Category Archives: NEWS

TSU Project on Best Practices in Nursery Production System Selected for Federal Funding

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A Tennessee State University project to promote best management practices in the nursery production system for the Mid-South region is one of 45 across the nation selected by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to share $26.6 million for innovative conservation initiatives.

TSU will receive nearly $793,000 through its College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences to enhance the current Southern Nursery Industry “Guide for Best Management Practices.”

As part of the project, TSU will also recommend modifications to the USDA NRCS Conservation Practice Standards that specifically address natural resource and water-quality concerns relating to the nursery industry in Tennessee, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and Georgia.

The three-year funding, received through a highly competitive grant process, is the first awarded by the USDA through its Conservation Innovation Grant program to an 1890 Land-Grant university. As a matching-funds grant, the total amount for the project is about $1.5 million.

dharma-pitchay_pp
Dr. Dharma Pitchay

Dr. Dharma Pitchay, assistant professor of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, is the principal investigator of the project. The co-principal investors are Drs. Bharat Pokharel, Sudipta Rakshit, Prabode Illukpitiya, Anthony Witcher and Chandra Reddy.

“This is a very prestigious grant to win as historically NRCS has not awarded CIG grants to 1890 universities,” said Reddy, who is dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences.

He said TSU will partner with a number of institutions in the region to implement the project, as well as set up a training laboratory on campus to train NRCS or Natural Resources Conservation Services educators in the new technologies.

“Awarding this prestigious grant is an acknowledgment that Tennessee State University has immediately useful agricultural technologies to promote with stakeholder communities in the state and across the region. I congratulate Dr. Pitchay, the co-PIs and institutional partners in winning this grant for us,” Reddy added.

Pitchay said the anticipated outcome of the project would include a trained cadre of growers, extension workers, and field technicians, as well as modification to existing and development of new BMPs and conservation practices.

“We also expect to send messages to nursery growers on the benefits of protecting natural resources and demonstration sites for future conservation field days and training programs,” Pitchay said.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Southern Heritage Classic Week Brings Victory, Builds Relationships for TSU

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – For Tennessee State University, the 27th Southern Heritage Classic was all that – classic.

The TSU Tigers trounced the Jackson State University Tigers 40-26 before more than 46,000 at the Liberty Bowl in Memphis, Tennessee, to culminate a weeklong series of activities and celebration.

The TSU victory was their fifth straight over the JSU Tigers, and improves TSU to 16-11 in the Southern Heritage Classic.

But the weeklong celebration was more than about football.

The TSU administration, staff, students and alumni engaged in a number of academic and relationship building activities that impact student learning, recruitment and support.

img_0627-1
President Glover speaks to reporters in the Liberty Bowl minutes before signing a partnership agreement with national syndicate radio host Tom Joyner that would increase the number of STEM teachers in Memphis and Shelby County, and Metro Nashville. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations).

A day before the football game, TSU and national syndicated radio host Tom Joyner announced a partnership that could give Tennessee’s two largest school districts a major boost in STEM teachers.

The initiative encourages community college graduates to attend TSU and teach in Memphis and Nashville after graduation.

“Today’s agreement with the Tom Joyner Foundation will help deserving students from five of our community colleges fulfill their desires to attend Tennessee State without the distractions of worrying about how to pay for tuition and fees,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. “Most importantly, we’re providing Memphis and Shelby County, along with the Metropolitan Nashville school system, with much needed STEM teachers for the students.”

Following the signing ceremony, President Glover and some senior members of the administration stopped over at Hanley Elementary School, where the president received a rousing welcome by the more than 600 cheering students in the school’s gymnasium.

14202745_1401245453225270_8499543168792494231_n-2
President Glover gives a pep talk to more than 600 elementary students during a stopover at Hanley Elementary School in Memphis. To Dr. Glover’s left is Dr. Sha Fanion, Aspire Hanley 2 Elementary principal and TSU graduate. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman)

“Do you want to go to college?” “What do you want to be when you grow up?” “Have you heard about Tennessee State University?” “Do you know what a university president does?”

These were questions Glover posed to the excited students, with a general mix of overwhelming “yes” and some “no” responses to each question.

“Our expectation for Dr. Glover’s visit is for scholars to know college is for certain no matter where they come from,” said Dr. Sha Fanion, principal of Aspire Hanley 2 Elementary and a 2003 graduate of TSU with a bachelor’s degree in special education. “Prior to Dr. Glover coming, we talked about her and the role of a university president. They were excited to know that she is a native of Memphis.”

