Category Archives: NEWS

Tennessee State University Men’s Golf Team Ranked Among the Top 25 in the Nation

Courtesy: Tennessee State Sports Information

Foultz and Stout
Jermey Fultz, left, has claimed two top 20 finishes in the young season, while Andy Stout, right, earned a spot in the top-5 at the Black College Hall of Fame Tournament.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – The Tennessee State University men’s golf team boasts the 24th ranked freshman class in the country, according to Golfstat.com. The combination of Jermey Fultz (Knoxville, Tennessee.) and Andy Stout (Manchester, Tennessee.) has teamed for a 73.50 average and a Relative Strength rating of 208.953.

“I can’t say I am surprised by their performance,” Coach Parrish McGrath said. “This is what I expected when I brought them to TSU.”

The Tigers are the lone Ohio Valley Conference program to currently be ranked in the Freshman Top 25.

The University of Nevada holds down the top spot and is followed by North Carolina, Wake Forest, Southern California and SMU. Rounding out the Top 10 were, Northwestern, Oregon, Illinois, California and Southern Utah.

Fultz has claimed two top 20 finishes in the young season, while Stout earned a spot in the top-5 at the Black College Hall of Fame Tournament. Earlier in the week, Stout placed one spot ahead of Fultz as they finished 12th and 13th, respectively.

Stout ranks eighth in the OVC, tied with senior James Stepp, with a 72.8 average. Fultz is tied for 11th in the conference at 73.1.

”I’m glad they have been able to make the transition to the collegiate level,” said McGrath. “I believe it is going to be the beginning of many accolades for these two young gentlemen.”

The Tigers are third as a team with a 292.5 average, behind UT Martin (290.8) and Eastern Kentucky (291.1). Defending conference champions, Jacksonville State, has posted a 279.0 average in three rounds played, two shy of the minimum number of rounds to be ranked in the OVC.

“They have definitely been a spark for the rest of the team,” McGrath stated. “The newcomers have helped motivate the squad to increase their game. We look at things with a new attitude when it comes to the teams we feel we can compete against.”

TSU returns to action on Monday, Oct. 20, at the F&M Bank APSU Intercollegiate in Hopkinsville, Kentucky.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Greats Recognized as Pioneers at Annual Humanitarian Breakfast

TSU educators and civil rights pioneers Carrie Gentry (l) and Inez Crutchfield (r) were honored for their service to others during the 10th Annual James "Tex" Thomas  (center) Humanitarian prayer breakfast. The ceremony, held at the Northwest Family YMCA, also honored TSU women's and Olympic track coach Ed Temple.
TSU educators and civil rights pioneers Carrie Gentry (l) and Inez Crutchfield (r) were honored for their service to others during the 10th Annual James “Tex” Thomas (center) Humanitarian prayer breakfast. The ceremony, held at the Northwest Family YMCA, also honored TSU women’s and Olympic track coach Ed Temple. (photo by  John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Local, state and national politicians, as well as community leaders and friends paid tribute to three legends from Tennessee State University today for their service to others at the 10th Annual James “Tex” Thomas Humanitarian Prayer breakfast.

The ceremony was held at Nashville’s Northwest Family YMCA.

Civil rights pioneers and educators, Inez Crutchfield and Carrie Gentry, as well as legendary Olympic and TSU women’s track coach, Ed Temple, were honored for their commitment to their students, the community and fighting for the rights of others.

“The people we honor today were pioneers in the classroom, on the track and in the civil rights movement,” said Lelan Statom, master of ceremony and News Channel 5 meteorologist. “It is fitting that we honor these local humanitarians for their contributions to the Nashville community.”

Crutchfield, an assistant professor for health education at Tennessee State University from 1949 to 1985, and Gentry, an educator and wife of Howard Gentry Sr., the 12th head football coach for the TSU Tigers, were involved in the nonviolent civil rights movement in Nashville during the 1960s. They later became involved in the League for Women Voters, and were the first African-American members of the Davidson County Democratic Women.

In accepting her award, Crutchfield gave thanks for the recognition, and added that she could not have done everything alone. She had the help of “a special friend.”

“You have been my best friend for 60 years Carrie,” she said. “We’ve done it together and I love you.”

Crutchfield said the recognition was an honor since it was coming from members of her own community.

“It is especially wonderful to receive this honor by people who know me, my struggles, and what we have been able to accomplish,” she said. “This means the world to me.”

