Category Archives: NEWS

TSU to Celebrate Best and Brightest Students During University Honors Convocation April 13

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – When it comes to academic achievement and excellence at Tennessee State University, Carla Gibbs and Lauren Thomas are part of an exclusive club.

As members of the University Honors Program, since entering TSU as freshmen four years ago, Gibbs, a Biology major from Miami, and Thomas, from Memphis, Tennessee, majoring in Mass Communications, have not averaged below a 3.0 grade point average.

2014-08-06 22.01.09
Carla Gibbs

Gibbs hold a 3.76 GPA and is a MARC Scholar, a National Institute of General Medical Sciences program designed to increase the number of minority scientists. She plans to attend Meharry Medical College to study internal medicine. For Thomas, she has already received graduate study offers from Northwestern University, Seattle University and Boston University to study public relations and management after a two-year commitment with Teach for America.

2014-08-06 21.24.26
Lauren Thomas

Gibbs and Thomas are part of more than 2,400 of the University’s best and brightest students who will be honored Monday, April 13, 9:30 a.m., when Tennessee State University holds its annual Honors Convocation in Kean Hall. TSU President, Dr. Glenda Glover, will be the keynote speaker.

According to Dr. D. McGahey, associate director of the University Honors Program, the 2,402 students with GPAs of 3.0 and above, is an 11 percent increase over the 2,016 who were honored last year. He said 92 of this year’s honorees have “perfect scores” of 4.0 GPAs, while 356 maintain GPAs between 3.75 -4.0.

“We are really excited about these outstanding students,” said Dr. Coreen Jackson, director of the Honors Program. “They are an example of what hard work is all about. We are excited to give them this well-deserved honor.”

Among those who will be honored are Honors Program Scholars, those on the Dean’s List, members of the University-Wide Honor Societies, Student Leadership Awards, the President’s List Scholars, and the Top Graduating Seniors. The ceremony will also include the presentation of private scholarship awards, such as the Dr. McDonald Williams Scholarship.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331
About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

2015 Ag Week to Commemorate 125th Anniversary of 1890 Land-Grant System

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – This year’s College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences Week will culminate with a Health Walk commemorating the 125th Anniversary of the Morrill Act of 1890, which created the land-grant system for universities and colleges including Tennessee State University.

Gilmore
State Representative Brenda Gilmore, a TSU alum and strong supporter, will make the opening statement at this year’s Ag Week in front of the new Agricultural and Biotechnology Building, at 8 a.m., Saturday, April 11.

On Saturday, April 11 at 8 a.m., the ceremony will kickoff in front of the Agricultural and Biotechnology Building on the main campus, with an opening statement by State Representative Brenda Gilmore, followed by the Health walk.

The 1890 land-grant system came into being with the signing of the Second Morrill Act for residents in primarily southern and border states who, because of their race, were denied admission to the publically-funded land-grant institutions that were founded in 1862. TSU, which was founded in 1912 as the Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial Normal School, became the designated recipient of Tennessee’s portion of 1890 land-grant funds in 1913.

The 125th anniversary observance event is part of a yearlong celebration among the 19 Black Land-Grant Colleges and Universities in the United States. The event will also include a national celebration in Washington, D.C. in July.

“The 1890 land-grant universities are a major education resource for the nation, and continue to be a key source for African-American leaders who render valuable service to their communities, the nation, and the world,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences.

For more information on the 1890 Land-Grant Colleges and Universities, visit www.1890universities.org.

Below is schedule of other events marking this year’s CAHNS Week:

