Category Archives: NEWS

TSU nursing student saves driver’s life with Heimlich maneuver

Courtesy WSMV Channel 4

Nancy Diaz
Nancy Diaz

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – A first-year nursing student at Tennessee State University is being called a hero after putting some of her classroom skills to use to save a man’s life.

Nancy Diaz has always dreamed of helping sick people. What she didn’t expect was to save a life with the Heimlich maneuver, one of the first skills she learned.

“I’ve never done it before so I was scared,” Diaz said. “I didn’t even know if I was doing it right or not, but I still decided to do it. Doing something is better than not doing anything at all.”

Last Thursday, Diaz was driving on Highway 431 near Joelton when the man in front of her suddenly began swerving on the road. He then came to a stop in the middle of both lanes.

“He was grabbing his neck, so I knocked on the window several times because I tried to open the door and it was locked,” Diaz said.

After convincing him to open the door, Diaz went to work.

Video Clip
Click to play video

“He got on his knees and I got behind him and started performing the Heimlich maneuver,” Diaz said. “After three or four pushes, something came out.”

The driver choked on a large chunk of an apple he swallowed by accident.

Diaz would not have even been on that road had she not forgotten her ID that day and had to drive back home.

“I think it must have been destiny or God, because that’s the first time I’ve ever forgotten by ID,” she said.

Already late for class, Diaz took off without even thinking to ask for the man’s name.

“He was thanking me like 50 times,” she said. “Then he asked me, ‘Is there anything I can do for you?’ I said, ‘Well, yes, when you’re driving, please don’t eat apples.'”

Copyright 2014 WSMV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

check3

Tyson Foods CEO Donnie Smith Wows TSU Students on Success, Corporate Culture and Leadership; Discusses Partnership Opportunities with University Officials

smith1.2
Donnie Smith, Tyson Foods President and CEO, speaks to students at TSU on Wednesday. (Photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)


NASHVILLE, Tenn.
(TSU News Service) – Developing corporate partnerships and relationships with industry leaders have been at the core of Dr. Glenda Glover’s vision since becoming president of Tennessee State University nearly two years ago.

This has included visits and talks with major corporations and businesses and invitations to their leaders to visit the TSU campus to see the kinds of preparations students are receiving to be ready for the job market.

“This is necessary not just because we want these corporations to give to the University, but it also helps to expose our students to industry’s best as well as offer them opportunities to develop job-ready skills through internships, cooperative assistantships, scholarships and employment opportunities,” Dr. Glover said.

Scholars
President Glenda Glover and Tyson Foods President and CEO Donnie Smith meet with Tom Joyner Foundation scholarship recipients following the check presentation. From left are, Bria Monk, Tyson CEO Smith, Kourtney Daniels, President Glover and David Conner. (Photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

And today, TSU students received a good dose of exposure and lecture on corporate culture and leadership when the President and Chief Executive Officer of Tyson Foods, Inc., a $42 billion, Fortune 500 Arkansas-based company, visited and spent an entire day interacting with students, administrators, faculty and staff on the main campus.

Donnie Smith, whose visit also included the presentation of scholarships to three TSU students, in a partnership with the Tom Joyner Foundation, said his visit was intended to broaden existing relationship with TSU and explore areas in which student preparation in agriculture and science are more aligned with Tyson’s needs.

“We want to continue to build the relationship deeper by developing a streamline of talents that is suited to our company’s needs,” said Smith, who added that about 12 TSU students have interned at Tyson in the last two years, while another was fully employed with the company.

In a meeting earlier in Dr. Glover’s office with senior administration members, President Glover welcomed Smith and his team, which included Holly Bourland, Corporate Recruitment Manager for Professional Employment.

The TSU team emphasized that student preparation remains the main focus of the University, “because TSU wants to have a broad footprint” on industry by putting out students with job-ready skills, and Tyson could be a major partner in that area.

“Our students are involved in cutting-edge research in many areas of agricultural production and food security that could be useful to your company,” Dr. Glover told the Tyson executives.