Gentry, who came to then Tennessee A&I College in 1949 with her husband, taught rhythmic and modern dance at the University, and later, along with Crutchfield, became influential in the effort to desegregate Nashville, aiding student protestors during the nonviolent civil rights movement.

“I really feel humbled today standing among so many worthy people, and you my friend, Inez (Gentry),” she said. “As I stand here today, I think about all the people that helped me move along the way. I want to thank everyone for the honor and praise. It’s a tribute to my family who helped me succeed.”

Ed Temple

TSU women’s and Olympic track coach, Ed Temple, was also recognized for his success on and off the track with the Tigerbelles and Olympic athletes during his 41 years at the University.

Temple led more than 40 athletes to Olympic competitions, bringing home a 
total of 23 Olympic medals (13 gold, six silver, and four bronze). His teams also won 34 national team titles and 30 
Pan-American Games medals.

“His success on the track and in the classroom will never be matched,” said Alfred Degrafinreid, TSU alumnus and counsel for U.S. Congressman Jim Cooper, as he spoke on behalf of Temple, who was unable to attend the ceremony.

Also on the program was TSU legendary golf coach, Dr. Catana Starks, who spoke on the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the need for programs to help address the difficult task of overweight children and obesity.

The annual prayer breakfast is a Northwest Family YMCA fundraising event that benefits the Y’s annual Giving Campaign. Past honorees include community leader Richard Lewis and State Representative, Brenda Gilmore.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU debaters argue their way to success in first tournament

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The Tennessee State University Forensics team began the 2014-2015 season with success in debate at the University of Arkansas at Monticello “Weevil Wars” debate tournament in Monticello, Arkansas on October 3-5.

TSU forensics debaters, Ricky Madden (L) and Barbara Dudley , advanced to elimination rounds in the Novice division of the Weevil Wars debate tournament held at the University of Arkansas. It was the debate team's first tournament of the year where they competed against more than 100 students from 15 different universities. (courtesy photo)
TSU forensics debaters, Ricky Madden (L) and Barbara Dudley , advanced to elimination rounds in the Novice division of the Weevil Wars debate tournament held at the University of Arkansas. It was the debate team’s first tournament of the year where they competed against more than 100 students from 15 different universities. (courtesy photo)

Competing against more than 100 students from 15 universities including Jackson State University, Union University and Louisiana State University at Shreveport, Barbra Dudley,  a sophomore Economics major from Indianapolis, and Ricky Madden, a Kansas City freshman majoring in Criminal justice , advanced to the elimination rounds in the Novice division of the tournament.

Madden, who won five of six preliminary rounds, was eliminated in double-octafinals. Dudley was successful in two elimination rounds and finished ranked among the top eight competitors in the tournament as a quarterfinalist.

“I’m very happy to see this much progress from our students,” debate coach Adam Key said. “If we can continue on this track, I have no doubt we’ll see success on a national level sooner than later.”

The team will next compete this weekend at the University of Alabama “Crimson Classic” individual events tournament in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, before returning to host its annual “Music City Swing” tournament featuring both debate and individual events on October 17-19 on the Tennessee State University campus.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU College of Engineering Research Focus Prepares Graduates for Employment; Receives $1 Million DHS Grant for Data Sciences Study

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The College of Engineering is aggressively pursuing research in strategic areas that complement the engineering curriculums and prepare graduates for careers in emerging areas for employment and entrepreneurship.

One of those emerging areas is the field of Data Sciences and Analytics, a key focus of the college, which, according to Dean S. Keith Hargrove, meets the “huge” industry demand to manage “big data” and helps businesses optimize their operations to meet the needs of their customers.

“We have responded to this industry demand with the development of advanced courses, industry partners, and qualified faculty to create a curriculum for this discipline and concurrently conduct research for cyber-security, analytics, and data storage,” Hargrove said.

Graduate student Adrian Parker develops multi-physics simulation models for lithium ion batteries and uses special equipment for battery devices. (courtesy photo)
Graduate student Adrian Parker develops multi-physics simulation models for lithium ion batteries and uses special equipment for battery devices. (courtesy photos)

Adrian ParkerThis effort has yielded positive results, he noted. Recently, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security awarded the College of Engineering a $1 million grant to develop an integrated research and education program in data analytics. The award will be implemented in two phases over a period of six years.

