Category Archives: NEWS

TSU College of Business Launches 12-Month Option for the MBA Degree

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The College of Business at Tennessee State University has announced a 12-month degree completion option for the Master of Business Administration. The program is designed for highly motivated students who are seeking to develop strong managerial competencies that are applicable in any business setting around the globe.

The 12-month MBA program offers the same core curriculum as TSU’s traditional MBA program with greater flexibility for the working adult. Ideally suited for the busy professional, the accelerated option offers convenient weekend classes on the Avon Williams downtown campus during the fall and spring semesters, and fully online classes during the summer. The accelerated alternative will enable graduates to expeditiously achieve the prestigious credential of an MBA degree from a business school accredited by AACSB International, the most prestigious accrediting body for business programs around the world.

For more information regarding the accelerated option and the traditional MBA program, email the College of Business Director of Graduate Programs at mba@tnstate.edu or visit our website at www.tnstate.edu/mba.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

From St. Louis and Across the Globe, New Students Descend on TSU Campus During Freshmen Move-In

Sara Franklin (center) was joined by her parents Dr. Sharilyn (left) and Clifford Franklin (right) during Freshmen Move-In August 21. The Franklins traveled from St. Louis and joined more than 1,200 first-time freshmen and new students move onto the Nashville campus. (photos by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)
Sara Franklin (center) was joined by her parents Dr. Sharilyn (left) and Clifford Franklin (right) during Freshmen Move-In August 21. The Franklins traveled from St. Louis and joined more than 1,200 first-time freshmen and new students move onto the Nashville campus. (photos by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Sara Franklin visited quite a few colleges before deciding on the school that best fit her academic goals and aspirations. Out of the many choices, the 18-year-old from St. Louis selected Tennessee State University based on one recommendation; one that she said influenced her more than any campus visit—a recommendation from the University President, Glenda Glover.

Franklin met Dr. Glover for the first time in Montreal at a conference. She said she was inspired by the accomplishments of the president, including the fact that the alumna was now the leader of one of the top Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in the country.

“She told me about the great programs at the University and how the school was a wonderful place for me to start my academic career,” Franklin said. “I was impressed by her credentials as a CPA and lawyer, and that is something I aspire to as well. I think this will be a good fit.”

Franklin joined more than 1,200 first-time freshmen and new students who moved onto the Nashville campus as part of “Freshmen Move-In Day” Thursday, Aug. 21, in preparation for classes that begin on Monday for the fall term.

Her parents, Mr. Clifford and Dr. Sharilyn Franklin, couldn’t be more pleased with their daughter’s choice, saying Tennessee State University not only offered strong academic programs, but research opportunities, which add institutional value, and a vibrant alumni relations program.

“These types of programs and opportunities speak volumes for the university,” said Sharilyn Franklin. “The world is shrinking and is now a global society, so to be able to network with alumni across the country and the world is something that will be very important once she (Sara) graduates and begins her professional career.”

Both parents were also impressed by the accolades of the University, and while it is a mid-size campus with nearly 9,000 students, it is still small enough to provide a nurturing environment.

“I have a lot of respect for HBCUs and the quality of education and support they provide for students,” said Clifford Franklin. “Sara is a product of private schools and I know this will be a life-enriching experience for her. I know she will get a great education here and a nurturing atmosphere that will help her grow.”

Gerald Davis (left) helps during new student move- in Thursday, Aug. 21. More than 200 volunteers, including student organizations, alumni, staff and friends  helped move nearly 1,200 students into their rooms during the annual tradition of Freshmen Move-In.
Gerald Davis (left) helps during Freshman Move- In Day Thursday, Aug. 21. More than 200 volunteers, including student organizations, alumni, staff and friends, helped move nearly 1,200 students into their rooms during the annual tradition of Freshmen Move-In.

More than 200 volunteers made Move-In Day easier for students like Sara. Student organizations, alumni, staff and friends helped to move luggage, boxes of personal belongings and other items, while other volunteers assisted with providing directions and staffing water and refreshment stations for new residents.

While temperatures soared into the mid-90s, volunteers did not let that damper their enthusiasm and excitement as they helped new students settle into their new homes. Among those helping was Samantha Thomas, a senior Dental Hygiene major and reigning Miss TSU.