“We are doing breakthrough research on our campus,” added Dr. Lesia Crompton-Young, chief research officer and associate vice President for Research and Sponsored Programs. “If you see the kinds of research we are involved in you will find that we are doing things that surely correlate with what Tyson’s needs are.”

A visit and tour of the University’s new Agricultural Biotechnology Research Building provided the Tyson visitors a closer look at some of the cutting-edge research the University officials spoke about.

“This visit is a great opportunity for us,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, following a meeting with the Tyson president. “We are trying to connect student and research to corporate needs because we want our research to be relevant to the market needs.”

In a gathering with Business students, the Tyson CEO spoke about corporate leadership, understanding the needs of “team members” (employees), and how to stay ahead of the competition.

“At Tyson we like to win, but for us winning is to make great food and helping those in need,” said Smith, adding that hunger relief is a major part of what Tyson does.

On corporate culture, Smith reminded the student about what he called his five “Is” and three “Rs.”

“To be successful you must have ‘integrity,’ be ‘intelligent,’ ‘innovative,’ have ‘interpersonal skills’ and you must be ‘inspirational.’ To achieve these, you must learn to develop ‘relationships,’ be ‘resilient’ and ‘result’ oriented,” smith said.

At a luncheon with Dr. Glover, along with her Cabinet and deans, the Tyson group saw PowerPoint presentations of offerings and programs in the College of Business, and the College of Engineering.

Prior to the presentations, the Tyson chief executive presented a check for $7,500 to Briar Monk, a senior Agricultural Science major with a 3.65 GPA from Little Rock, Arkansas; Kourtney Daniels, a sophomore Food Biosciences and Technology major with a 4.0 GPA from Chicago; and David Connor, a junior Agricultural Science major with a 3.42 GPA from Birmingham, Alabama.

The money, with each student receiving $2,500, is the result of a partnership between Tyson Foods and the Tom Joyner Foundation called the TScholars Project, to offer scholarships and internship opportunities to selected students majoring in Agriculture and Business at four historically black colleges and universities. The schools, TSU, Florida A&M University, North Carolina A&T State University and the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, were selected because of their proximity to Tyson company facilities.

According to the Interim Director of the Career Development Center at TSU, Tina Reed, each scholarship recipient will receive a summer 2015 internship at Tyson Foods.

Before leaving the TSU campus, the CEO also met with an array of students in different disciplines in Poag Auditorium, where he reiterated his views on corporate culture and leadership.

Other University officials who participated in meetings with the Tyson CEO and his team include: Dr. Mark Hardy, vice president for Academic Affairs; Jean Jackson, vice president for Administration; Cynthia Brooks, vice president for Business and Finance; Dr. John Cade, vice president for Enrollment Management and Student Support Services; Dr. Alisa Mosley, associate vice president for Academic Affairs; Robin Tonya Watson, assistant vice president for Institutional Advancement; Kelli Sharpe, assistant vice president for Public Relations and Communications; Laurence Pendleton, University Counsel; and Dr. Cheryl Green, assistant vice president for Student Affairs.

Also attending today’s meetings were: Dr. Millicent Lownes-Jackson, dean of the College of Business; and Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College Engineering.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

City Approves Statue for TSU Coaching Legend Ed Temple

Courtesy of The Tennessean
Mike Organ, morgan@tennessean.com

TemplestatueNASHVILLE, Tenn. The decision to place a statue of Ed Temple at the Nashville Sounds’ new ballpark was intended to provide the most exposure for the legendary Tennessee State women’s track coach, Mayor Karl Dean said.

The mayor officially announced Tuesday that the statue, which will stand approximately 7 feet tall, will be erected in the entry plaza area on a greenway near First Tennessee Park that will run from the stadium to the state capitol.

“It’s on the greenway so it will be in an area where people will be running, and it’s a prominent area,” Dean said. “We’re proud of Ed Temple and we want people to know we’re proud of him, and I think that’s a good place for it.”

The statue is expected to be finished in time for the opening of the ballpark in April.

Temple, who celebrated his 87th birthday Monday, coached at TSU from 1953-1994 and the U.S. women’s Olympic track team in 1960 and 1964.