Dr. Martene Stanberry, assistant professor of Mathematics, and Dr. Sachin Shetty, assistant professor of Electrical Engineering, will manage the program by combining their expertise and experience in cyber security and control systems research, as well as leveraging resources and facilities already available to them under the TIGER (TSU Interdisciplinary Graduate Engineering Research) Institute, directed by Dr. Hargrove.

Also, another team of researchers in the college has received funding to examine ways to improve the life of batteries. The team, including Drs. Lizhi Ouyang, Landon Onyebueke, Mohan Malkani and Hargrove, received $150,000 from the Naval Engineering Education Center of the U.S. Navy Sea System Command, and $80,000 from the Crane Naval Warfare Center in Indiana. The team will conduct multi-physics modeling of lithium ion batteries, and perform testing of electro-chemistries for performance and reliability. Also a part of the TIGER Institute, the project will involve undergraduate and graduate students.

Under the DHS program, the thrust of the study will involve the development of data analytic approaches for anomaly detection in critical infrastructure, that are based on the prior work of the faculty in scalable machine learning and optimal control systems, Hargrove said. He added that the education thrust would enhance the existing undergraduate Mathematical Sciences and Electrical and Computer Engineering programs through curriculum enhancement, student recruitment and retention, outreach, and collaborative relationships with DHS Centers of Excellence, industry, federal labs, and academia. Students will receive training in statistical analysis, machine-learning methods, and cloud computing and storage technologies used in manipulating, storing, and analyzing cyber data.

According to Hargrove, the need to capture, store, manage, and interpret massive amounts of data for decision making in today’s high-tech environment, is expected to grow exponentially within the next decade.

“The spending in ‘big-data’ is projected to increase from $27 billion from 2012 to $55 billion by 2016,” the dean said, adding, “It is therefore our responsibility to help train and educate a diverse workforce to enter these emerging career fields.”

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Alum and Lawyer Elected to Lead National Bar Examiners’ Board of Trustees

Brian Williams
Bryan Williams

NASHVILLE. Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University graduates continue to make major inroads in industry and the corporate and professional world.

Bryan Williams, senior partner of a New York City law firm who earned a B.S. degree from TSU in 1978, was recently elected chair of the Board of Trustees of the National Conference of Bar Examiners. The NCBE develops tests that are used as part of the bar examination in every jurisdiction in the United States.

A founding partner with Pettus and Williams, a Manhattan-based law firm, Williams is no stranger to the NCBE and the law profession. He was a longtime member of the Policy Committee for the Multistate Bar Examination, the organization’s flagship test that is administered in all states with the exception of Louisiana. In New York, he is a member of the State Board of Law Examiners.

Williams, who was elected at the August meeting of the NCBE, becomes only the second African-American male to chair the Board of Trustees in the organization’s 83-year history. He began his legal career as an assistant district attorney in the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office and practiced commercial litigation at the Wall Street law firms of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, and Deforest & Duer.

Attributing his career success and leadership skills to his TSU preparation, Williams said his new role will give him the opportunity to lead “a very distinguished board of attorneys” representing the entire country who are responsible for ensuring that new attorneys are qualified to practice law.

“Tennessee State University played an integral part in building my skills of leadership when I served as SGA president,” said Williams, who earned his law degree at Howard University, where he graduated cum laude.

“I will be forever grateful to TSU for giving me the foundation that has allowed me to succeed in the legal profession,” Williams added.

The Indianapolis native is a member of the New York State Bar Association Committee on the Bar Exam, the Howard Law Alumni Association, and the New York County Lawyers’ Association. A staunch supporter of his alma mater, Williams is a member of the New York Chapter of the Tennessee State University National Alumni Association, and a member of the President’s Society, a donor category of supporters who regularly give to the University.

Williams is also involved in a number of community, religious, and fraternal organizations, serving as a member of the Board of Deacons of the historic Canaan Baptist Church of Christ in Harlem and a past member of the Board of Directors of the Lakeland Education Foundation in Westchester County, New York. A life member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, he is general counsel to the fraternity’s Northeastern Province, a former president of the fraternity’s New Rochelle–White Plains Alumni Chapter, and a former chairman of the fraternity’s New York City Alumni Scholarship Foundation.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Marks 102nd Birthday With Procession, Speeches and Cheers

Unknown

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is 102 years old today.

President Glenda Glover, accompanied by keynote speaker, State Rep. Brenda Gilmore, led a procession of faculty, staff and students for a Founders’ Day celebration in Kean Hall, amid cheers from the audience and renditions from the University Marching Band.