“I think it was great that we had so many volunteers, from administrators and staff to older students, to show we really are one big family,” Thomas said. “The upperclassmen were definitely excited to help and welcome our new ‘Big Blue’ family members to help with their transition.”

And that is just what Sharilyn Franklin is counting on as her only child is now on her own for the first time.

“I love the sense and feeling of family here on campus,” she said tearing up. “I know my daughter will be in good hands, plus when she gets homesick it’s only a few hours away.”

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

NEWSBLOG_Take-15

Take 15: Increase in Course Load Can Mean TSU Diploma in Four Years

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – According to figures from Complete College America, if 100 students entered college today in Tennessee, only 17 would graduate on time at a four-year college. Now some of the nation’s top universities and colleges across the country, including Tennessee State University, are prodding lingering students toward the graduation stage to push them to finish their degrees in four years.

It’s a move that aims to change the culture that completing a degree in four years is the exception and not the norm.

Enter the ‘Take 15” program at TSU that encourages students to take enough credits to ensure on-time completion of their degrees. Launched in the fall of 2013 for full-time first-year students, the program has seen an increase of students opting to take at least 15 credits per semester to stay on track to receive their degree in four years.

According to TSU President Glenda Glover, University officials are taking steps to entice students to take at least 15 credit hours per semester and have a plan to complete their degree in the shortest amount of time possible.

“Often times full-time students fail to take enough credits to ensure on-time completion of their degrees,” said Glover. “Students regularly and often unknowingly choose credit loads that put them on five or six-year plans. Through this initiative we are getting the word out that on-time graduation is much more likely when students ‘Take 15’ to finish.”

While there could be many reasons why many students fall into the five or six-year degree trap, most students, according to Dr. John Cade, interim vice president of Enrollment Management and Student Support Services, enter college with a four-year plan, but changing or adding majors, retaking classes or taking time off for personal reasons can quickly extend that plan.

“While getting the most out of a college experience is important, taking additional semesters to earn that degree often means paying more in tuition and fees,” Cade said. “We’ve also seen that at times, the longer it takes students to graduate, the less likely they are to complete a degree.”

Since the initiative first rolled out in fall of 2013, officials at the University have seen an increase in students opting to go the 15-credit route. At that time, 41 percent of undergraduates, or 2,829 of the 6,749 students enrolled at the University, registered for 15 credits or more compared to the previous fall when only 31 percent registered. In just one short year, 35 percent more students were heeding the administration’s awareness initiative to ‘Take 15.’

“These are encouraging numbers,” added Cade. “As we build awareness we expect to see these numbers increase. We are promoting ‘Take 15’ because we are finding students are getting better grades, they are more focused and using their time more efficiently.”

Students, such as Thommye’ Davis, a senior History major, plan to graduate in four years by taking advantage of the Take 15 initiative and registering for 15 credit hours each semester. (courtesy photo)
Students, such as Thommye’ Davis, a senior History major, plan to graduate in four years by taking advantage of the Take 15 initiative and registering for 15 credit hours each semester. (courtesy photo)

Thommye’ Davis, a senior History major, is one of those students who is taking advantage of the initiative, and came to the University with the mindset of completing her degree in four years.

“I’ve been taking 15 credit hours since my freshman year of college,” said the Nashville, Tenn., native, who plans on teaching in the Nashville Metro School system after graduation. “If I wanted to finish in four years I knew that taking 15 credit hours would be the only way I could accomplish my goal.”

In addition to graduating in four years, studies show that students taking 15 or more credit hours tend to have higher grade point averages than those taking less. In fact, at TSU, students taking 15 or more credits averaged a GPA of 3.17 compared to students taking less.

Another reason for the push, Cade added, was the fact that earning a degree in four years is a lot cheaper than earning one in five or six. Students who complete their undergraduate degree in four years instead of six years can save close to $7,000 for in-state tuition or $19,000 for out-of-state students per year.

“The cost of college is high and students often times have to work to help pay the cost of tuition,” said Cade. “That is another advantage to completing a degree in four years. Students who elect to pursue completing their degree in five years incur a year of costs, plus loose a year of potential wages and on-the-job experience.”