Earlier during the week at the Memphis/Shelby County Presidential Reception, a recruitment ceremony for aspiring students and their parents, officials gave out scholarship information and other admission requirements.

Another key activity of the Southern Heritage Classic week is the Alumni Mixer hosted by the Office of Institutional Advancement, to thank alumni and supporters of TSU for their contribution. More than 200 filled the reception hall of Case Management, Inc., to meet former school mates and friends, as well as dine and receive updates from officials about activities and development at their alma mater.

“We just want to say thank you for all that you do for Tennessee State University to help keep needy students in school,” Glover said. “Your continued financial, material and other support and gifts are making a big difference in our students’ lives. We are thankful beyond measure for your support.”

At the VIP Mayor’s Reception, another mainstay of the classic week, officials of Baptist Memorial Health Care presented President Glover with a check for $5,000. The fund is to support a scholarship for a deserving student from Shelby County, who is in the allied health program at TSU.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University and Tom Joyner Foundation partner to increase math, biology, chemistry teachers in State

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The State’s two largest school districts could see an increase in math, biology and chemistry teachers thanks to a partnership between Tennessee State University and national syndicated radio host Tom Joyner.

The initiative, which encourages community college graduates to attend TSU and teach in Memphis and Nashville after graduation, was announced at a news conference in Memphis on Friday, Sept. 9, a day before the Southern Heritage Classic game between TSU and Jackson State University.

The partnership seeks to get more students interested in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM. It will offer full scholarships to students graduating from five Tennessee community colleges: Southwest Tennessee, Nashville State, Volunteer State, Motlow State, and Columbia State.

“Today’s agreement with the Tom Joyner Foundation will help deserving students from five of our community colleges fulfill their desires to attend Tennessee State without the distractions of worrying about how to pay for tuition and fees,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. “Most importantly, we’re providing Memphis and Shelby County, along with the Metropolitan Nashville school system, with much needed STEM teachers for the students.”

Tom Joyner said he’s glad the initiative will not only help to produce more STEM teachers, but also ease students’ financial burdens.

“We always say that it’s one thing to go to school, but it’s another thing to stay in school,” said Joyner, whose mother was raised at then Tennessee A&I State College by his great aunt, Jane Elliott Hall. A building was named in her honor.

The Tom Joyner Foundation will provide 75 percent of the scholarship funds, and the rest will come from the NSF funded Tiger Teach Initiative and TSU’s Office of Community College Initiatives.

Sharon Peters, executive director of TSU’s Community College Initiatives, said the scholarship program is very much needed.

“We don’t have enough young people filling STEM careers,” Peters said. “A full scholarship to teach in math and biology or chemistry should lead to more teachers, particularly in Nashville and Memphis where we need them.”

School officials acknowledged the need for STEM teachers and lauded the partnership.

“As a system, we always have a shortage of science and math teachers,” said Roderick Richmond, director of student support services for Shelby County Schools. “So I’m really excited about the partnership with Tennessee State and the Tom Joyner Foundation.”

Students beginning their first semester of community college in fall 2016 will be eligible for the scholarship program. They must graduate from the two-year institution with a 3.0 grade point average, and maintain a 3.0 GPA while at TSU, according to requirements. Graduates must teach within the Nashville or Memphis area.

“This partnership gives our students an opportunity to fulfill their dreams,” said Tracy Hall, president of Southwest Tennessee Community College.

Tom Joyner, Jr., who oversees the foundation, agreed.

“This ensures that more students are able to graduate,” he said. “It ensures more children will be placed where they’re needed, the STEM classrooms of Tennessee, as well as throughout America.”

The Tom Joyner Foundation supports historically black colleges and universities with scholarships, endowments, and capacity building enhancements. Since it was created in 1997, the foundation has raised more than $65 million to help students stay in school.

Last year, the foundation selected TSU to be a “school of the month.” Under the designation, the foundation awarded scholarships to students throughout the month and featured TSU’s accomplishments on Tom Joyner’s weekly morning program.

To learn more about the Tom Joyner Foundation, visit: http://tomjoynerfoundation.org.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU graduate ready for Paralympic Games

 

Courtesy: WSMV News

Click for full original story

NASHVILLE, TN (WSMV) – Athletes who have defied tremendous odds will take center stage in Rio de Janeiro at the opening of the Paralympic Games.