“This is a great day for Tennessee State University,” said Dr. Glover, as she recounted events in the University’s history from its founding in 1912 to the role it plays today as a major center of education in the nation.

“From 1912 when the then Agricultural and Industrial Normal School for Negroes, built to provide educational opportunity for blacks, opened its doors to the first 247, TSU has maintained a tradition of excellence in education for a diverse population,” Dr. Glover said.

In her keynote address, Rep. Gilmore, a 1984 graduate of TSU, emphasized “Think, Work, Serve,” the University’s motto and its relevance in achieving success, but quickly pointed to pitfalls many face for misusing that success.

“TSU has helped to better the lives of so many and opened doors for countless others,” Gilmore said. “But many, including elected officials and others in key positions have failed because they end up hurting the very people they are supposed to help.”

Gilmore, a noted advocate for abused and special needs children, and a strong supporter of women’s cause, said many officials suffer what she called ethical lapses, either out of greed for power, wealth, disrespect for others or lack of integrity.

“As TSU graduates we are responsible to pass our good fortune to help those unfortunate ones in our community,” said Gilmore, who earned a B.S. degree in Business at TSU, before going on to earn a master’s degree in Human Resource Development at Vanderbilt University.

“Get involved in fruitful endeavors that improve your community; give back to the community that nurtured you; and reconnect yourselves to the TSU motto to make this world a better place,” added the four-term member of the Tennessee General Assembly from the 54th District in Davidson County.

Mr. and Miss TSU, accompanied by their Royal Court, and faculty members dressed in full regalia, added to the pomp in celebration of the founders and birthday of the University, which now boasts more than 9,000 students, up from 247, one hundred and two years ago.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU nursing student saves driver’s life with Heimlich maneuver

Courtesy WSMV Channel 4

Nancy Diaz
Nancy Diaz

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – A first-year nursing student at Tennessee State University is being called a hero after putting some of her classroom skills to use to save a man’s life.

Nancy Diaz has always dreamed of helping sick people. What she didn’t expect was to save a life with the Heimlich maneuver, one of the first skills she learned.

“I’ve never done it before so I was scared,” Diaz said. “I didn’t even know if I was doing it right or not, but I still decided to do it. Doing something is better than not doing anything at all.”

Last Thursday, Diaz was driving on Highway 431 near Joelton when the man in front of her suddenly began swerving on the road. He then came to a stop in the middle of both lanes.

“He was grabbing his neck, so I knocked on the window several times because I tried to open the door and it was locked,” Diaz said.

After convincing him to open the door, Diaz went to work.

Video Clip
Click to play video

“He got on his knees and I got behind him and started performing the Heimlich maneuver,” Diaz said. “After three or four pushes, something came out.”

The driver choked on a large chunk of an apple he swallowed by accident.

Diaz would not have even been on that road had she not forgotten her ID that day and had to drive back home.

“I think it must have been destiny or God, because that’s the first time I’ve ever forgotten by ID,” she said.

Already late for class, Diaz took off without even thinking to ask for the man’s name.

“He was thanking me like 50 times,” she said. “Then he asked me, ‘Is there anything I can do for you?’ I said, ‘Well, yes, when you’re driving, please don’t eat apples.'”

Copyright 2014 WSMV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

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Tyson Foods CEO Donnie Smith Wows TSU Students on Success, Corporate Culture and Leadership; Discusses Partnership Opportunities with University Officials

smith1.2
Donnie Smith, Tyson Foods President and CEO, speaks to students at TSU on Wednesday. (Photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)


NASHVILLE, Tenn.
(TSU News Service) – Developing corporate partnerships and relationships with industry leaders have been at the core of Dr. Glenda Glover’s vision since becoming president of Tennessee State University nearly two years ago.

This has included visits and talks with major corporations and businesses and invitations to their leaders to visit the TSU campus to see the kinds of preparations students are receiving to be ready for the job market.

“This is necessary not just because we want these corporations to give to the University, but it also helps to expose our students to industry’s best as well as offer them opportunities to develop job-ready skills through internships, cooperative assistantships, scholarships and employment opportunities,” Dr. Glover said.

Scholars
President Glenda Glover and Tyson Foods President and CEO Donnie Smith meet with Tom Joyner Foundation scholarship recipients following the check presentation. From left are, Bria Monk, Tyson CEO Smith, Kourtney Daniels, President Glover and David Conner. (Photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

And today, TSU students received a good dose of exposure and lecture on corporate culture and leadership when the President and Chief Executive Officer of Tyson Foods, Inc., a $42 billion, Fortune 500 Arkansas-based company, visited and spent an entire day interacting with students, administrators, faculty and staff on the main campus.