The initiative also takes in account the fact that states are not expanding extra resources on higher education. With the passage of the Complete College Tennessee Act of 2010, the state has defined a clear set of directives to address the need for more Tennesseans to be better educated at a time when the state’s fiscal capacity to fund higher education has diminished dramatically.

Considered a national model for increasing the number and quality of college graduates, the CCTA recognized that in the past few years, public universities and colleges have lost a large portion of their state operating revenues. It also established a direct link between the state’s economic development and its educational system.

“We are in the same situation as many colleges and universities across the nation with states significantly cutting spending to education. These cuts and outcome-based funding are the primary drivers of tuition increases,” said Cade. “There is a demand for growth in education in Tennessee and across the country, and through the ‘Take 15’ initiative. We can make sure our students are prepared quicker and with less debt ready to enter the workforce.”

To learn more about the “Take 15” initiative, contact the Advisement Center at 615.963.5531.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University President Gives Upbeat Assessment of Institution as Faculty and Staff Return for New School Year

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TSU President Glenda Glover (center) cuts the ribbon to the newly renovated student dining hall following the faculty/staff institute. Also pictured are (left to right) Derrick Seay, general manager for Aramark; Dr. Curtis Johnson, associate vice president for Administration; Dave Parsonage, Aramark district manager; and Dr. Jane Jackson, executive vice president for Administration. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – From new programs intended to improve recruitment, retention and graduation, to enhancements in campus safety and emergency management, Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover today told faculty and staff that the University was making tremendous progress.

University outreach and visibility through positive news media, and alumni, corporate and individual giving were also very encouraging, while the University’s endowment has seen a remarkable growth, the President said at the fall faculty/staff conference on the main campus to welcome faculty and staff for the opening of the new school year.

While the announcement of all of these achievements received thunderous applauses, the biggest buzz was around the University’s new Book Bundle Initiative, a digital cutting-edge program aimed at lowering the cost of traditional textbooks.

The plan will allow freshman and sophomore students to buy “e-books” (downloaded on a tablet) for general education classes, saving students up to $735 per semester.

According to the President, a large number of students enrolled in classes do not purchase text books due to lack of funds, delay in receiving funds, or simply hold back on buying them for weeks.

“Many of our students would go weeks before even purchasing a text book, which in turn hurts them in the classroom,” the President said. “This new program allows students to have books the first day of class and gives them the ability to be successful since they will have the required materials.”

“Take 15,” an initiative that encourages students to take at least 15 credits each semester to graduate in four years, as well as “3+1 Program,” a dual (college/high school) enrollment program, are among other efforts the University is promoting to improve retention and graduation, Dr. Glover said.

Although “Take 15,” launched in 2013, has seen an increase of students opting to take 15 or more hours to stay on course, it will take a while to gather enough data to gauge its success, the President added.

Dr. Glover also announced a TSU Community College Initiative aimed at creating a seamless transition of two-year degree holders to TSU, in the face of the new Tennessee Promise, Gov. Hasslam’s education initiative that offers two years of tuition-free community or technical college to Tennessee high-school graduates beginning with the Class of 2015.

Through its newly launched initiative, Dr. Glover announced, TSU is reaching out to all 13 community colleges around the state to develop long-lasting partnerships and relationships through “2+2” or dual enrollment efforts.

In other areas that also drew cheers from faculty and staff, the President disclosed that the University has raised more than $9.5 million in giving to the University since she arrived on campus about 18 months ago.

“Our corporate partners, community stakeholders, alumni, faculty, staff and individuals have been very generous and supportive of our plea for support,” said Dr. Glover, who presented a check for $50,000 to her alma mater as her “first order of business” when she became president in 2012, challenging other alumni to follow suit.

“Our alumni alone have contributed more than $1.4 million, and many chapters have met or exceeded that match. We recognize that our alumni are the life of the institution and they have demonstrated their commitment to TSU by their giving and support of our programs,” the President added.

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On communications and public relations, the president touted a
reinvigorated media and public awareness campaign that has generated a more upbeat and positive image of the University. She pointed to more public engagement efforts such as the President’s Quarterly Media Brown Bag, that invites media professionals on campus to engage officials and staff on developments, and a litany of other endeavors that let the public know of “the good things that are happening at TSU.”

