Category Archives: NEWS

Tennessee State University Professor Selected for Accreditation Council Appeals Committee

Dr. Carole de Casal
Dr. Carole de Casal

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The Council for the Accreditation for Educator Preparation (CAEP) has selected a professor from Tennessee State University to serve on one of the most prestigious slots for its accreditation committee.

Dr. Carole de Casal, professor of Educational Leadership and former chair of the Department of Educational Leadership, has been selected as a member of the Executive Appeals Committee. She was one of only 10 in the nation chosen to perform in this role for the new organization. The committee will be responsible for reconsideration and decision when a university does not pass their accreditation and chooses to appeal.

CAEP takes the place of the long-standing National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and advances educator preparation through evidence-based accreditation that assures quality, and supports continuous improvement to strengthen P-12 student learning.

de Casal has more than 25 years of experience with accreditation, and more than 20 years working as both a team leader and team member for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, the regional body for the accreditation of degree-granting higher education institutions in the southern states. She has also worked as a State Board of Examiner for the NCATE, and more than 10 years working as a state program approver for sponsored programs administrations.

She has also served a Research I Carnegie University as the director of Accreditation for three campuses and eight colleges, serving in this capacity when Hurricane Katrina destroyed one of the campuses under state and national review for its first accreditation in 10 years. Both campuses subsequently passed their accreditations. In fact, the review was videotaped and distributed as the model for a way in which an NCATE and state review should be conducted.

Additionally, de Casal has led four other institution departments and colleges through accreditations, three of which were recognized as national models for the way in which accreditation reviews should be conducted.

The appointment comes on the heels of another selection for de Casal. She was recently selected to become a member of International Women’s Leadership Association. Few women professionals are invited for membership, and those who qualify have to make significant national and international contributions to their chosen career arena, the national and international community, and the national and international family unit.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Richard Dent going into Black College Football HOF

Richard Dent - HS
Former Tennessee State All-American defensive end Richard Dent will be inducted into the Black College Football Hall of Fame in 2015. He was among seven players going into the Hall from a list of 25 finalists. (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Former Tennessee State All-American defensive end Richard Dent will be inducted into the Black College Football Hall of Fame in 2015.

Dent is among seven players going into the Hall from a list of 25 finalists. The announcement was made Wednesday.

Dent was a three-time All-American who recorded 39 sacks during his TSU career (1979-82) along with 158 tackles.

TSU retired Dent’s jersey No. 95 in 2013 after he became the first former Tigers player inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2011.

Dent was an eighth-round pick of the Chicago Bears in the 1983 NFL draft. In 1986 he was named most valuable player of Super Bowl XX.

In his 15 NFL seasons, which also included stints with the 49ers, Colts and Eagles, Dent recorded 137.5 sacks.

Joining Dent in the Black College Football Hall of Fame 2015 class is Roger Brown (Maryland Eastern Shore), L.C. Greenwood (Arkansas at Pine Bluff), Ernie “Big Cat” Ladd (Grambling State), Ken Riley (Florida A&M), Donnie Shell (South Carolina State) and Coach W.C. Gorden (Jackson State). The seven were selected by a 13-member committee of journalists, commentators, historians and former NFL executives.

Richard DentInductees will be honored at the Sixth annual Black College Football Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony at the College Football Hall of Fame in Atlanta on Feb. 28, 2015.

The Hall was established in 2009 to honor the best players and coaches from historically black colleges and universities. The additional seven inductees now brings the number  to 58. Among those already enshrined are Grambling’s Buck Buchanan, Mississippi Valley State’s David “Deacon” Jones, Bethune-Cookman’s Larry Little, Alcorn State’s Steve McNair, Jackson State’s Walter Payton, Mississippi Valley State’s Jerry Rice, Alabama A&M wide receiver John Stallworth, Texas Southern defensive end Michael Strahan and Grambling coach Eddie Robinson.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Office of Diversity and International Affairs at Tennessee State University Receives Grant to Strengthen Ties with Japan

University becomes one of the first HBCUs to receive funding through the Japan Foundation

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) –The Office of Diversity and International Affairs (DIA) at Tennessee State University has been awarded a $6,138 grant from the Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnerships to assist in strengthening its outreach and partnership with Japan. TSU is one of the first HBCUs to receive funding from the agency.