The Games got underway Wednesday, Sept. 8.

Dozens of Nashville residents will have a reason to cheer as Tennessee State University’s own Markeith Price prepares to compete.

th
Markeith Price

Price got his first shot at the games in London, but did not place. He is hoping this time will be different.

“I know I’m going to be excited. I know I’m going to be nervous. But I’ll just have a smile on my face the whole time and just enjoy myself,” Price said. “And when it’s go time and ready to compete, it’s go time.”

Like most runners, Price spends early mornings practicing starts, lifting weights, and improving his times at the 100 and 400 meter events.

But unlike most athletes, Price cannot see much of the track.

“At the age of 3, I got diagnosed with something called optic atrophy, which is damage to the optic nerves,” he said.

The nerves that connect the eyes to the brain are damaged for Price. He can barely see five feet in front of him.

“Honestly, I can only see but so far,” Price said. “Like we’re talking now, I’m looking straight in the camera, but I really can’t see the picture.”

But Price never let sight hold him back. As a child, he said when he couldn’t see the lines on the track, he learned to feel them.

“One thing I like to say is, yes, I’m limited by sight, but I am not limited by my faith,” he said.

He took that tenacity with him to TSU, where he joined the track team and trained under Coach Chandra Cheeseborough.

“We treated Markeith as a regular athlete,” Cheeseborough said. “He would be on relays, expected to jump, run, whatever event we put him in. It was not limitation. We did not succumb to his disability.”

Price credits TSU for making him the athlete he is today as he sports USA Paralympic gear.

“I’ve got the Team USA with the Nike on the chest,” Price said, smiling.

Price said he can’t wait to compete for a medal and make his family and Nashville proud.

“To all my family and friends, to all my coaches, Coach Cheeseborough, to TSU family, I want to say thank you for supporting me. I appreciate you guys for all that you’ve done,” he said.

The Paralympic Games Opening Ceremony begins at 6 p.m. on NBCSports. They are also available to watch online.

Price will be running in the 100 and 400 meter races on Thursday.

Copyright 2016 WSMV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Marine Corps Leadership Seminar Teaches TSU Business Students Critical Skills for the Real World

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University business majors are taking notes from the U.S. military.

On Sept. 7, more than 40 students from the College of Business participated in a daylong leadership seminar conducted by a group of Marines.

The workshop was part of Marine Week, an annual event in which the Corps take over a major city to show the public the capabilities of the U.S. Marine. It includes displays of some of the military’s big guns and hard wares, as well as appearances at schools and veteran hospitals.

At the downtown Avon Williams Campus, students participated in the Marine Corps Leadership Seminar, which exposes business students to Marine Corps leadership principles that ensure success in the business world.

It emphasizes courage, tenacity and teamwork they say are needed to “help you stand out from the competition.”

th-1
Lt. Gen. Ronald L. Bailey

“We really think that the same leadership traits and principles that are used in the Marine Corps, whether on the battlefield or whether at bases or stations, are the same type of leadership that is required and expected of business leaders,” Marine Lt. Gen. Ronald L. Bailey said.

A 39-year veteran of the U.S. military, Bailey is the Marine deputy commandant for Plans, Policies and Operations.

He said the seminar also provides an opportunity to expose Tennessee State University students to young Marines as they talk about their experiences in the Corps.

“The leadership traits and principles that they have lived through in the Marine Corps are the same ones that the students can gain from, such as integrity and initiative, to be successful in the business world,” Bailey said.

img_8239-1
Darien Munroe

Derrien Munroe is a senior business administration major with concentration in marketing. His future goal is to own a marketing firm. He said the seminar was very timely and taught him skills that could be critical in his future.

“What I take away from this seminar is how to be a better leader using ethics and morals to problem solve and develop better decision-making to better cope in life,” Munroe said. “I learned snippets and tools to correlate in the business world.”

The Dean of the College of Business, Dr. Millicent Lownes-Jackson, said the Marine Corps Leadership Seminar was in line with the goal of the college to equip business students with a “strong portfolio of valuable leadership skills” that attract potential employers.

“That is why this leadership seminar was so vastly important, as it afforded our students the opportunity to learn the Marine’s world-renowned principles that form the traits and values that define character as a leader,” Lownes-Jackson said.

This marks the first year of the College’s involvement with Marine Week Nashville. 