“We have billboards in strategic areas of town, including one in Memphis that tell of the quality of our education and our diverse offerings,” the President said.

She added that these are all part of a new public relations campaign that the University will soon officially kick off.

During a question and answer, where Dr. Glover and other administrators addressed faculty and staff concerns, the President reiterated her commitment to an open administration, where everyone has a voice.

“I applaud your support and contribution, and as we promised before, we will serve with fundamental fairness and openness. We will continue to seek your support and views in making decisions that move us ahead,” Dr. Glover said.

Following the President’s presentation, she invited administrators, faculty and staff to a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the newly renovated student dining facility in the Floyd-Payne Campus Center.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Holds Annual Tradition of Freshman Service Day Saturday, Aug. 23

TSU freshmen work at one of the community gardens in Nashville last year as part of the Annual  Freshman Service Day. This year's service day, The Big Blue Blitz, takes place Saturday, Aug. 23. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
TSU freshmen work at one of the community gardens in Nashville last year as part of the Annual Freshman Service Day. This year’s service day, The Big Blue Blitz, takes place Saturday, Aug. 23. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Incoming students at Tennessee State University will take part in an annual tradition Saturday, Aug. 23 that has become part of the freshman experience. Termed the “Big Blue Blitz,” more than 500 students will spread out over Nashville in an effort to give back to the community and build relationships with those in need.

According to Dr. Linda Guthrie, director of the Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement, the Day of Service is an opportunity for first-year students to get out into the community and experience its needs and culture beyond the TSU campus.

One of the goals is to help students connect with their new community and each other.

“This is basically neighbors helping neighbors,” said Guthrie. “This is a good way to introduce our new students to serving the community and become a part of their everyday life. We have a rich tradition of service at the University and try to instill in our students an strong ethic of caring and a sense of responsibility for making our community and world a better place.”

During the day, the University will see volunteers from around the campus including not only students, but also faculty, staff and alumni, pitch in at more than 20 different organizations that help needy, hungry and homeless people in the Greater Nashville area.

Volunteers will not only help at the University, but also Safe Haven, Project CURE and Nashville CARES, White’s Creek Community Garden, Earth Matters, and ThriftSmart in both Nashville and Franklin. Volunteers will also help out at the Nashville Food Project, Kirkpatrick Elementary School, Feed the Children and the Andrew Jackson Boys and Girls Clubs.

The service-day event takes place from 7 a.m. until 1 p.m. Volunteers will gather at the Gentry Center for transportation to area work sites, departing at approximately 7:30 a.m. and begin returning by noon. TSU officials encourage volunteers and students who are required to complete service learning hours aged to sign up at http://bit.ly/1sZ0Uty.

For more information, contact the Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement at 615.963.2920.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

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TSU Announces 2014 Homecoming Week Activities

University Celebrates Tradition of Excellence

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READ the full Homecoming Schedule

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will hold a week full of exciting events September 21-27 as community members, alumni and friends of the University come to Nashville to celebrate Homecoming 2014.

Homecoming is a rich, always anticipated tradition of the TSU community. Each fall, Tigers of all generations return to campus to reconnect and share memories. This year, alumni, family and community members will take part in Celebrating the Tradition of Excellence.

“There’s nothing like a Big Blue Homecoming. We look forward to welcoming all of our distinguished alumni back to the University for an exciting week filled with special memories, camaraderie and cheerful giving,” said Cassandra Griggs, director of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving. “This is the opportunity for alumni to see how their alma mater continues to positively transform the lives of its students, and learn about the outstanding academic programs, talented students and campus enhancements.”

HC7While TSU has cherished and maintained certain Homecoming traditions, it has also moved forward across the century, finding new ways to celebrate pride in the institution, its students and alumni. Innovations that have sprung up over the years include the parade, pep rally, Homecoming Court, tent parties and many additional campus activities.

The annual Robert N. Murrell Oratorical Contest will officially kick off Homecoming week on Sunday, Sept. 21 beginning at 3 p.m. in the Robert N. Murrell Forum in the Floyd Payne Campus Center. The Gospel Concert rounds out the evening, beginning at 6 p.m. in Kean Hall in the Floyd Payne Campus Center.