Motohiko Kato, Consulate General of Japan at Nashville
Motohiko Kato, Consul-General of Japan in Nashville

“We are very proud to be one of the first HBCUs to receive this grant and plan to engage in many more partnerships that allow our students the opportunity to experience education from a global perspective so that they are better prepared to meet the demands of our global world,” said Dr. Jewell Winn, DIA executive director. “TSU has always been committed to diversity and inclusion, and has opened our doors to all students desiring a quality education. We look forward to continuing to build partnerships that create strong academic and research opportunities for our students and faculty.”

The grant announcement comes at a great time for the University as it kicks off International Education Week November 10-15. The Japan Foundation has become more assertive in outreach to HBCUs. On Monday, Nov. 10, DIA will host the newly appointed Consul-General of Japan in Nashville, Motohiko Kato, at a luncheon. Discussions will focus on research, teaching, exchange and study-abroad opportunities for students and faculty members through the Japan Exchange and Teaching Program.

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“International Education Week is an opportunity to celebrate the benefits of education and exchange worldwide,” Winn said. “Tennessee State University is among the most diverse institutions in the Tennessee Board of Regents system and among HBCUs across the country, and these efforts allow us to showcase all the great things we have to offer not only to international students, but those here in the United States.”

Additionally, on Wednesday, Nov. 12, DIA will present the Ms. Collegiate International Pageant at 6 p.m. in Poag Auditorium. The pageant provides personal and professional opportunities for young women, and is the first such event offered on campus with the sole purpose of exposing the campus community to the beauty, opinions, talent and intelligence of young women from countries around the world. The pageant will have representations from Somalia, Saudi Arabia, India, the Dominican Republic, Iraq, Nigeria, Liberia, Jamaica, Laos and Panama. The winner will receive a book scholarship, along with other amenities and recognition as a campus leader representing international students. The event is free and open to the public.

On Thursday, Nov. 13, a Japanese cultural festival and exhibition will be held in Jane Elliott Hall on the main campus from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. Students from McGavock High School will participate in the festival as part of the University’s ongoing recruitment efforts. The week will conclude with joint activities with other area high schools and universities.

International Education Week began in 2000. It is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and the U.S. Department of Education. This annual observance is celebrated in November of each year across the United States and in more than 100 countries.

 

For more information on the Office of Diversity and International Affairs, call 615.963.4977.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Establishes Crime Prevention and Safety Advisory Group

TSU President, Dr. Glenda Glover (center) meets with members of the newly established Campus Safety Commission Monday, Nov. 3. The commission will work with University officials to identify, research, and recommend crime-prevention strategies, safety methods, and best practices to ensure the continued well-being of the university campus community. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
TSU President, Dr. Glenda Glover (center) meets with members of the newly established Campus Safety Commission Monday, Nov. 3. The commission will work with University officials to identify, research, and recommend crime-prevention strategies, safety methods, and best practices to ensure the continued well-being of the university campus community. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University has named the 15 members of its new Campus Safety Commission. University officials met Monday, Nov. 3 to define the group’s responsibilities, goals and mission.

President Glover officially introduced members of the Commission to the public in a news conference following the meeting. The 15-member group will work with University officials to identify, research, and recommend crime-prevention strategies, safety methods, and best practices to ensure the continued well-being of the university campus community.

President Glover appointed each member of the commission, which is a cross-section of law enforcement personnel, TSU students, administrators, and faculty, along with alumni and community partners. They will help analyze and identify areas for improvement, hold discussions with crime-prevention experts/other professionals to design/implement best practices, and brainstorm with TSU and community law enforcement partners.