Donnie Smith, whose visit also included the presentation of scholarships to three TSU students, in a partnership with the Tom Joyner Foundation, said his visit was intended to broaden existing relationship with TSU and explore areas in which student preparation in agriculture and science are more aligned with Tyson’s needs.

“We want to continue to build the relationship deeper by developing a streamline of talents that is suited to our company’s needs,” said Smith, who added that about 12 TSU students have interned at Tyson in the last two years, while another was fully employed with the company.

In a meeting earlier in Dr. Glover’s office with senior administration members, President Glover welcomed Smith and his team, which included Holly Bourland, Corporate Recruitment Manager for Professional Employment.

The TSU team emphasized that student preparation remains the main focus of the University, “because TSU wants to have a broad footprint” on industry by putting out students with job-ready skills, and Tyson could be a major partner in that area.

“Our students are involved in cutting-edge research in many areas of agricultural production and food security that could be useful to your company,” Dr. Glover told the Tyson executives.

“We are doing breakthrough research on our campus,” added Dr. Lesia Crompton-Young, chief research officer and associate vice President for Research and Sponsored Programs. “If you see the kinds of research we are involved in you will find that we are doing things that surely correlate with what Tyson’s needs are.”

A visit and tour of the University’s new Agricultural Biotechnology Research Building provided the Tyson visitors a closer look at some of the cutting-edge research the University officials spoke about.

“This visit is a great opportunity for us,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, following a meeting with the Tyson president. “We are trying to connect student and research to corporate needs because we want our research to be relevant to the market needs.”

In a gathering with Business students, the Tyson CEO spoke about corporate leadership, understanding the needs of “team members” (employees), and how to stay ahead of the competition.

“At Tyson we like to win, but for us winning is to make great food and helping those in need,” said Smith, adding that hunger relief is a major part of what Tyson does.

On corporate culture, Smith reminded the student about what he called his five “Is” and three “Rs.”

“To be successful you must have ‘integrity,’ be ‘intelligent,’ ‘innovative,’ have ‘interpersonal skills’ and you must be ‘inspirational.’ To achieve these, you must learn to develop ‘relationships,’ be ‘resilient’ and ‘result’ oriented,” smith said.

At a luncheon with Dr. Glover, along with her Cabinet and deans, the Tyson group saw PowerPoint presentations of offerings and programs in the College of Business, and the College of Engineering.

Prior to the presentations, the Tyson chief executive presented a check for $7,500 to Briar Monk, a senior Agricultural Science major with a 3.65 GPA from Little Rock, Arkansas; Kourtney Daniels, a sophomore Food Biosciences and Technology major with a 4.0 GPA from Chicago; and David Connor, a junior Agricultural Science major with a 3.42 GPA from Birmingham, Alabama.

The money, with each student receiving $2,500, is the result of a partnership between Tyson Foods and the Tom Joyner Foundation called the TScholars Project, to offer scholarships and internship opportunities to selected students majoring in Agriculture and Business at four historically black colleges and universities. The schools, TSU, Florida A&M University, North Carolina A&T State University and the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, were selected because of their proximity to Tyson company facilities.

According to the Interim Director of the Career Development Center at TSU, Tina Reed, each scholarship recipient will receive a summer 2015 internship at Tyson Foods.

Before leaving the TSU campus, the CEO also met with an array of students in different disciplines in Poag Auditorium, where he reiterated his views on corporate culture and leadership.

Other University officials who participated in meetings with the Tyson CEO and his team include: Dr. Mark Hardy, vice president for Academic Affairs; Jean Jackson, vice president for Administration; Cynthia Brooks, vice president for Business and Finance; Dr. John Cade, vice president for Enrollment Management and Student Support Services; Dr. Alisa Mosley, associate vice president for Academic Affairs; Robin Tonya Watson, assistant vice president for Institutional Advancement; Kelli Sharpe, assistant vice president for Public Relations and Communications; Laurence Pendleton, University Counsel; and Dr. Cheryl Green, assistant vice president for Student Affairs.