HC6Student events highlight Monday, Sept. 22 when the Courtyard Show takes place in Welton Plaza starting at 11 a.m., followed by the Battle of the Residence Halls at 7 p.m. in the Floyd Payne Campus Center Keane Hall gymnasium.

The All-White Glow Tent party will take place on Tuesday, Sept. 23 in Welton Plaza beginning at 7 p.m. The Coronation for Miss TSU and Mr. TSU takes place Wednesday, Sept. 24 in Kean Hall. Wednesday’s activities conclude with the non-Greek organizations’ Yard Show beginning at 9 p.m. in the Averitte Amphitheater.

Homecoming continues Thursday, Sept. 25 with the Agriculture and Home Economics Hall of Fame Banquet and Induction Ceremony at the Farrell-Westbrook Complex at 7 p.m. A Homecoming concert in the Gentry Complex starts at 7 p.m. and features August Alsina and Juicy J. Hosted by Lil Duval. Tickets are $15 in advance or $20 at the door for the general public. The evening concludes with the Alumni White-Out Mixer at the Sheraton Music City Hotel Ballroom.

HC1Friday, Sept. 25 kicks off with the traditional Charles Campbell Fish Fry at 11 a.m. on the President’s Lawn, followed by Pep Rally at 11:30 in Hale Stadium. The TSU National Pan-Hellenic Step Show begins at 5 p.m. at the Gentry Complex. Hosted by actress LisaRaye, tickets are $10 for students in advance, $15 at the door.

The evening concludes with the “Evening of Honors” Scholarship Reception and Gala beginning at 6 p.m. at the Music City Center. The night will honor TSU football great and Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee, Claude Humphrey, and Honors program educators Drs. McDonald and Jamye Williams, who have made advancing education and student success a priority during their more than 30 years at TSU. The evening will also address the needs of students to make sure they have the proper funding to acquire a college education to pursue their career goals and aspirations.

Saturday, Sept. 27 starts with the Homecoming Parade beginning at 9 a.m., followed by the Showcase of Bands at noon at Hale Stadium. The Homecoming football game between TSU and FAMU kicks off at 6 p.m. at LP Field.

View the 2014 Schedule and the campus map. For more information, contact the Office of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving at 615.963.5381.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Welcomes Newly Appointed Board of Regents Leader on Student Affairs

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Dr. Heidi Leming, assistant vice chancellor of Student Affairs for the Tennessee Board of Regents, speaks with members of the TSU Student Affairs division about her new role and how she can be an advocate for the institutions she serves. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Making TSU her first stop at a system four-year institution, newly appointed assistant vice chancellor of Student Affairs for the Tennessee Board of Regents today met with University officials and toured student facilities on campus.

Dr. Heidi Leming, the first person to hold the newly created position in the TBR, was received by Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dr. Mark Hardy, and Dr. Cheryl Green, assistant vice president for Student Affairs. She also held brief talks with the Executive Vice President for Administration, Jane Jackson; the Interim Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Support Services, Dr. John Cade; and Cynthia Brooks, vice president for Business and Finance.

“We are particularly pleased that the Tennessee Board of Regents has seen the need to appoint someone with the special role to advocate for students,” said Dr. Hardy, as he welcomed the new TBR official on behalf of TSU President Glenda Glover, who was away on travel. “We have a very cordial and fine relationship with people at the TBR, and we are glad for the leadership you will provide that directly affects our students.”

Leming, who earned a doctorate in higher education from the University of Georgia, joined the TBR recently. Since then, she has been visiting community colleges in the system.

Prior to coming to the TBR, she served in student affairs roles at institutions across the nation, including stops at Austin Peay State University, the University of Memphis, Moorhead State University and Virginia Tech. She also worked in the office of student affairs with the University System of Georgia.

“Dr. Leming comes well prepared to advocate on our behalf,” said Green. “We are excited that she comes with so much understanding of what we do, and we are confident that her experience at the University System of Georgia will be valuable in her new role.”

Earlier, Leming, a native of Rapid City, North Dakota, met in Dr. Green’s office with the deans and directors of the Division of Student Affairs to acquaint them with her new role.

“I view my role as an advocate,” she said. “I want to be a resource and to make sure your views are heard. Our objective is to hear from you and know the challenges you face and what kind of support we can give you to meet those challenges.”