A total of 23 of his Tigerbelles won Olympic medals (13 gold), including Wyomia Tyus and Edith McGuire, who finished first and second in the 100-meter dash at the Tokyo Games and attended Tuesday’s ceremony.

The idea to build a statue came from Nashville businessman Bo Roberts.

“They told me about two years ago that they wanted to do this, and I thought they were just talking; I didn’t pay no attention to what they were saying,” Temple said. “Then about a year ago they brought it up again, and I still thought they were just talking until we had lunch with the sculptor at Swett’s (Restaurant) later on in the year. Then they got to talking and I said, ‘I think they mean business.’”

Temple said he likes that the statue will be in an area where people will run and exercise.

Roberts said several locations were considered before he and a group of city leaders settled on the ballpark.

“We were looking around at different locations and wanted to get one that was appropriate and fresh and had exposure to a lot of people,” Roberts said.

“In communicating with (Nashville Sports Authority executive director) Toby Compton and the mayor we looked at it and thought this was the perfect place at this new, exciting ballpark. It will be in the entry plaza area on the greenway, which is open 365 days a year.”

The sculptor, Brian Hanlon, unveiled a model of the statue.

“The reason this sculptor is important is that we have to create historical markers of people that made a difference,“ Hanlon said. “This statue is not for Ed Temple, it’s about coach Ed Temple and Tennessee State. There’s a very important difference. And in that way there is humility in it. Then you can inspire and educate.”

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Alumna and State Representative Brenda Gilmore to Speak at TSU’s Annual Founders’ Day Commemoration

State Rep. Brenda Gilmore
State Rep. Brenda Gilmore

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – State Rep. Brenda Gilmore, a graduate and staunch supporter of Tennessee State University, will return to her alma mater on Thursday, Oct. 2 as the keynote speaker at the University’s 2014 Founders’ Day celebration.

The ceremony will be held in Kean Hall on the main campus at 9 a.m.

Gilmore, a Democrat and four-term member of the Tennessee General Assembly, represents Tennessee’s 54th District in Davidson County. A native of Sumner County, she was first elected to the General Assembly in 2006.

The former Metro Councilwoman served in many other areas before becoming a state lawmaker. For 20 years she was the director of University Mail Services at Vanderbilt University. She also worked as a mortgage loan counselor for Fidelity Federal Savings & Loan Association, and director of the Postal Services Division of the State of Tennessee.

In the General Assembly, Gilmore chairs the Davidson County Delegation and is a member of the House Committees on Agriculture and Natural Resources, and Criminal Justice, and a member of the Agriculture and Natural Resources Subcommittee. She is also a member of the Assembly’s Joint Fiscal Review Committee.

Previously, Gilmore served as the chair of the Environment Committee, secretary of the Conservation and Environment Committee, member of the Commerce and Insurance, and Utilities, and Conservation Committees. She also served as chair of the Parks Committee, and as a Member of the Small Business Committee.

A recipient of several awards, Gilmore is noted for taking strong stands for women and children causes. Recently, she served as chair of the Capital Campaign for the Northwest YMCA, and helped raise $5 million for an indoor swimming pool and center renovations.

She has held seats on many community boards including serving as chair of the Senior Citizens Inc. Board, trustee of the board for Skyline Medical Center, and a member of the Board of Trust for Belmont University.

Gilmore holds a B.S. degree in Business Administration from TSU, and a master’s degree in Human Resource Development from Vanderbilt University. She is married to Harry Gilmore. They have one daughter, Erica Gilmore, a Metro Councilwoman.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU takes Mobile Biodiesel Education Demonstration “on the road” to area high schools

Dr. de Koff, professor of Bioenergy Crop Production, and Project Director for the MBED demonstrates biodiesel production to students at Cheatham County High School on Sept. 19th.
Dr. de Koff, professor of Bioenergy Crop Production, and Project Director for the MBED demonstrates biodiesel production to students at Cheatham County High School on Sept. 19.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) —The College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences has taken its Mobile Biodiesel Education Demonstration (MBED) trailer on the road this fall, making stops at Cheatham County and Lebanon High Schools on Sept. 19 and Sept. 25, respectively. The MBED, which is a self-contained unit that allows for demonstration of the process that converts oils from feedstocks such as canola seed into usable biodiesel, will make another stop at Mt. Juliet High School on Friday, Oct. 3.