Members of the commission are:

  • Anthony Carter, TSU Deputy Chief of University Police
  • Deborah Burris –Kitchen, Chair of the TSU Criminal Justice Department
  • Summer Croom, TSU Student Government Association representative at-large
  • Peggy Earnest, TSU Dean of Students
  • Commander Terrence Graves, Metropolitan Nashville Police, North Precinct
  • Reverend Jimmy D. Greer, Pastor of Friendship Baptist Church
  • Charles Hemphill, Supervisor of TSU Campus Union
  • Sharon Hurt, Executive Director, Jefferson Street United Merchants Partnership
  • Sandra Hunt, TSU National Alumni Association – Nashville Chapter president
  • Officer Thomas Jackson, TSU Police Department
  • Curtis Johnson, Associate Vice President of Administration and Executive Director of Emergency Management
  • Barbara Murell, Director of Community Relations
  • Tarence Rice, TSU student
  • Laurne Thomas, Executive Vice President, TSU Student Government Association
  • Grant Winrow, TSU coordinator of special projects

Planning for the Campus Safety Commission began last semester and is a part of the University’s overall safety and crime prevention initiative. The commission will meet several times throughout the year, keep records of progress and report back to President Glover.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Business Incubation Center Builds Entrepreneurs Through Start-ups and Small Business Development

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Clinton Gray III, Derrick Moore and Emmanuel Reed wanted to turn their three-man moving company into a thriving business, but they didn’t know how.

They turned to the Nashville Business Incubation Center at the TSU Center for Entrepreneurship and Economic Development, for help.

The three former college roommates, who dreamed up their moving business idea while still in school at TSU, only had a rented truck and the “grandiose” dream to build a successful moving company like no other.

In 2010, the NBIC stepped in, providing access to business expertise, networking opportunities, mentoring and consulting relationships, and office space for the business start-up.

Moore_Reed
The three former college roommates, who dreamed up their moving business idea while still in school at TSU, only had a rented truck and the “grandiose” dream to build a successful moving company like no other. Now, Clinton Gray III (not pictured) , Derrick Moore (left) and Emmanuel Reed have turned their three-man moving company into a thriving business with an expected revenue projection of $1.6 million by the end of the next business cycle. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

In three and a half years, since moving into the center, The Green Truck Moving Company has more than doubled sales each year, growing from three employees and a rented truck, to 30 employees and seven company-owned moving trucks. For a business that started with an initial $3,000 investment, the company’s revenue projection is $1.6 million by the end of the next business cycle, according to Gray, who, as director of marketing, is the front man for the company.

“We wouldn’t be halfway where we are today if it wasn’t for the incubation center,” said Gray. “We have outgrown two previous spaces and have had to move to another. From 500 square-feet when we first came here, we are now occupying a 2,000 square-foot area.”

The incubation center offers management and technical assistance to small businesses for up to five years through classes, programs, onsite mentoring, one-on-one business counseling and peer support.

Angela Crane-Jones, director of the Nashville Incubation Center
Angela Crane-Jones, director of the Nashville Incubation Center (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations) 

“Our goal is to increase an entrepreneur’s or startup’s likelihood of success by orchestrating connections to coaching, capital, customers, resources and talent,” said Director Angela Crane-Jones.

She said since its establishment in 1986, the NBIC has provided “a well-rounded entrepreneurship and incubation platform” for local businesses. NBIC embraces diversity with a focus on microenterprises: minority, veteran and women owned businesses.

“In the past five years NBIC’s clients have generated over $44.1 million in sales and created 253 new jobs,” Crane-Jones said.

Last year, NBIC clients reported a combined 21 percent increase in sales to close the year at nearly $17 million, while creating 64 new jobs for the Nashville area.

“When they come in, we assess their idea or business growth potential,” Crane-Jones said. “We help them to understand the core functions of human resources, accounting, marketing, legal and operations.”

This way, she said, they can be held accountable to be sure they are hiring the right people, reinvesting their profits into the company, have access or a path to obtain capital, and building sustainable business relationships.