The TSU student affairs staff expressed many concerns, primarily the inconsistency in services and resources among TBR institutions and how it affects recruitment and student success.

For instance, the group addressed inadequate and poor services in student housing, recreational and wellness facilities compared to the same services at other system institutions.

“I understand your challenges and I am passionate about working with you through those challenges,” Leming said. “One of our major goals as I take on this role is to see how we can bring about consistency across all of our institutions when it comes to student services.”

In other areas, the group discussed issues involving the Complete College Tennessee Act, sexual harassment and assault on college campuses, diversity and globalization, grant initiatives that provide funding for some student services, and resources in developing and maintaining data on student activities, among others.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

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Aristocrat of Bands Marches into History

TSU becomes first collegiate band to perform at Hall of Fame Halftime Show

Tennessee State University's Aristocrat of Bands performance concluded with a tremendous fireworks display during the Pro Foot Ball Hall of Fame Game at Fawcett Stadium in Canton, Ohio, on Sunday, August 3. Hall of Fame inductee Claude Humphrey was on the sidelines for the show. (photo by John S. Cross, TSU Media Relations)
Tennessee State University’s Aristocrat of Bands performance concluded with a tremendous fireworks display during the Pro Foot Ball Hall of Fame Game at Fawcett Stadium in Canton, Ohio, on Sunday, August 3. Hall of Fame inductee Claude Humphrey was on the sidelines for the show. (photos by John S. Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A visit to the Pro Football Hall of Fame game in Canton, Ohio, proved to be better the second time around for the Aristocrat of Bands when they became the first collegiate band to perform the halftime show in the game’s 51-year history.

The TSU marching show band, the only collegiate band ever invited to perform at the Hall of Fame game, was first invited in 2011 when TSU Tiger great and former Chicago Bear Richard Dent was enshrined. However, the Band never made it to the field due to the NFL lockout.

But like a scene from the 2002 movie, “Drumline,” the dynamic group wowed fans with their high-energy show in the Pro Football Hall of Fame stadium parking lot. While hundreds of fans showed up for the performance, it just wasn’t the same as performing at halftime, a show the AOB has become known for both in NFL and college stadiums across the country.

“It was a little disappointing but we were fortunate to be invited back a second time, this time for Claude Humphrey, the second TSU Tiger enshrined into the Hall of Fame,” said Dr. Reginald McDonald, acting director of Bands. “It was important for us to represent the University and to celebrate the achievement of one of our family members.”

The performance by Band, according to officials at the Pro Football Hall of Fame, is the first time a University band has played in the nationally televised halftime show at the annual enshrinement game that wraps up a weekend of festivities and induction ceremonies.

They can now add this honor to their already impressive list of firsts, including the first HBCU to play in a presidential inaugural parade in 1961; the first university, black or white, to play an NFL halftime show in 1955; and first HBCU invited to perform at the high school Bands of America Grand National Championships in Indianapolis last year.

“It really was an honor to not only perform for the enshrinement of one of TSU’s legendary football players, but also to bring part of the University to Canton and share our showmanship with the country. It’s something our students will never forget,” added McDonald.

AOB2The excitement started as soon as the 294-member Aristocrats ran onto historic Fawcett Stadium, a high school venue that seats only 22,000 fans. When the announcer asked the crowd if they were “ready to start the show,” the stadium erupted into deafening cheers and applause as the band broke into a rendition of “Happy” by Pharrel Williams. The eight-minute show concluded with the introduction of Humphrey, Dent and TSU president, Glenda Glover.

The show and participation in the HOF parade the day earlier, said McDonald, was an opportunity for the band to “puff out their chests.”

“This really was an opportunity to show off to the nation the high-energy showmanship of the Aristocrat of Bands,” he said. “I’ve been at the University for 14 years and director for four, and I can say this group is going to be a very special group this year and beyond.”

The Aristocrat of Bands now shifts their attention toward the John Merritt Classic halftime show at LP Field, Saturday, August 30.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

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Tennessee State’s Community College Initiative Fulfills Dream for Many Seeking Four-Year Degree

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – When Tiffani Clark decided to go back to college at age 28, she wanted to make sure that her tuition was affordable, she could attend classes close to home, as well as have the ability to easily transfer her community college credits to a university.