Dr. Jason de Koff, assistant professor of Bioenergy Crop Production, and Project Director for the MBED, noted the importance of the mobility of this project.

Research Assistant Richard Link discusses the biodiesel conversion process at Lebanon High School's "Ag Day" on Sept. 25th.
Research Assistant Richard Link discusses the biodiesel conversion process at Lebanon High School’s “Ag Day” on Sept. 25.

“By taking this demonstration on the road, we’ve been able to speak to hundreds of area high school students about the work that we’re doing at TSU in the area of biofuels,” de Koff said. “This demonstration in particular is an excellent example of the multiple facets and opportunities that exist with agriculture.”

In addition to exposing students to scientific processes that may not be typically associated with agriculture, the MBED also offers an opportunity to engage students in hands-on learning opportunities that can, according to Dr. de Koff, “bridge the gap between the textbook and the real world.”

The MBED is funded through a grant from the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture. For more information about this or other biofuels-related activities within the CAHNS, contact Dr. de Koff at 615.963.4929, jdekoff@tnstate.edu, or on Twitter @TSUBioenergy.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

“Education is the Key to Life,” Dr. Bobby Jones Tells TSU Students during Back To School with HistoryMakers

Dr. Bobby Jones, Gospel great, television host, and Tennessee State University alumnus, spoke to students about the importance of education during Back to School with the HistoryMakers Friday, Sept. 26. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)
Dr. Bobby Jones, gospel great, television host, and Tennessee State University alumnus, spoke to students about the importance of education during Back to School with the HistoryMakers Friday, Sept. 26. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – As part of the 5th Annual Back to School with the HistoryMakers, TSU alumnus and HistoryMaker inductee, Dr. Bobby Jones, spoke to education majors from the University about the importance of education and the opportunities it presents.

“Education is the practice of becoming,” he told the more than 100 students in Paog Auditorium September 26. “It (education) will provide the basis of all your future opportunities and a way to give back to others,” added Jones, who graduated from TSU at age 19 with a bachelor’s degree in education.

Jones was on campus as part of the 5th Annual Back to School with the HistoryMakers, a national program that puts black leaders in direct contact with young people across the nation. It encourages commitment to student achievement, as well as brings African American leaders into schools to motivate students, and raise awareness of the achievements of accomplished African Americans in their communities.

Jones, who went on to earn a master’s degree, also from TSU, and an Ed.D. degree from Vanderbilt University, and later a Th.D. degree from Payne’s Theological Seminary, said that “anything worth having is worth working for.”

“Think forward and never give up on a dream, but remember to do the work,” he said, adding, “Laziness will not get you anywhere.”

Jones was recently inducted into the HistoryMakers that recognizes individual “Makers” in a noted field, such as the arts, business, law, politics, style, science and sports. He was inducted as a “MusicMaker,” a category that consists of individuals who compose, perform, and promote music.

During the hour-long presentation, Jones explained to those gathered, that education, specifically the one he received at TSU, changed his life, and “opened doors I never thought were possible.”

All he knew once he graduated high school at age 15 in Henry, Tennessee, he explained, was picking cotton and plowing fields. With no college preparation, he headed to Nashville to start working on his four-year college degree.

“My education at TSU provided me options,” said Jones. “It set me on a course for a lifestyle and can do the same for you. Remember that when you’re educated, you learn a set of skills for a lifetime, and that is something no one can take away.”

He told the students about his career as a teacher in the in the St. Louis Public Schools and the Nashville Metropolitan School system, a textbook consultant for McGraw Hill Publishers, and as an instructor at Tennessee State University from 1974 to 1986.