These core values of accountability, reinvestment and sustainability have been a key reason why NBIC start-ups have been successful, and many beat the odds while others floundered under the weight of the recent economic downturn, said Crane-Jones.

U-Kno Catering, a professional catering service and cafeteria food service contractor that prides itself on offering fine cuisine and quality service at an affordable price, knows well the benefit of abiding by the NBIC’s core values.

During the recent recession, while other companies and businesses were struggling and reporting losses, U-Kno Catering, which joined the incubation center in 2008, was maintaining a comfortable profit margin, says owner Brenda Odom, a TSU graduate.

“With the help of the center, we made it a point to reinvest our profits, found a better way to market our business using QuickBooks to track sales, expenses and create invoices instantly,” added Odom, who has more than 20 years experience in the catering and food service industry.

She started the company seven years ago looking to fill a Middle Tennessee market in search of a dependable, fast and quality food service entity with its origin “right here.” There is every indication that Odom has hit her stride. From an initial 1,000 square feet, her business now occupies 2,000 square feet of space at the incubation center.

Among U-Kno Catering’s clients are such notables as Vanderbilt University, Deloitte, Allstate, and NES (Nashville Electric Service), which according to Odom, needed a substantial security bond to sign a contract with the catering service.

“We did not have the bonding, but the incubation center stepped in and provided a letter of guarantee to the bank to help us secure the contract, and bond in less than 30 days,” Odom said.

The success of the NBIC, according to its director, has been largely due to its vision as “the best place to grow a small business,” supported by the University leadership and a Board of Directors including individuals with proven business abilities and keen leadership skills.

Dr. Ruthie Reynolds, executive director of the Center for Entrepreneurship and Economic Development. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)
Dr. Ruthie Reynolds, executive director of the Center for Entrepreneurship and Economic Development. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Although TSU President Glenda Glover – a CPA herself and former dean of a business school – joined the University just two years ago, immediately upon arrival saw the need to make the center more responsive to the needs of the business community and the university. She established the Center for Entrepreneurship and Economic Development, with an executive director, to serve as an umbrella overseeing the functions of the incubation center, and the Small Business Development Center in the College of Business.

The goal of establishing the CEED was twofold, said Executive Director, Dr. Ruthie Reynolds, also a CPA and a longtime business professor.

“Being so aware of the business world, President Glover wanted a better coordination of the entrepreneurial efforts at the University, as well as begin an interdisciplinary approach to entrepreneurship,” said Reynolds.

She said CEED was created to expand the focus of educating and preparing students for positions within corporations to raising student awareness of self-employment as career alternative.

“By bringing the incubation center and the SBDC under one umbrella, the Center for Entrepreneurship and Economic Development endeavors to nurture and encourage entrepreneurial spirit in the students, faculty and staff and the local community,” added Reynolds.

According to Crane-Jones, this coordination of effort has worked well for the incubation center. Although admission to the center is opened to all, she said 27 percent of the new entrepreneurs and startups are either current or former TSU students.

Graduates of the center are making their marks in business and industry.

Take for instance Zycron, started at the center about 23 years ago, is now an industry leader in information technology services, providing client-specific solutions in health care, energy and utilities. It has five offices across the U.S., Latin America and England serving a broad client base.

But while this sounds good, Gray, of The Green Truck Moving Company, says it takes a lot of work to make it all happen.

“Starting a business is not easy, which is why access to business experts and affordable office space that the incubator program offers is so vital,” he noted. “It takes a lot of energy, a lot of will power and a little bit of luck thrown in to succeed.”

And Gray, Moore and Reed know too well what hard work and perseverance can do. Just as they dreamt, they built a moving company like no other…. a real “green company.” Their company trucks run on biodiesel, a cleaner form of fuel, and for every move, the company plants two trees, “which helps beautify our communities as well as clean up our earth’s atmosphere.”

Now, that’s like no other!