  • Monday, April 6: Student Day
    • 9:30 – 10 — Refreshments
    • 10 – 2 — 1890 Land-Grant Celebration Agriculture Career Fair
    • 12 – 2 — Student Cookout
  • Tuesday, April 7: Ag & Env Sciences Day
    • 8 – 9:30 — Continental Breakfast (Lawson)
    • 9:30 – 10:30 — Guest Speakers (Farrell-Westbrook)
    • 11 – 12 — Demonstrations
    • 1:30 – 3 Lab Tours
    • 3 – 5 — Student Professional Development Workshop (AITC)
  • Wednesday, April 8: Biological Sciences Day
    • 8:30 – 9:25 — Registration
    • 9:30 – 10:30 — Guest Speakers (McCord 206)
    • 10:30 – 12 — Tours and Poster Exhibit
    • 1 – 2:30 — Program (Floyd Payne Forum 210)
    • 2:30 – 3:30 – Reception
  • Thursday, April 9: Chemistry Day
    • 8:30 – 9:30 — Registration & Refreshments (Boswell 106)
    • 9 – 12 — Chemistry Career Fair (Boswell 122)
    • 9:15 – 10 — Tours
    • 11:15 – 12:15 — Chemistry Challenge (Boswell 12)
    • 12 – 2 — Poster Presentations
    • 2:20 – 3:45 — Guest Speaker (Boswell 12)
  • Friday, April 10: College Recognition Day
    • 12 – 2 — Awards Luncheon (Farrell-Westbrook 118)
    • Saturday: 1890 Land-Grant 125th Anniversary Healthwalk
    • 7 -8 — Registration and set-up
    • 8 – 10 — 5k and Health Walk
    • 10 -11 — Fellowship and Awareness Campaign
  • Wednesday, April 15: Family and Consumer Sciences Week of the Young Child
  • 9 – 11 — North Nashville Childcare Centers Community Event (Ag Complex Circle)Department of Media Relations
    Tennessee State University
    3500 John Merritt Boulevard
    Nashville, Tennessee 37209
    615.963.5331
    About Tennessee State UniversityWith more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Debaters Rank Among The Top In The Country At National Tournament

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The Tennessee State University Forensics Team argued its way to success at the International Public Debate Association’s 2015 National Tournament hosted at Boise State University March 27-29.

ForensicsF
Kavon Coleman, left, Barbara Dudley, Ricky Madden, and Kevon Graves will travel next to Portland, Oregon to compete in the American Forensic Association National Tournament, and Athens, Ohio, in the National Forensic Association National Tournament.

Sophomores Ricky Madden, from Kansas City, Missouri, and Barbra Dudley, from Indianapolis, both advanced to elimination rounds. Madden, competing in the Novice Division, advanced to triple-octafinals before being eliminated by the eventual national champion, Middle Tennessee State University student, Leigh Stanfield. Dudley advanced to Quarterfinals in the Professional division, finishing in a tie for fifth place in the tournament with season-long national champion Allison Pulliam of Union University.

“This is only the second year that TSU has had a debate team and they continue to perform exceptionally well,” said Adam Key, assistant director of Forensics and debate coach. “Last year, we had students ranked in the top 32 competitors in the Novice Division. This year, we had a student ranked in the top five of the organization’s toughest division.”

In addition to being ranked among the top competitors in the division, Dudley was the only competitor to defeat the tournament national champion, Chris Brown of the University of Arkansas at Monticello, at any point during the national tournament. Brown, who earned his fourth national title at the tournament, was complimentary of Dudley.

“She did great in our round,” Brown said. “I was really impressed.”

Also participating in competition were Kevon Graves, a freshman from Kansas City, Missouri, who competed in the Professional Division, and Kavon Coleman, a sophomore from Grand Rapids, Michigan, who was the team judge.

According to Key, both students were instrumental in the team’s success.

“We prepare cases as a team,” Key said. “Whether the student left with a trophy or not, every member of our team is responsible for our success.”

The IPDA National Tournament was the last outing for the TSU debate team for the year. The team will travel next to Portland, Oregon to compete in the American Forensic Association National Tournament, and Athens, Ohio, for the National Forensic Association National Tournament.

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TSU Debaters Argue Their Way to Success in First Tournament

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU Department Chair Wins Five Tennessee Associated Press Awards

Likes_pp
Dr. Terry Likes


NASHVILLE, Tenn.
(TSU News Service) – The 2015 awards presentation for the best journalism in broadcast and print was held March 28 in Nashville. Dr. Terry Likes, professor and chair of the Department of Communications, captured four first-place awards and one-second place.  Likes’ reports aired on the Tennessee Radio Network with a variety of topics ranging from the music, news and sports industries.

Likes’ honors included the following:

  • First Place, Best Sports Feature, Radio, “$ports + Money = Recession Proof.”
  • First Place, Best Light Feature, Radio, “The Alarm Clock For Your Favorite TV Show.”
  • First Place, Best Enterprise, Radio, “Copy and Paste: The Perils of Plagiarism in Higher Education.”
  • First Place, Best Use of Sound, Radio, “The Alarm Clock For Your Favorite TV Show.”
  • Second Place, Best Use of Sound, Radio, “$ports + Money = Recession Proof.”

