature in 2012. He has been serving as the dean of the College at TSU since 2008, and is the former dean of the School of Graduate Studies at Alabama A&M University.

 

Dr. Terry Likes
Dr. Terry Likes

Likes was recognized for the 2013 Journalism Educator of the Year award from the Southeast Journalism Conference he received earlier this year. He has captured 25 journalism awards at the national, regional, and state levels, including the 2013 National Association of Television Program Executives Fellowship.

Affordable Colleges Online helps students find affordable college options and provides information about financial aid and college rankings. All colleges and universities in the Affordable HBCU category, including TSU, are fully accredited institutions with annual tuition costs of less than $12,000, according to the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System.

Dean Reddy and Dr. Likes join the list of who’s who of top professors, including a professor/author in Fayetteville, Ark., renowned for her creations in children’s literature; a chemistry professor at a Maryland school who has received back-to-back awards from the Board of Regents or the Pine Bluff researcher who investigates the origins of the genetic code for NASA. Professors on the list have earned Golden Mike awards in broadcasting, American Association of Cancer Research awards, top honors in music performance, and awards from Departments of Homeland Security, and Agriculture. All demonstrate that students don’t have to sacrifice academic excellence in the name of affordability.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University
With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

Art Exhibit Displays Works of Mother, Daughter Duo

A Mirrored Creation of Life on Display at Avon Williams Campus Library through November 15

Mutually inspired by each other, Shea Moore’s photographs have inspired her mother, Cassandra Bennett to share her interpretation on canvas. The mother of this duo states that her daughter has the ability to capture on camera what is seen through the eyes of an artist. The art exhibit, A Mirrored Creation of Life: in Photographs and Oil, is on display at the Avon Williams campus library through November 15.

Mutually inspired by each other, Shea Moore’s photographs have inspired her mother, Cassandra Bennett to share her interpretation on canvas. The mother of this duo states that her daughter has the ability to capture on camera what is seen through the eyes of an artist. The art exhibit, A Mirrored Creation of Life: in Photographs and Oil, is on display at the Avon Williams campus library through November 15.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A new art exhibit is currently on display at the Tennessee State University Avon Williams campus library that features a mother and daughter duo.

Titled, A Mirrored Creation of Life: in Photographs and Oil, the exhibit is a collaboration of mother, Cassandra Bennett and daughter, Shea Moore, and features more than 20 original works of photography and oil paintings.

Nashville natives Bennett and Moore bring their love of art, design, fashion, family, music and makeup into this fascinating creation. Mutually inspired by each other, Moore’s photographs have inspired her mother, Bennett to share her interpretation on canvas. The mother of this duo states that her daughter has the ability to capture on camera what is seen through the eyes of an artist.

Bennett, the mother of five children, always encouraged her children to follow their dreams and their special gifts and talents. She started oil painting again in 2006 after placing it aside for many years. Bennett is a member of “The Society of Artist” at Artists on Main in Goodlettsville, Tenn., under the direction of David Gillihan, Art Instructor. Her work has been displayed at several galleries locally and nationally.

Trained as a fashion designer at Bauder College in Atlanta, Moore decided to leave to the corporate world two years ago to pursue her passion as a freelance makeup artist and photographer. Born and raised in Nashville, she was exposed to various aspects of art, design, fashion and music. She enjoys sharing experiences with others through her photos and allowing the viewer to create their own stories, emotions, and connections with each photo.

The exhibit is free and open to the public, and runs through November 15. The library is open Monday through Thursday 9 a.m. until 10 pm, Friday-Saturday 9 a.m. until 5:30 p.m., and Sunday noon until 8:30 p.m. For more information, call 615.963.7383.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU Hosts Entertainment Outreach Program Conference Oct. 29

“Leveraging Up!” workshop provides opportunity for students to meet, network with industry professionals

entertainment career fair

NASHVILLE, Tenn.  (TSU News Service) — Tennessee State University will host an entertainment industry college career conference and symposium Tuesday, Oct. 29, from 1:30 until 5 p.m. in The Forum, located in the Floyd Payne Campus Center.

The conference will bring entertainment industry leaders and professionals to the University in order to expose a diverse group of students to the industry while closing the gap between students and recruiters.

Leveraging UP, an entertainment organization dedicated to educating, recruiting and developing the next generation of industry leaders, innovators and visionaries of tomorrow will host a student prep workshop as well as bring some of the world’s leading media, entertainment and communication companies to the University.

Companies scheduled to be in attendance include DreamWorks Animation SKG, Sony, CBS Corporate, the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, Clear Channel and others.

According to organizers, this is an exceptional opportunity for students to meet and network with industry professionals. For students who desire to work in one of the many areas of the entertainment industry or who want to explore the possibilities that the entertainment industry offers, this conference is a must attend.

Students from all majors and backgrounds are invited to participate.  Industry leaders are seeking students from business, mass communications, engineering, technology, music, history, architecture, computer science, and art as well as other academic majors and disciplines.  The conference is for both undergraduates and graduate students.

The conference is free and open to students, and registration is advised. For more information, contact the TSU Career Development Center at 615.963.7527.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu