Category Archives: NEWS

Historic total solar eclipse just a few days away, TSU scientist believes it will spark new interest in astronomy, research

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A Tennessee State University scientist believes the total solar eclipse on Monday will spark new interest in astronomy and TSU’s nationally recognized research.

Dr. Geoffrey Burks is an astronomer and associate professor of physics at TSU. He said the Aug. 21 event is once-in-a-lifetime, but its impact will probably be long lasting, particularly in the minds of youngsters.

“It’s just so rare to be able to see something in your lifetime where the sun is covered up in the middle of the day,” Burks said. “They’ll remember this a long time.”

TSU will have eclipse viewing events to recognize the historic day. They are planned from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hale Stadium on TSU’s main campus, and at Avon Williams, the university’s downtown campus. The event at the stadium will include comments from TSU President Glenda Glover, NASA engineer Dr. Virginia Tickles, TSU researchers, as well as performances by TSU’s Aristocrat of Bands. There will also be free food.

“It’s going to be a fun day,” said TSU Dean of Students Frank Stevenson. “We want it to be a day that you will remember where you were on this day. It will also be an opportunity to showcase a little bit of Tennessee State University.”

During a solar eclipse, the moon passes between the sun and Earth and blocks all or part of the sun for up to about three hours, from beginning to end, as viewed from a given location.

Typically, there are two solar eclipses each year somewhere on the Earth, but most of the time the very narrow path of the total eclipse is a shadow over the ocean.

The one occurring on Aug. 21 is unique because it crosses the entire United States, and Nashville is the largest city within the entire eclipse’s path.

The last time a total solar eclipse could be seen from Nashville was July 29, 1478, according to NASA. After Aug. 21, the next one visible from Nashville will be on Aug. 16, 2566.

“This is a big thing,” said Willie Moore, a junior civil engineering major at TSU. “I want to make sure I am in the right place to see it.”

Burks said the Aug. 21 eclipse might also draw more attention to astronomy research. At TSU, its research and astronomy professors have received national recognition. The university owns and operates eight robotic telescopes at the Robotic Observatory Center in the mountains of southern Arizona.

In 1999, a team led by TSU astronomer Greg Henry announced the discovery of a shadow of a planet crossing a distant star. The discovery made national and international news, and was lauded by then President Bill Clinton.

“I want America to know about your enormous contributions to research,” Clinton said the following year at a higher education leadership banquet in Washington, D.C. “I want every American to know … Tennessee State astronomers made the world’s first direct detection of a planet orbiting another star.”

Last year, Dr. Henry was part of a team of astronomers who discovered an extrasolar planet scientists say has the most eccentric orbit ever seen.

Highlights of the planned TSU eclipse events on Monday include:

  • Safe viewing presentation (Hale Stadium, 10:20 a.m.)
  • NASA speaker-Dr. Virginia Tickles (Hale Stadium, 12:05 p.m.)
  • The Solar Eclipse: What’s Happening Now? (Hale Stadium, 12:30 p.m.)
  • TSU Aristocrat of Bands performs (Hale Stadium, 12:45 p.m.)
  • Words from TSU President Glenda Glover (Hale Stadium, 1:10 p.m.)
  • Full solar eclipse; viewing also on plaza of Avon Williams Campus (1:27 p.m.)

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU welcomes new Tigers to the Big Blue family on freshman Move-In Day

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Lamonjae Romey got several offers from colleges and universities, but after learning about Tennessee State University and visiting its campus, the Big Blue sealed the deal.

TSU President Glenda Glover greets new freshmen. (Photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

“When we came here the first time, I just fell in love with the campus,” said Romey, an Indianapolis native who plans to major in nursing. “Right then, I decided that this is where I want to be.”

Romey was among about 1,500 new freshmen that arrived at TSU on Wednesday for Freshman Move-In Day.

“It’s always a pleasing sight to see new students and their families join our university family as they come to us as freshmen,” said TSU President Glenda Glover.

President Glover greeted many of the new students personally as she stood at the entrance of several residence halls during the move-in.

“It’s very important for these students to have a good start to the best college experience possible. I want them to study hard and do their best. Our move-in event is the first step to that experience. It’s a family thing like the slogan on our volunteer T-shirts read (display),” Glover said.