Likes’ report on the “The Alarm Clock For Your Favorite TV Show” also won first place, Best of Competition from the Broadcast Education Association Faculty Audio Competition.

“It is an honor to represent TSU in this regard and to continue to enhance my reporting skills for the benefit of our students,” said Likes. “Evidence of current professional success helps in the classroom when students can see professors remain active in the industry, achieve at a high level while professors can encourage students to seek excellence in their own student competitions.”

This is the 19th Tennessee Associated Press award for Likes.  He has also won eight regional Edward R.  Murrow awards and is the recipient of 60 awards during his career including honors from the Broadcast Education association, Kentucky Associated Press, National Broadcasting Society and the National Press Club.

Since joining TSU in 2008, Likes has won 44 awards while his students have won 58 awards from the Tennessee Associated Press, Southeast Journalism Conference, Society of Professional Journalists and National Broadcasting Society.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Lady Tigers Honored with Resolution at State Capitol

Courtesy: Tennessee State Sports Information

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – With a rousing welcome, the Tennessee State University women’s basketball team was today honored at the State Capitol for winning the 2015 Ohio Valley Conference Tournament Championship.

OVC Champs
The Lady Tigers received a standing ovation as they entered the House Chamber at the State Capitol. Among those receiving the team and Coach Larry Inman, right, front, were Representative Brenda Gilmore, left, Representative Harold Love Jr., and House Speaker Beth Harwell.

The Lady Tigers were escorted into the House Chambers and celebrated with a standing ovation by the Tennessee House of Representatives. Once the team, coaches and administrators made it to the front of the room, Representative Harold M. Love, Jr., himself a TSU alum, presented the team with a Resolution for their accomplishments.

“When you talk about student athletes and the achievements that they make on and off the court, I think it is good for us to recognize them,” Love said “The Lady Tigers were not slated to win the OVC because of the other teams that maybe had better records or were presumed to be the champions, but to have the determination to go into the tournament and not let the other teams intimidate them is a testament to how we should live our lives… Not being intimidated by the circumstances we’re faced with and to keep on striving and pushing to achieve our goals.”

After the Resolution was read and presented to the team, Head Coach Larry Inman addressed the House. “This is such a great honor. The ladies on this team are about more than just basketball. They are good students in the classroom and in life. They are all going to be very successful people serving the communities that they represent. And what representatives they were for Nashville and the state of Tennessee.”

Women's Basketball-10
Senator Thelma Harper, an alum and die-hard Tiger fan, in hat, joins Representative Brenda Gilmore, Coach Larry Inman, and TSU Assistant Vice President for Public Relations and Communications Kelli Sharpe for a photograph with the team in front of the State Capitol.

 

As the Lady Tigers left the Capitol, they were congratulated by a number of Tennessee State supporters and alumni, including Senator Thelma Harper and Representative Brenda Gilmore, who took photos with the team.

“I’m very proud of these young ladies who have gone above and beyond the call of duty, so to speak,” Inman added. “They’ve worked extremely hard and have been very successful. Their lives have touched so many and I’m so proud of them and what they’ve accomplished. I’m thankful to the Legislative body of Tennessee that recognized that.”

Tennessee State defeated UT Martin on March 7 in the Ohio Valley Conference Tournament Championship to claim the program’s first OVC crown in 20 years.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331
About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Alum Named Regional Teacher of the Year

Whitney Bradley (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – An alumna from Tennessee State University was recently named one of the best teachers in the state, selected by her peers as one who is, “leading the charge and making a real difference for students.”

Whitney Bradley, a teacher at Bailey STEM Magnet Middle School in Nashville, was named Teacher of the Year at her school and will compete for the Metro Nashville Public Schools district-wide Middle School Teacher of the Year. She was also named the Teacher of the Year for the Tennessee’s Mid-Cumberland region and will compete for the Tennessee Teacher of the Year award later this year.

“I am humbled,” said Bradley after winning these awards. “It is a blessing to bring positive attention to the school and to this community. I am honored because people count out our students and staff all the time and now we get to celebrate the goodness of Bailey Middle School and urban educators.”