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Police arrest suspect in shooting of TSU student

De'mario Fisher
De’mario Fisher

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Nashville Metropolitan Police have caught the final Woodland Hills escapee, who was charged in connection with Wednesday night’s shooting of an 18-year-old TSU student.

De’mario Fisher has been charged with especially aggravated robbery, aggravated assault and unlawful gun possession in the attack of an 18-year old TSU student Wednesday night.

Fisher, 18, has been a fugitive since he and more than 30 other teens escaped from Woodland Hills on Sept. 1. Police said he was armed with a loaded gun when he was apprehended.

Tennessee State University president, Glenda Glover, praised the collaborative efforts of the Metro and TSU police forces, and said the campus community can breath easier now that the suspect is in custody.

“Both police forces have made it a top priority to capture the suspect involved in this crime,” said Dr. Glover. “We are grateful for their efforts for restoring a sense of relief back to not only the campus community, but to the larger community as well.”

The arrest comes on the heels of an earlier press conference today at Corinthian Missionary Baptist Church where local clergy, politicians, as well as Dr. Glover and members of the administration and students gathered as a sign of unity against crime in the community and against students at local universities and colleges. During the conference, Metro Police chief Steve Anderson identified Fisher as the primary suspect.

On Wednesday night, the gunshot victim and an 18-year-old friend were returning from the Wendy’s restaurant on 28th Avenue North. As they approached the intersection of John A. Merritt Boulevard and 31st Avenue North, the women noticed a dark colored four-door sedan parked on the street.

Moments later, a man with a pistol visible in his waistband got out of the passenger side, approached the victim and demanded her backpack. The victim refused and fought the gunman’s efforts to rob her. Ultimately the gunman put her in a headlock, threw her to the ground and shot her multiple times. Her friend received a minor injury. The gunman then fled back to the car, which was last seen traveling on John A. Merritt Boulevard.

Both students have been released from the hospital and are expected to make a full recovery.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Metro Police Identify Suspect in TSU Attempted Robbery, Shooting

Woodland Hills Escapee De’Mario Fisher Wanted in the Shooting of a TSU Student Wednesday Night

 

Metro Police Chief Steve Anderson announces the identification of De'Mario Fisher as the prime suspect in the attempted robbery and shooting of an 18-year old TSU student Friday, as president Glenda Glover and community leaders look on. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
Metro Police Chief Steve Anderson announces the identification of De’Mario Fisher as the prime suspect in the attempted robbery and shooting of an 18-year old TSU student Friday, as president Glenda Glover and community leaders look on. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Metropolitan Nashville Police Chief Steve Anderson today announced they have identified a suspect in Wednesday’s attempted robbery and shooting of an 18-year old female TSU student.

De’Mario Fisher is wanted for aggravated robbery, aggravated assault and unlawful gun possession in connection with Wednesday’s attack.

Fisher, who turned 18 today, has been a fugitive since he and more than 30 other teens escaped from Woodland Hills on September 1.  He is the only one who remains at-large.
 Fisher is considered to be armed and dangerous.

The announcement came during a press conference at Corinthian Missionary Baptist Church when local clergy, politicians, along with Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover and administration members joined together in a show of unity against crime in the community, and against students at area colleges and universities.

“I want to express my gratitude to the Metro and TSU police in identifying a dangerous suspect in this attack,” said Dr. Glover. “We are very appreciative of their efforts.”

On Wednesday night, the gunshot victim and an 18-year-old friend were returning from the Wendy’s restaurant on 28th Avenue North.  As they approached the intersection of John A. Merritt Boulevard and 31st Avenue North, the women noticed a dark colored four-door sedan parked on the street.

Moments later, a man with a pistol visible in his waistband got out of the passenger side, approached the victim and demanded her backpack.  The victim refused and fought the gunman’s efforts to rob her.  Ultimately the gunman put her in a headlock, threw her to the ground and shot her multiple times.  Her friend received a minor injury.  The gunman then fled back to the car, which was last seen traveling on John A. Merritt Boulevard.