Clark did not have to look far.  Just a few miles from her Gallatin, Tennessee home, a 2+2 partnership educational program between Volunteer State Community College and Tennessee State University afforded her the opportunity she was seeking.

“I’m married with two small boys which made it difficult at times to get my college education,” said Clark. “Through the 2+2 and fast track programs, I was able to obtain my associate degree and continue my four-year degree with Tennessee State University. It’s challenging, but it’s a great program for me to be able to finish my bachelors degree in criminal justice.”

According to University officials, TSU is now creating more partnerships and programs with community colleges around the state to help students such as Clark, transfer seamlessly to the University to complete a four-year degree. Under the Community College Initiative, students have more options to move them along through their educational career.

Dr. Sharon Peters, director of the Community College Initiative Program, said the new initiative “just makes sense and is truly one of those win-win situations for everyone involved.”

“More and more students are choosing to pursue community college, as opposed to a university, right out of high school or as a nontraditional student because community colleges tuition costs are 50 percent less than four-year institutions,” said Peters. “Once they get their associate degree they will enter TSU as a junior and spend two years here, providing them with an opportunity to get their four-year degree from TSU.”

IMGP3189_2According to a report from the National Center for Education Statistics, as of fall 2012, 40 percent of all college undergraduates were enrolled in community colleges. TSU, added Peters, is committed to partnering with the Tennessee community colleges to create programs and initiatives focused on increasing the number of students prepared for transfer to the University.

“These programs and initiatives raise student achievement levels, close achievement gaps and successfully prepare a diverse population of students for academic and professional success,” said Peters. “Transfer preparation programs provide services such as regular and sustained advising, mentoring and early identification to improve student outcomes.”

According to Peters, the University is reaching out to all 13 community colleges around the state to develop long-lasting partnerships and relationships. Currently there are agreements with Volunteer State, Nashville State, Columbia State and Motlow State Community Colleges, with hopes to sign agreements with five additional institutions within the next year.

Programs through the initiative include the dual admission program where students gain early admission to TSU while completing an associate degree. These students receive a limited use student ID card that allows them to attend cultural and sporting events.  They also meet with TSU advisors early in their community college career.

One of the most popular programs is the 2+2 program, where students complete all four years at their community college. The program follows a national trend where professors from universities including TSU, are increasingly traveling to teach on the community college campuses, offering bachelor’s programs as part of new partnerships with two-year schools.

After completing an associate’s degree, community college students can transfer to a four-year program and complete a university bachelor’s degree right where they are. Currently TSU has partnerships with Volunteer State that offers the 2+2 program in Elementary Education, Criminal Justice and Nursing, and Criminal Justice at Motlow State Community College. Additional 2+2 programs in the near future are planned in Business, Health Sciences and Urban Studies.

Through these programs, students have numerous options to complete their four-year education, and help students who aspire to attend TSU save money by paying lower tuition at a community college for up to two years before transitioning to the University.

“That is exactly why I decided to go the 2+2 route,” said James Murphy, a junior Criminal Justice major who attends Volunteer State Community College and will graduate in December with a Bachelor of Science degree from TSU.

Murphy decided to stay on the campus for his TSU degree because it would be more convenient and cost less.

“The program has allowed me to work a fulltime job and take a full class schedule,” Murphy said. “Without it, I don’t think I would have been able to afford to go to school and finish my degree. Plus the instructors were very knowledgeable, the class sizes are usually small, and teacher-student interaction is encouraged.”

These new relationships and initiatives, Peters added, are programs that specifically focus on the Community Colleges and their needs, but also the needs of the larger community. And with Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam’s “Drive to 55” education initiative, TSU is prime to help lead the way for not only higher education, but for workforce and economic development.

“Of course we want to see growth in the number of transfer students that choose TSU, and a growth in the number of partnerships. More importantly we want to see partnerships between community college faculty and university faculty whereby they engage in joint research and curriculum design,” Peters said. “These types of partnerships benefit the students, the community and the state in our effort to insure that the majority of our citizens have a college degree.”

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Earning Degree in Sociology Made Easy With Tennessee State University Online Classes

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Whether you are a deployed-military personnel or spouse, a non-traditional student, or just overwhelmed with life’s activities to complete that sociology degree that has eluded you for years, TSU has just the answer for you.