As a teacher, Jones explained how he helped develop the idea for a Black Expo in Nashville. During that effort, he introduced the pilot for what became “Bobby Jones Gospel” to WSM-TV in Nashville. That program eventually made it to Black Entertainment Television, and became his “crown jewel” of accomplishments, having run for 34 years as the longest running program on cable television, and revolutionized the gospel music industry.

“It all started somewhere and it all started here at TSU,” said Jones. “I am a graduate of this University and at age 19 I discovered how to function in the world with the skills I received here. I am no different than you. You have the same opportunities.”

As a member of HistoryMakers, Jones joins the likes of poet Maya Angelou, actor Roscoe Lee Brown, baseball great Ernie Banks, and acclaimed vocalists Nancy Wilson, Mary Wilson, and Bebe Winans, among others.

The Back to School program began in 2010 with 200 HistoryMakers in 107 schools in 50 cities in 25 states. In 2011, the program more than doubled – bringing 458 HistoryMakers into 286 schools in 112 cities in 35 states. Participating HistoryMakers represent a diverse range of professional backgrounds, from artists, musicians, and business leaders to politicians, religious leaders, and scientists.

The HistoryMakers is committed to preserving and making widely accessible the untold personal stories of both well-known and unsung African Americans. The goal is to preserve the oral history of 5,000 African American history makers, and to establish an online database that will educate and show the breadth and depth of the accomplishments of individual African Americans across a variety of disciplines.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Rapper K Camp to Perform at Tennessee State University Student Homecoming Concert

kcampNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The rapper commonly known as K Camp will be the star performer at the Tennessee State University student Homecoming concert at the Gentry Center on Thursday, Sept. 25. He replaces singer August Alsina, who was reportedly injured after a fall while performing at the Irving Plaza in New York a week ago.

According to the Office of Student Activities, all other appearances, including performances by comedian Lil Duval, and rapper, songwriter and record producer Juicy J remain unchanged.

Camp, officially named Kristopher Camp, is best known for the singles “Money Baby” and “Cut Her Off.”

The Milwaukee-born, Atlanta-raised rapper started performing in high school as part of a group called HBC. The group split later, but K Camp took his music a little more seriously, and continued to perform and record on his own.

In 2009, Camp released the party anthem “All Night,” which gained some popularity in Atlanta. He continued to build his reputation through underground releases such as Fan4life, Show Money, and In Due Time, hosted by DJ Drama. “Money Baby” has peaked at #20 on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles chart, #34 on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart and at #20 on the Rap Songs chart, while “Cut Her Off” featuring 2 Chainz, has peaked on the Billboard Hot 100 at #60.

In April 2014, he released the EP In Due Time on Interscope Records.

The TSU concert starts 7 p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance, and $15 at the door for students with valid college ID.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Noted Presenters to Highlight Fall Research Forum at Tennessee State University

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Speakers from the National Science Foundation and the Tennessee Department of Transportation will be the featured presenters at this year’s Fall Research Forum at Tennessee State University. The forum will be on Thursday, Sept. 25, beginning at 10 a.m., in the Research and Sponsored Programs Building.

Dr. A. Ja
Dr. A. James Hicks

Under the theme, “Research: Celebrating Excellence,” Dr. A. James Hicks, senior program leader at the NSF, will present as the keynote speaker, to be followed by Tanisha J. Hall, director of Long Range Planning at the TDOT.

TSU President, Dr. Glenda Glover, will bring greetings on behalf of faculty, staff and students during a luncheon in the Floyd-Payne Campus Center.

According to Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, chief research officer and associate vice president for Research and Sponsored Programs, the one-day forum will also feature faculty exhibitions and research on such topics as Cyber Defense for Attacks on Cloud and Mobile Systems; High Performance Computing Techniques; Safety Effectiveness Evaluation of Median Cable Barriers in Tennessee; and TDOT: Innovative Strategies for Public Involvement.

Tanisha J. Hall
Tanisha J. Hall

Deans and directors of the various colleges and research centers are expected to make brief presentations, Crumpton-Young said.

The keynote speaker, Dr. Hicks, who is program director of the Louise Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation, holds a B.S. degree in biology from Tougaloo College, and a Ph.D. in Botany from the University of Illinois-Urbana. He received postdoctoral training, at the Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, Missouri.