Also attending today’s meetings were: Dr. Millicent Lownes-Jackson, dean of the College of Business; and Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College Engineering.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

City Approves Statue for TSU Coaching Legend Ed Temple

Courtesy of The Tennessean
Mike Organ, morgan@tennessean.com

TemplestatueNASHVILLE, Tenn. The decision to place a statue of Ed Temple at the Nashville Sounds’ new ballpark was intended to provide the most exposure for the legendary Tennessee State women’s track coach, Mayor Karl Dean said.

The mayor officially announced Tuesday that the statue, which will stand approximately 7 feet tall, will be erected in the entry plaza area on a greenway near First Tennessee Park that will run from the stadium to the state capitol.

“It’s on the greenway so it will be in an area where people will be running, and it’s a prominent area,” Dean said. “We’re proud of Ed Temple and we want people to know we’re proud of him, and I think that’s a good place for it.”

The statue is expected to be finished in time for the opening of the ballpark in April.

Temple, who celebrated his 87th birthday Monday, coached at TSU from 1953-1994 and the U.S. women’s Olympic track team in 1960 and 1964.

A total of 23 of his Tigerbelles won Olympic medals (13 gold), including Wyomia Tyus and Edith McGuire, who finished first and second in the 100-meter dash at the Tokyo Games and attended Tuesday’s ceremony.

The idea to build a statue came from Nashville businessman Bo Roberts.

“They told me about two years ago that they wanted to do this, and I thought they were just talking; I didn’t pay no attention to what they were saying,” Temple said. “Then about a year ago they brought it up again, and I still thought they were just talking until we had lunch with the sculptor at Swett’s (Restaurant) later on in the year. Then they got to talking and I said, ‘I think they mean business.’”

Temple said he likes that the statue will be in an area where people will run and exercise.

Roberts said several locations were considered before he and a group of city leaders settled on the ballpark.

“We were looking around at different locations and wanted to get one that was appropriate and fresh and had exposure to a lot of people,” Roberts said.

“In communicating with (Nashville Sports Authority executive director) Toby Compton and the mayor we looked at it and thought this was the perfect place at this new, exciting ballpark. It will be in the entry plaza area on the greenway, which is open 365 days a year.”

The sculptor, Brian Hanlon, unveiled a model of the statue.

“The reason this sculptor is important is that we have to create historical markers of people that made a difference,“ Hanlon said. “This statue is not for Ed Temple, it’s about coach Ed Temple and Tennessee State. There’s a very important difference. And in that way there is humility in it. Then you can inspire and educate.”

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Alumna and State Representative Brenda Gilmore to Speak at TSU’s Annual Founders’ Day Commemoration

State Rep. Brenda Gilmore
State Rep. Brenda Gilmore

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – State Rep. Brenda Gilmore, a graduate and staunch supporter of Tennessee State University, will return to her alma mater on Thursday, Oct. 2 as the keynote speaker at the University’s 2014 Founders’ Day celebration.

The ceremony will be held in Kean Hall on the main campus at 9 a.m.

Gilmore, a Democrat and four-term member of the Tennessee General Assembly, represents Tennessee’s 54th District in Davidson County. A native of Sumner County, she was first elected to the General Assembly in 2006.

The former Metro Councilwoman served in many other areas before becoming a state lawmaker. For 20 years she was the director of University Mail Services at Vanderbilt University. She also worked as a mortgage loan counselor for Fidelity Federal Savings & Loan Association, and director of the Postal Services Division of the State of Tennessee.

In the General Assembly, Gilmore chairs the Davidson County Delegation and is a member of the House Committees on Agriculture and Natural Resources, and Criminal Justice, and a member of the Agriculture and Natural Resources Subcommittee. She is also a member of the Assembly’s Joint Fiscal Review Committee.

Previously, Gilmore served as the chair of the Environment Committee, secretary of the Conservation and Environment Committee, member of the Commerce and Insurance, and Utilities, and Conservation Committees. She also served as chair of the Parks Committee, and as a Member of the Small Business Committee.

A recipient of several awards, Gilmore is noted for taking strong stands for women and children causes. Recently, she served as chair of the Capital Campaign for the Northwest YMCA, and helped raise $5 million for an indoor swimming pool and center renovations.

She has held seats on many community boards including serving as chair of the Senior Citizens Inc. Board, trustee of the board for Skyline Medical Center, and a member of the Board of Trust for Belmont University.

Gilmore holds a B.S. degree in Business Administration from TSU, and a master’s degree in Human Resource Development from Vanderbilt University. She is married to Harry Gilmore. They have one daughter, Erica Gilmore, a Metro Councilwoman.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.