Yes…online!

“Our program is now completely online,” said Dr. Oscar Miller, professor and chair of the Department of Sociology, Social Work and Urban Professions.

He said with all of the general education courses also offered online, busy students can now earn their bachelor’s degree in sociology without sitting in a classroom.

“All you need is access to a computer and the Internet; it is that simple,” Miller said.

With the uncertainty that comes with a military deployment – when families don’t know when or where their next assignment will be – or a nontraditional student who can’t find the time to finish their degree in a traditional setting, the online program offers just the right opportunity.

Shaconya Freeman, 38, of Springfield, Tennessee, agrees.

Shaconya Freeman, with her children and godson following her graduation with an associate’s degree from Volunteer State Community College, has been admitted into the TSU online sociology program this fall. (courtesy photo)
Shaconya Freeman, with her children and godson following her graduation with an associate’s degree from Volunteer State Community College, has been admitted into the TSU online sociology program this fall. (courtesy photo)

“This just works better for me,” said Freeman, a transfer student from Volunteer State Community College, where she earned her associate’s degree in sociology almost entirely online.

The mother of three, including an 11-year-old daughter, said between a demanding full-time job as an office manager in a doctor’s office, caring for her young child, a babysitter, homework and studying, there is very little time left to sit in a classroom.

“I tried taking some of my courses on the (Volunteer State) campus once and that was just too hectic for me,” Freeman said.

According to Miller, the demand for people with background in sociology is on the rise and projected to grow even higher. The overall goal of the TSU online program, he said, is to target military personnel and their spouses, as well as nontraditional students and “degree completers” like Freeman to provide them with the skills they need to be successful.

“Federal, state, and local government agencies, non-profit human and social services organizations and private sector companies are hiring sociology majors for their competencies in critical thinking, research and data analysis, group/team behavior, and cultural diversity,” Miller said.

Dr. Oscar Miller, Professor and Chair of the Department of Sociology, Social Work and Urban Professions, right, congratulates Austin Wyatt after his (Wyatt) graduation with a B.S. degree in Sociology from TSU last May.  Wyatt, a nontraditional student and married father of two children, earned his degree entirely online. (courtesy photo)
Dr. Oscar Miller, Professor and Chair of the Department of Sociology, Social Work and Urban Professions, right, congratulates Austin Wyatt after his (Wyatt) graduation with a B.S. degree in Sociology from TSU last May. Wyatt, a nontraditional student and married father of two children, earned his degree entirely online. (courtesy photo)

Austin Wyatt, a May 2014 TSU graduate with a B.S. in sociology, said his degree, earned entirely online, has opened doors to him that would not have been possible otherwise.

“It has enabled me to move away from the manual laborer status into an area where I can now pursue my interest and help me to provide for my family in a more meaningful way,” said Wyatt, a married father of two, who will begin a master’s degree program in anthropology at the University of Memphis this fall.

Calling his TSU degree a launching pad for a successful future career, the Starkville, Mississippi native, who now calls Memphis, Tennessee home, said he made some bad choices earlier in life that got him “off course” and nearly caused him to lose his family.

“With a child and wife, and working menial jobs, it hit me that I needed to do something to be a better provider for my family,” Wyatt said. “I was fortunate to find out that I could keep my busy schedule of working and help with the home and take classes right at home.”

Wyatt’s goal, he said, is to be an inspiration to others who think there is no way out because of mistakes of the past, or just having too much to do to find the time to earn a degree.

“It’s either I was going to lose my family or make some quick decisions. I decided to enroll in the TSU sociology program, and that’s the best decision I ever made. I am glad I did,” Wyatt added.

“And these are just the kind of people the program is designed to help,” Miller said, describing Wyatt as a “TSU success story.”

He said sociology is helping the skilled workforce demand of the nation by supplying leaders, managers, workers, and entrepreneurs who use their expertise and competencies to help organizations and communities improve.

“Sociology skills help our majors successfully adapt within our ever changing organizations and the dynamic labor market,” Miller added.

The Tennessee Board of Regents approved the online degree in sociology in 2011 and completed final preparations to offer the degree in the fall 2012. The program, one of many degrees offered online at TSU, currently has 15 students, Miller said.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.