For more information about U.S. Marine Week events, visit www.usmarineweek.comDepartment of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Professor Receives State, National Recognitions for Works in Extension and Outreach

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A Tennessee State University professor, known for his work with farmers and Extension agents throughout Tennessee, has received multiple awards from the Tennessee Association of Agricultural Agents and Specialists, and the National Association of County Agricultural Agents.

Official photo
Dr. Jason de Koff

Jason de Koff, associate professor in the Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, received the Early Career Award, Achievement Award, and Communication Award from TAAA&S. The awards were presented in May at the organization’s annual meeting in Sevierville, Tennessee.

In July, de Koff, now in his sixth year at TSU, was given the NACAA Achievement Award and the Search for Excellence in Crop Production Award at the group’s annual meeting in Little Rock, Arkansas.

“I am quite honored by these awards,” de Koff said. “I plan to continue to represent TSU and Tennessee by providing my research and experiences to those who need them.”

The Early Career Award is the second for de Koff. In 2015, he won the prestigious American Society of Agronomy Early Career Professional Award for his contribution to the field of agronomy in education and research.

A professor of agronomy and soil science, de Koff’s primary area of research is on bioenergy crop production, with specific emphasis on crops like switchgrass and winter canola.

His extension program provides educational training opportunities to Extension agents as well as demonstration workshops on biodiesel production to youth and farmers.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

For the Third Year Straight a TSU Student Has been Selected White House HBCU All-Star

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Jeneisha Harris is a national all-star.

The TSU junior double major was among 73 students from across the nation who were named 2016 HBCU All-Stars by the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities on August 19.

This is the third consecutive year that a TSU student has been selected for this prestigious honor.

The HBCU All-Stars comprise undergraduate, graduate and professional students who are being recognized for their accomplishments in academics, leadership, and civic engagement.

A White House release said over the next year, Harris and her fellow all-stars will serve as ambassadors of the White House Initiative, providing outreach and communication with fellow students about the value of education and networking resources.

Through social media and relationships with community-based organizations, the students will also share “proven practices” that support opportunities for young people to achieve their education and career potential.

“This honor means a lot to me,” said Harris, a combined biology and psychology major with a 3.4 GPA from Memphis, Tennessee. “Being an HBCU All-Star also honors my university, which I intend to use to engage in and promote educational programs to benefit young people in the community especially in my hometown.”

In announcing the 2016 cohorts, Kim Hunter Reed, the acting executive director of the White House Initiative on HBCUs, said the initiative is looking forward to working with the new class of HBCU All-Stars to promote opportunities for all young people.

“Our goal is to provide a unique opportunity for these talented students that exposes them to critical national conversations and thought leaders,” Reed said. “No doubt they will make their mark and represent their campuses well.”

Previous TSU HBCU All-Stars include Lauren Wigging, in 2015; and Jeremiah T. Cooper, in 2014.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

First-semester freshmen get new ties, good advice

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is making sure its students are prepared for success – or better yet, “tied” to it.

IMG_0778
TSU First-semester freshmen receive guidance on tie tying. (photo by Lucas Johnson, TSU Media Relations)

On August 23, first-semester male freshmen packed the Forum in TSU’s Campus Center for the second annual “Tied to Success” program. All of the young men were given reflex blue colored ties with the name of the university in white letters at the base of the tie.

And for those individuals who needed assistance tying just the right knot, university officials and community leaders were on hand to provide assistance.

“Many of them will be going into professional arenas, and some have never even worn a tie,” said Frank Stevenson, TSU’s dean of students. “And so this is kind of our right of passage into that professional world; we’re preparing them now.”

State Rep. Harold Love, Jr., an alumnus of TSU, agreed. In addition to the ties, he applauded the program for helping the new students assimilate into the collegiate culture. Following the tie tying and male bonding, TSU officials talked to the freshmen about how they should behave on campus, and in general.

“I’ve always appreciated my alma mater because it took young men and made them better,” said Love, who attended the program. “When we talk about African-American males going into their freshman year, it’s important for them to understand that wearing of the tie is essential because they will need one for job interviews. And they may end up with a job one day like mine, where they’ll be wearing one almost everyday.”

Orlandis Timmons of Huntsville, Alabama, said he appreciated the orientation, and that the tie provides a “better look for TSU.”

“It’s great representation at the school, and for us as individuals, as young men,” said Timmons, who plans to major in psychology.