Both students have been released from the hospital and are expected to make a full recovery.

Careful analysis of certain evidence recovered from the shooting scene by an MNPD expert led to the development of Fisher as a possible suspect.  The victim picked Fisher as her assailant from a photo lineup earlier today.

Anyone seeing Fisher or knowing his whereabouts is urged to contact the Emergency Communications Center at 615.862.8600 or Crime Stoppers at 615.74CRIME.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Aristocrat of Bands Selected for 13th Annual Honda Battle of the Bands Invitational

AOB1NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Congratulations to the Aristocrat of Bands!

The Tennessee State University nationally and internationally recognized marching band is on its way to yet another Honda Battle of the Bands Invitational Showcase.

The band was one of eight selected from among the nation’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities after a fierce online voting process. In addition to voting, students, alumni and fans of each HBCU took to social media to help their favorite marching bands advance to the 13th annual Battle of the Band showcase in Atlanta.

Feedback from band directors, HBCU school presidents and representatives from American Honda were also considered in the selection process.

An overall winner will be selected when the final eight bands take the Georgia Dome by storm on Jan. 24, 2015, to showcase their “incredible” musical talent and “electrifying” showmanship in front of a packed crowd.

The other bands making the final eight along with the Aristocrat of Bands are the Mighty Marching Hornets of Alabama State University, the Marching Wildcats of Bethune-Cookman University, Howard University’s Showtime Marching Band, making their first Honda Battle of the Bands appearance, and the Sonic Boom of the South from Jackson State University.

Also selected are North Carolina A&T University’s Blue and Gold Marching Machine, the Human Jukebox from Southern University, and the Marching Tornado of Talladega College.

This will be the sixth appearance for the Aristocrat of Bands at the Honda Battle of the Bands, having performed in 2003, 2004, 2011, and 2012 and 2014.

“It is gratifying that this will be the fourth time in five years for us to be chosen under my leadership,” said Dr. Reginald McDonald, acting band director. “Although we were selected by people voting online based on what they have seen and heard from our halftime shows, we look and sound great.”

According to a Honda release, this year’s theme, “March On,” is intended to serves as a reminder to students and fans that life on and off the field is a journey, and no matter the challenge, the dream or what may lie ahead, “learning never stops as long as you commit to ‘March On.’”

“Honda congratulates the eight bands selected to participate in the Invitational Showcase and thanks all of the schools, students, alumni and fans that participated in the process leading to Atlanta,” said Stephan Morikawa, assistant vice president, Corporate Community Relations, American Honda Motor Co., Inc. “Honda is committed to supporting education at HBCUs by investing in their programs and providing a platform aimed at helping students realize what Honda calls The Power of Dreams.”

The 2015 Invitational Showcase will feature the first-ever Honda Battle of the Bands Power of Dreams Award. Participating teams and fans will have the opportunity to nominate an outstanding member of their community who is working to help students achieve their dreams. Honda will then select a winner who will be recognized in Atlanta at the 2015 Honda Battle of the Bands Invitational Showcase.

Tickets to the Honda Battle of the Bands are available for purchase now on the official website, starting at just $10. The participating eight HBCUs will receive a $20,000 grant from Honda to support their music education programs, plus travel to and accommodations in Atlanta for the Invitational Showcase.

In another development, the Aristocrat of Bands has, for the second time, been invited to perform at the Bands of America Grand National Championship in Indianapolis in November.

According to McDonald, TSU will be the only HBCU to play twice in the Bands of America Grand Nationals, considered the nation’s premier marching band event.

“It is unique that these top high schools at the competition will get to see our band perform. We see this opportunity as a recruitment tool for both the band and the University,” added McDonald, who put the graduation rate among band members at more than 75 percent.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Colombian Orchestra Brings Sounds of the Caribbean Coast to Tennessee State University Oct. 30

Bolivar Symphony Orchestra-4NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University presents an evening with the Bolívar Symphony Orchestra from Colombia, Thursday, Oct. 30. The concert begins at 7 p.m. in the Poag Auditorium, and is free and open to the public.