Bradley, who graduated from TSU in 2009 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in English, is in her second year as an eighth grade team leader at Bailey. She has also held positions at White Creek High School, and served as co-director of Camp Wisdom Summer enrichment program.

Bradley said that for her, teaching is a calling or a ministry of sorts. She loves working with the, “least of these,” because they need it the most.

“I love to see my (students) smash the menial expectations placed on them just because of their backgrounds or life circumstances,” she added. “They are lights and when they own it, I love it.”

Bradley is an instructional leader at Bailey, which allows her to work with students, and help mentor and lead a group of her colleagues to improve instructional practice through the, “Learning Through Practice” approach.

“This approach I can attribute to my days at TSU,” Bradley said. “Tennessee State taught me the value of professional collaboration and networking. I believe in highlighting the good in my team members so that we all shine together.

Working as a team allows teachers to teach to their own strengths. We hold each other accountable. “We work together to make sure the students understand the content.”

She said she also learned valuable “life lessons” at TSU, which she carried into the classroom, specifically citing Dr. Samantha Curtis, director of the Write program, who taught her about time management and not to forget what is important to her personally.

“It’s all about pacing,” said Bradley. “Dr. Curtis taught me that everyone doesn’t want 100 percent of me 100 percent of the time. That lesson has been invaluable in my classroom and at home. I love my students and give my all when I am teaching, but I still have some love left over for my son and loved ones at the end of the day. Its all about balance.”

All Teachers of the Year, including Bradley, will be celebrated at a formal dinner and awards ceremony May 11 at Lipscomb University’s Allen Arena, where district-level winners will be chosen.

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Going the Extra Mile to Help Students Succeed Earns TSU Professor Nashville Business Journal’s Top “40 Under 40” Selection

WinstonPicture[1]NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The 2015 winners of Nashville Business Journal’s Top 40 Under 40 were asked to share a hidden talent. Tameka Winston revealed that she has always loved fashion. In her spare time she enjoys serving as a fashion stylist for friends and family.

But while the Tennessee State University alum loves to see others look and feel their best, her passion is far from the glamour of style, lip gloss, clothes and the accessories that go with them.

“Teaching is what makes me the happiest,” said Winston, a professor in the Department of Communications at Tennessee State University. “I enjoy teaching my students. Just working with them, and seeing them succeed give me a special joy.”

That drive to help students be their best has earned the young professor the respect of not just her students and peers; the Nashville community has also taken notice.

Recently, the Nashville Business Journal selected Winston as one of the city’s “Top 40 Under 40” professionals for 2015. The paper described Winston, 36, and her fellow winners in the Class of 2015 as people “deemed to be making a difference” in their professional areas and the Nashville community.

“For starters, they are all making a difference in their industry and community, and they all have yet to reach their 40th birthday,” the paper added.

Winston, who teaches a variety of undergraduate-level courses in her eight-year career as a professor at TSU, also advises and mentors many students, something that has also earned her accolades from students and the College of Liberal Arts, in which she teaches.

In 2012 she was named “Professor of the Year” by the college. Colleagues and students say Winston’s passion for teaching goes beyond the classroom. Her personal touch, they say, makes her stand out even more.

“Dr. Winston shows great wisdom inside as well as outside of the classroom,” said Kimarcus Thomas, a junior Mass Communications major, who has known Winston for the last three years. “I remember having class with her for the first time my freshman year. Right then I knew that I wanted her to be my mentor. Dr. Winston strives in excellence and she pushes her students to do great things. She’s a blessing to the Mass Communications Department.”

Colleagues, especially those who have known Winston for a longer period are just as enthusiastic about her achievement, her approach to teaching and her “special touch” with students.

“I am extremely excited that Dr. Tameka Winston was selected as one of Nashville’s ‘40 Under 40’ for 2015,” said Joseph Richie, director of the Center for Media Arts and Production at TSU. “As a colleague who has witnessed her meteoric rise in higher education, she personifies what it means to be a professor, scholar and creator in the field of mass communication. Congratulations!”

“She is well deserving of this award,” another student, Brittiany Betts, a Communications major, added. “Dr. Winston is an exceptional teacher. She is someone I have grown very close to and really can talk to her about anything.”

Winston, an avid writer, is the co-author of a textbook, “Understanding the Speechmaking Process,” which is being used for a public speaking course at the University. She also developed the print journalism curriculum for the Communications department, which incorporates new media technologies and multimedia convergence.