More than 1,200 first-time freshmen are enrolled at TSU this fall.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

First-time Freshmen Take up Residence at Tennessee State University

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) -Tennessee State University has some new tenants: the Class of 2020.

On Wednesday, August 17, more than 1,200 first-time freshmen received keys to their residence halls, along with identification cards and passes to dining facilities, mail boxes, and classrooms. Upperclassmen began moving in the next day.

Hundreds of parents and other family members accompanied their children as volunteers – including staff, alumni and fellow students – helped the newcomers settle in their residence halls.

IMG_7822 (2)
Morganne Norwood, of Woodbridge, Virginia, was among nearly 1,200 first-time freshmen who moved in for the 2016 fall semester at TSU. She was accompanied by her parents, from left, step father Patrick Thomas, Windy Norwood, mother; Morganne; Don Norwood, father; and Debra Norwood, step mother. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The ease of transition caught the attention of Don Norwood, of Woodbridge, Virginia. He made the trek over night to drop off his daughter Morganne, who will be majoring in political science.

“It was like clockwork,” he said about the welcome they received at Wilson Hall, where Morganne will stay. “Folks were in line to help us unload and pack stuff, while others waited with refreshments and gifts. My daughter is going to love it here.”

Kim Grant of Milwaukee shared that sentiment. She said she believes her daughter, Aaliyah, is also going to enjoy college life at TSU.

“She looked at a couple (of colleges), but once she got the acceptance letter from TSU, all that went out the window,” Grant said. “She didn’t care about anything else. So I said, ‘if that’s what you really want, that’s what I’m going to make happen.'”

Aaliyah Grant said attending an HBCU provides a unique experience, and she’s looking forward to that more than anything. She said she also can’t wait to see TSU’s band.

“I don’t know how to play anything, but I know how to listen,” she said.

IMG_7826 (1)
Jordan Gossett, of Memphis, Tennessee, was accompanied by his mother, Erika Stokes. He plans to major in business administration. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Jordan Gossett of Memphis, Tennessee, said he visited TSU several times and fell in love with it.

“I just love the atmosphere; it just feels like a good HBCU experience,” said Gossett, who plans to major in business administration. “I am the first to attend an HBCU in my immediate family. Maybe I can be the start of a tradition in my family.”

TSU officials hope some new initiatives they’ve put in place will allow all students attending the university to have a good experience.

The initiatives include an “All Day Dining Plan” with 10 guest passes for each student who participates; an online specialty store for TSU paraphernalia; expanded parking access; enhanced parking permits to curb losses: and a personal alert system with Bluetooth capability that works with cell phones on and off campus.

“We are excited about our new students and the services we have put in place to make them comfortable,” said Dr. Curtis Johnson, associate vice president for administration.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

TSU President Glenda Glover says student success remains a priority

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – TSU President Glenda Glover says the university has several priorities which include improving retention and graduation rates, and creating new residence halls for students.

Glover addressed the Faculty and Staff Institute for the fall 2016 semester on Monday, August 15. While the university has its challenges, she said they must not overshadow the well-being of TSU’s most important customers: its students.

“We must never forget that we’re here because of the students,” Glover said. “We’re here for the purpose of enhancing their lives and their well-being, and ensuring the quality of their future.”

The president outlined steps TSU is taking to help students be more successful in college. They include the creation of a completion committee, block scheduling, and the formation of a consortium of advisors who will make sure that students stay on track to graduate.

Before Glover spoke, TSU Student Government president Aarian Forman addressed the crowd and said the Student Government Association is also committed to doing what it can to help students be successful.

Forman said the association is spearheading an initiative called START (Stimulating Transformative Academic Routines at TSU) that will have an academic achievement task force comprised of students, faculty and staff.

“We, as a TSU family – faculty, staff and students – have to continue to work together to make sure that we are successful as individuals and as a university,” he said.

Glover also discussed construction plans for building new student residence halls over several phases, the construction of a new football stadium, as well as acquiring land to build a transdisciplinary research center.

Other plans include: the development of higher admission standards; pay raises for faculty and staff; enhanced campus security; and implementation of the state’s new higher education governing structure, or the FOCUS Act.

Glover said regardless of the changes, and the challenges the university faces, she’s confident TSU will persevere.

“We’ve covered a lot of territory; we have a lot more to pursue,” she said. “This is an exciting time for us. The history of TSU is still being written.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.