Prior to becoming the LSAMP program director, Hicks served as chairperson and professor of Biology from 1977 to 1988, and later Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences from 1988 to 1997 at North Carolina A&T. As a scientist his research focus has been in the area of plant systematics. His work has been reported at various scientific seminars and in peer review journals.

Hicks has received numerous honors and awards for his achievements in science and for his efforts in promoting the advancements of underrepresented groups in science, engineering and mathematics. Most notably, in 1988 he received the White House Initiatives Faculty Award for Excellence in Science and Technology with a letter from President Ronald Regan.

Hall, whose division at the TDOT is charged with identifying transportation needs through research and analysis of travel and safety data, has more than 18 years experience in urban planning.

A member of the Tennessee American Planning Association, and the American Institute of Certified Planners, Hall holds dual degrees in Business Administration, and Transportation and Logistics. She also holds a graduate degree in Urban and Regional Planning.

For more information on the Fall Research Forum contact Nannette Carter Martin at (615) 963-5827, (615) 963-7631 or mailto:nmartin@tnstate.edu

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Back to School with the HistoryMakers features TSU Alumnus Dr. Bobby Jones Sept. 26

BobbyJones-1
Dr. Bobby Jones

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Gospel great, television host, and Tennessee State University alumnus, Dr. Bobby Jones, will be the featured speaker at the 5th Annual Back to School with the HistoryMakers program Friday, Sept 26 at the T.E. Poag Auditorium beginning at 9 a.m.

The HistoryMakers is a national program that recognizes individual “Makers” in a noted field, such as the arts, business, law, politics, style, science and sports. Jones was recently inducted into the program as a “MusicMaker,” a category that consists of individuals who compose, perform, and promote music ranging from country to classical and doo wop, and includes lyricists, music executives, pianists, orchestra conductors, and gospel, among others.

As part of the HistoryMakers commitment to education, the Back To School With The HistoryMakers program puts black leaders in direct contact with young people across the nation. It encourages commitment to student achievement, as well as brings African American leaders into schools to motivate students, and raise awareness of the achievements of accomplished African Americans in their communities.

Usually the Back to School programs are held at elementary or middle schools, however, Dr. Jones selected his alma mater for this year’s program to bring attention to the education program at the University.

“Dr. Jones continues to be a role model and trail blazer in the music industry,” said TSU President, Glenda Glover. “We are proud of all his accomplishments and delighted he chose the University to document this important milestone in his life.”

Jones graduated from TSU at age 19 with a bachelor’s degree in elementary education. He went on to receive his M.Ed. degree from Tennessee State, and his Ed.D. degree from Vanderbilt University. Jones also holds a Th.D. degree from Payne’s Theological Seminary.

Early in his career, Jones went on to teach elementary students in the St. Louis Public Schools from 1959 to 1965, and Nashville Metropolitan Schools from 1966 to 1968. He then became a textbook consultant for McGraw Hill Publishers and worked as an instructor at Tennessee State University from 1974 to 1986.

As a teacher, Jones helped develop the idea for a Black Expo in Nashville. During that effort, he introduced the pilot for what became “Bobby Jones Gospel” to WSM-TV in Nashville. The television station picked up the show and it ran in Nashville from 1976 to 1980. Jones also created, produced and hosted “Bobby Jones’ World,” a magazine-style show that ran from 1978 to 1984.

In 1980, Black Entertainment Television premiered “Bobby Jones Gospel,” the longest continuously running original series on cable television, where Jones served as host and executive producer. In 1980, he also received the Gabriel Award and an International Film Festival Award for writing and performing Make a Joyful Noise, a Black gospel opera which aired on PBS.

In 1984, he won a Grammy Award for the Best Soul Gospel Performance by a duo or group with Barbara Mandrell for “I’m so glad I’m standing here today.” Jones has also received a Dove Award, three Stellar Awards, three Trumpet Awards, and a Presidential Commendation from president George W. Bush.