The event is part of a four-state U.S. tour for the South American orchestra from the Bolívar Fine Arts and Sciences University in Colombia, that began in Miami and concludes in Nashville. Prior to arriving in Nashville, the orchestra performed in New Orleans, Orlando, Florida, as well as Hattiesburg and Meridian, Mississippi.

The orchestra will entertain audiences with songs from their repertoire including Adolfo Mejía, Strauss, and popular music of the Colombian Caribbean, filling each of the scenarios in its entirety.

Maestro Germán Céspedes leads the Colombian musicians, with the support of Sacra Náder, rector for the institution, who has lead and promoted this “Caribbean Autumn” concert as a way to bring the music, identity and multiculturalism in Colombia and the Caribbean coast to other countries of the continent.

“It is the first time that 45 symphonic musicians from the Department of Bolívar have departed (Colombia) as ambassadors of culture,” said Náder. “We are very proud of our symphonic orchestra and the talent and professionalism of its director and the musicians.”

This is not the first time musicians from Colombia have visited Tennessee State University. In June, nearly 20 music students took part in the exchange program, “Music without Borders,” to promote the University and its academic programs.

“Our partnership with Colombia is important because it provides an excellent opportunity for their students as well as TSU students to better understand each group’s culture, share academic interests and engage in dialogue to expand the scope of higher education,” said Dr. Jewell Winn, TSU’s chief diversity officer and executive director for international programs.

Prior to the concert, University officials will sign a Memorandum of Understanding formalizing a relationship between the two institutions to facilitate exchanges and dual degree possibilities.

“We are extremely happy for this opportunity because it solidifies our relationship,” added Winn. “It is also important because it shows the support and interest senior leadership from both institutions have in the success of the program.”

Paog Auditorium is located in the Davis Humanities Building. For more information, call 614.963.5341.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

U.S. Army Field Band Visits Tennessee State University October 29/30

Cantare and Soldiers’ Chorus ensembles to perform free concerts

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The U.S. Army Field Band’s Cantare and Soldiers’ Chorus will visit Tennessee State University October 29-30 to perform two concerts. Both concerts are free and open to the public.

2_Cantare2013
The small ensemble Cantare will perform Wednesday, Oct. 29 beginning at 11:30 a.m., in the E.T. Goins Recital Hall in the Performing Arts Center.

The small ensemble Cantare will perform Wednesday, Oct. 29 beginning at 11:30 a.m., in the E.T. Goins Recital Hall in the Performing Arts Center.

Cantare, comprised of classically trained soldier-musicians from the Soldiers’ Chorus, performs opera and songs for various settings, including educational outreach, recitals, and chamber music shows. These versatile musicians, and highly regarded performers in their field, strive to bring “fresh” characterizations and a dramatic flair to their spirited performances.

The Soldiers’ Chorus will perform Thursday, Oct. 30 in the Recital Hall of the Performing Arts Center beginning at 3 p.m.

The Soldiers’ Chorus will perform Thursday, Oct. 30 in the Recital Hall of the Performing Arts Center beginning at 3 p.m.
The Soldiers’ Chorus will perform Thursday, Oct. 30 in the Recital Hall of the Performing Arts Center beginning at 3 p.m.

The group includes Staff Sgt. Charles Parris, who earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Tennessee State University in music. He has performed as a member of the cathedral choirs of the Christ Church Cathedral in Nashville, the Washington National Cathedral, and the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception. Parris has also appeared as Soloist with the Nashville, Columbus, Ohio, and Jacksonville, Florida symphonies.

The Soldiers’ Chorus, founded in 1957, is the vocal complement of the United States Army Field Band of Washington, D.C. The 29-member mixed choral ensemble travels throughout the nation and abroad, performing as a separate component and in joint concerts with the Concert Band of the “Musical Ambassadors of the Army.” The chorus has performed in all 50 states, Canada, Mexico, Asia and throughout Europe.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.