In addition to teaching and scholarly research, Winston serves as the creator, executive producer and host for two radio programs on Sirius Satellite, “Black Docs” and “Tennessee State Talk,” which are intended to ensure active involvement in the community. The show, “Black Docs,” says Winston, offers an opportunity for a counter-narrative to the negative images of women in the media, while “Tennessee Talk” is designed to empower the TSU community and discuss matters related to the University.

As an academic auditor for the Tennessee Board of Regents, Winston says these involvements outside the classroom are all part of the combined process intended to develop students who are well rounded, by opening them to opportunities for successful careers. Winston will also be traveling to the Broadcast Education Association Conference In Las Vegas, Nevada on April 13-15, 2015 to present research.

“I strongly believe in helping students become their ‘best’ selves, identify their passion, and be able to live in their strengths,” said Winston.

The Mississippi native holds a doctorate degree and an Educational Specialist Degree from TSU. She has a Master’s Degree from Austin Peay State University, and a B.A. from Alcorn State University.

When This Nashville “40 Under 40” is not at work, she enjoys spending time with her husband and traveling.

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

37th Annual University-Wide Research Symposium Continues Through April 3

Eleanor Fleming, chronic epidemiologist with the U.S. Public Health Service, featured speaker

 

Dr. Eleanor Fleming
Dr. Eleanor Fleming

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The University-Wide Research forum continues today as undergraduate and graduate students present oral presentations on their research to the faculty, other students and members of the community. Presentations take place at the Research and Sponsored Programs building throughout the day. In addition, student and faculty research posters will be on display at Jane Elliott Hall through Thursday, April 2.

The Research Symposium also celebrates College of Health Sciences Day at the Avon Williams Campus. Dr. Eleanor Fleming, United States Public Health Service, will be the featured speaker and will discuss, Closing the Gaps in Chronic Disease Disparities. The discussion begins at 2:15 p.m. at the AWC Auditorium and is open to the public.

Fleming is a dental officer in the USPHS, working for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as a chronic disease epidemiologist. A native of Franklin, Tennessee, Fleming received her undergraduate and doctoral training in Political Science at Vanderbilt University, her Doctor of Dental Surgery degree with a Health Policy certification from Meharry Medical College, and in May, will receive her Master of Public Health degree in Epidemiology from Tennessee State University.

Every year, Tennessee State University students present their best works of exploration, research and invention to fellow students, faculty and the community at the Annual University-Wide Research Symposium. Now in its 37th year, the symposium is taking place at the University today through April 3.

Events taking place during the week include:

Wednesday, April 1

Oral Presentations:

9 am – Noon               Graduate Sciences V (Human, Life, Natural and Physical), RSP 163

9 am – 12:15 pm         Undergraduate Engineering, RSP 161

9 am – 11:45 am          Undergraduate Sciences (Human, Life, Natural and Physical), RSP 209

Thursday, April 2

Poster Presentations:

Posters will be displayed in the Jane Elliott Hall Auditorium – March 31 – April 2

 9 am – 11 am               Faculty Poster Session, Jane Elliott Hall Auditorium

9 am – 11 am               Graduate Poster Session and Judging, Jane Elliott Hall Auditorium

1 pm – 3 pm               Undergraduate Poster Session and Judging, Jane Elliott Hall Auditorium

Friday, April 3

Oral Presentations:

9 am – 11:30 am          Faculty, RSP 163

Noon – 2 pm               Awards Luncheon and Closing Ceremony

James E. Farrell-Fred E. Westbrook Building, 118

Luncheon, Student and Research Mentor Awards, $1million Research Club Award

Speaker: Amos L. Otis, Founder, President and CEO, SoBran Inc.

For more information on the Research Symposium, visit www.tnstate.edu/research or contact Nannette Carter Martin, co-chair at 615.963.5827, or Tamara Rogers, co-chair at 615.963.1520.

 

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Sobran CEO Amos L. Otis Featured Speaker to Close Out Research Symposium April 3

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Receives Official Designation as a Certified Vets Campus

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) –Tennessee State University today received its official designation as a Certified “Vets Campus.”

The University first received word of the distinction during the Veterans Day ceremony on Nov. 11, 2014 when Dr. Mark Hardy, vice president of Academic Affairs, announced the award.