Dr. Jones went on to produce the show, “Video Gospel,” which premiered on BET in 1986. He also produced and hosted a number of other gospel shows. Jones, who is an instructor at Nova Southeastern University, owns a production studio in Nashville.

As a member of HistoryMakers, Dr. Jones joins the likes of poet Maya Angelou, actor Roscoe Lee Brown, baseball great Ernie Banks, and acclaimed vocalists Nancy Wilson, Mary Wilson, and Bebe Winans, among others.

The Back to School program began in 2010 with 200 HistoryMakers in 107 schools in 50 cities in 25 states. In 2011 the program more than doubled – bringing 458 HistoryMakers into 286 schools in 112 cities in 35 states. Participating HistoryMakers represent a diverse range of professional backgrounds; from artists, musicians, and business leaders to politicians, religious leaders, and scientists.

The HistoryMakers is committed to preserving and making widely accessible the untold personal stories of both well-known and unsung African Americans. The goal is to preserve the oral history of 5,000 African American history makers, and to establish an online database that will educate and show the breadth and depth of the accomplishments of individual African Americans across a variety of disciplines.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University to Screen National Documentary on African-Americans and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Rights

375652_537889596246236_36807159_nNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) -The New Black, a documentary, which tells the story of how the African-American community is grappling with the gay rights issue in light of the recent same-sex marriage movement and the fight over civil rights, will be screened at Tennessee State University on Thursday, Oct. 16.

In collaboration with the Gay Straight Alliance, a TSU student group, and the Nashville Black Pride, the University has planned a number of weeklong activities to coincide with the screening as part of TSU’s first celebration of LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender) History Month in October.

According to Tiffany Cox, the director of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action, the screening and celebration are a result of TSU receiving part of a $4,000 grant from the Human Rights Campaign. TSU is one of four historically black colleges and universities that received the grant to use the award-winning documentary “as a tool to advance on-campus LGBT inclusion.”

“Because of our strong commitment to ensuring a campus climate of equality and inclusion, we saw the announcement requesting proposals for this grant and we applied for it,” said Cox “We were elated when we received notification in the summer that TSU had been selected.”

The New Black, directed by Yoruba Richen, explores how race, faith, justice and identity intersected in Maryland’s politically powerful African American community in 2012 as the state prepared to vote on marriage equality. It comes on the heels of recent reports showing that while many majority-white colleges and universities have embraced the call for LGBT inclusion, HBCUs have been notably slow to extend their historical mission of social justice to the success of their LGBT students.

rainbow fist-1“TSU is very pleased to screen this documentary, and to host discussions and activities that promote the equal treatment of all students on our campus,” Cox said, reminding the community about the University’s “strong policy” against harassment or discrimination of any kind.

Visibly pleased and upbeat that TSU is screening The New Black documentary and hosting programs to mark LGBT History Month is Iesha Milliner, president of TSU’s Gay Straight Alliance, who contributed in developing the proposal for the HRC grant.

“I am glad that for the first time TSU is showing such support for the Alliance in its 10 years on this campus,” said Milliner, a junior Art Education major from Nashville. “The campus screening of The New Black will bring the student body together and provide answers to many questions that are asked on a daily basis. My greatest hope is that this event will open the eyes of this community to the LGBTQ issues that exist on this campus.”

The New Black has screened in more than 85 cities around the country through ITVS’s Community Cinema public education and civic engagement initiative. The documentary has garnered numerous awards, including the Audience Award at Philadelphia QFest, AFI Docs and Frameline International LGBT Film Festival, where it also received an honorable mention as Outstanding Documentary Feature. At New York City’s Urbanworld Film Festival, it won the jury award for Best Documentary Feature.

Other HBCUs that received funding to screen the documentary are Alabama State University, Johnson C. Smith University and Spellman College.

The screening at TSU on October 16 is at 5:30 p.m., in the Floyd Payne Campus Center Forum. Other events marking LGBT History Month will begin October 13-17. They will include displays, nationally recognized motivational speakers, panel discussions, free HIV screenings and workshops. For registration and more information, go to: http://www.tnstate.edu/eeoaa/tsusafezone.aspx

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.