Tom Morrison, the Tennessee Higher Education Commission Assistant Executive Director for Veterans Education, presents the title and certificate of designation to President Glenda Glover, officially declaring TSU a certified "Vets Campus."  (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
Tom Morrison (right), the Tennessee Higher Education Commission Assistant Executive Director for Veterans Education, presents the title and certificate of designation to President Glenda Glover, officially declaring TSU a certified “Vets Campus.” (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

At a special recognition ceremony on the Avon Williams Campus this morning, TSU President Glenda Glover called the designation a “monumental achievement” not only for Tennessee State University but also for the entire community.

“This recognition is a fulfillment of our goal to make Tennessee State University a top destination for veterans,” Dr. Glover said. “This was made possible after much work, including surveys, student orientation and mentoring to make sure we had everything in place to ensure that veterans coming to TSU are provided the necessary environment and resources to ease their transition. I am honored to accept this award on behalf of TSU.”

Presenting the certificate and letter if designation to Dr. Glover, the Tennessee Higher Education Commission Assistant Executive Director for Veterans Education, Tom Morrison, said the organization was highly appreciative of TSU’s commitment and dedication to veterans.

“Veterans play a very important role in our nation, and we are thankful to Tennessee State University for its commitment to ensure the educational wellbeing of people who have served our country,” Morrison said.

He estimated that TSU currently has about 200 veterans who are enrolled on the GI Bill. “I am happy to present this title and certificate designating Tennessee State University as a Certified Vets Campus,” Morrison added.

During last year’s Veteran Day ceremony when the award was announced, Hardy explained that Vets Campus designation recognizes the institution’s efforts toward increasing the educational attainment of student veterans.

Passed into law in 2014, the Tennessee Veterans Education Transition Support (VETS) Act created an honorary program classification for state colleges and universities that effectively foster a supportive environment for veterans.

This “VETS Campus” means that the University provides support services especially for veterans to ease their transition from military service to college life; some are transitioning from military life to civilian life while adjusting to the ins and outs of college. Many are nontraditional students with spouses and children, who need help in navigating their way. We help them find resources or put them in the right direction for help to make their educational experience more rewarding.”

To attain the “Vets Campus” designation, schools must meet statutory criteria, including the facilitation of support and mentoring programs for veterans, in addition to ensuring academic credit is received for skills and training received during military service.  Schools must also educate faculty and staff about veterans’ culture, including information on the combat-related mental or physical disabilities many soldiers face during and after their service.

Today’s ceremony included several senior university officials, among them Dr. Evelyn Nettles, associate vice president for Academic Affairs, who thanked the various departments and individuals who were instrumental in making the designation possible.

 

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Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

THEC to Present Certified Veterans Campus Award to Tennessee State University March 31

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The Tennessee Higher Education Commission will formally present Tennessee State University with the Certified “Vets Campus” designation Tuesday, March 31 during a special recognition ceremony beginning at 10 a.m. at the Avon Williams Campus.

The University first received word of the distinction during the Veterans Day ceremony on Nov. 11, 2014 when Dr. Mark Hardy, vice president of Academic Affairs, announced the award.

The designation recognizes the institution’s efforts toward increasing the educational attainment of student veterans. Passed into law in 2014, the Tennessee Veterans Education Transition Support (VETS) Act created an honorary program classification for state colleges and universities that effectively foster a supportive environment for veterans.

This “VETS Campus” designation recognizes institutions that dedicate resources toward helping Veterans transition from military service to enrollment in a higher education institution.

“This designation means that the University provides support services especially for veterans to ease their transition from military service to college life,” Hardy said. “Some are transitioning from military life to civilian life while adjusting to the ins and outs of college. Many are nontraditional students with spouses and children, who need help in navigating their way. We help them find resources or put them in the right direction for help to make their educational experience more rewarding.”

To attain the “Vets Campus” designation, schools must meet statutory criteria, including the facilitation of support and mentoring programs for veterans, in addition to ensuring academic credit is received for skills and training received during military service.  Schools must also educate faculty and staff about veterans’ culture, including information on the combat-related mental or physical disabilities many soldiers face during and after their service.

Russ Deaton, interim Executive Director of THEC, and Tom Morrison, Assistant Executive Director of Veterans Education, are scheduled to make the formal presentation. Media interested in covering the event should call the Department of Media Relations at 615.963.5331.

 

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Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.