New TSU freshman Lamonjae Romey (center) with her mother, Latochia Rice (left), and grandmother, Doris Rice. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Freshman Shelby Sellers said she’s looking forward to attending TSU. She and her family drove about nine hours from Wisconsin on Wednesday. Sellers, who plans to major in biology, said what really attracted her to TSU was the kindness she was shown by faculty and staff when she visited the university.

“They seem to want to help you in everything; give guidance,” she said. “I really like the culture.”

Freshman Megan Davis of Knoxville, Tennessee, agreed.

“I could tell that the professors really care about students’ success,” said Davis, who plans to major in occupational therapy. “And I like the overall community.”

During the move-in Wednesday, a number of parents praised the helpfulness and organization of TSU’s staffers. Megan’s mother, Denise Davis, said she believes her daughter will be in good hands.

“My daughter just kept saying, ‘Mom, I really want to go to Tennessee State,’” Denise Davis said. “We came up for a couple of visits, and TSU sealed the deal.”

New TSU freshmen and their families enjoy some tasty barbecue. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Dr. Tracey Ford, vice president of student affairs at TSU, said the university wants students and their parents to know that good customer service is a priority.

“We’re very excited … to welcome new Tigers into our family,” Ford said.

In addition to the university’s great faculty and staff, a number of TSU freshmen said they want to be part of the unique experience only a historically black college or university can offer.

“I chose TSU because of my heritage and the history I can learn here,” said Memphis native Tavion McCullough, who will be majoring in business administration.

Activities were planned throughout Move-in Day for the new freshmen, including orientation and a barbecue for them and their families. Before they start class on Aug. 21, students will have an opportunity to participate in an open house to learn about their colleges and academic departments.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Total solar eclipse provides opportunity for TSU to showcase its excellence to the community

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is using the once-in-a-lifetime total solar eclipse to showcase its excellence to the community.

The university will have a “Blue and White Total Solar Eclipse Viewing Day Party” on Aug. 21 to recognize the historic day. Organizers expect as many as 10,000 to attend.

“It’s going to be a fun day,” said TSU Dean of Students Frank Stevenson. “We want it to be a day that you will remember where you were on this day. It will also be an opportunity to showcase a little bit of Tennessee State University.”

Events are planned from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hale Stadium on TSU’s main campus, and at Avon Williams, the university’s downtown campus. Both are free and open to the public.

The event at the stadium will include comments from TSU President Glenda Glover, TSU researchers, NASA engineer Dr. Virginia Tickles, as well as performances by TSU’s nationally acclaimed Aristocrat of Bands. There will also be free food.

Aug. 21 is also the first day of classes at TSU. Student Government Association President JerMilton Woods said the eclipse events are a chance to show incoming freshman what TSU has to offer.

“It’s a moment for us to kind of gather, love on each other as a family, and just watch something stellar happen,” Woods said.

The last time a total solar eclipse could be seen from Nashville was July 29, 1478, according to NASA. After Aug. 21, the next one visible from Nashville will be on Aug. 16, 2566.

“It’s going to be exciting,” said TSU junior Willie Moore of the Aug. 21 eclipse. “This is a big thing. I want to make sure I am in the right place to see it.”

Because of the large number of people expected to attend the TSU events on Aug. 21, TSU police plan to beef up security with additional patrols.

Highlights of the planned TSU eclipse events include:

  • Safe viewing presentation (Hale Stadium, 10:20 a.m.)
  • NASA speaker-Dr. Virginia Tickles (Hale Stadium, 12:05 p.m.)
  • The Solar Eclipse: What’s Happening Now? (Hale Stadium, 12:30 p.m.)
  • TSU Aristocrat of Bands performs (Hale Stadium, 12:45 p.m.)
  • Words from TSU President Glenda Glover (Hale Stadium, 1:10 p.m.)
  • Full solar eclipse; viewing also on plaza of Avon Williams Campus (1:27 p.m.)

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU President Glover outlines plans to increase student success and university growth at annual meeting of faculty and staff

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – “Let us work to make TSU the University of choice” was the charge Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover posed to faculty and staff during the university’s fall institute on Monday.

Hundreds of employees attended the annual event to get an update on year-long initiatives and plans for the upcoming academic year. Most importantly, they were reminded of the vital role they have in serving students and the university.

“We’re here for the purpose of educating our students,” President Glover said. “There must be a continued commitment to make a contribution each day, to make TSU better. Each year when I stand before you, I have great news on the progress we’re making, but there is more work to be done.”

Glover discussed the university’s new strategic plan that includes four goals: increase four-year graduation rates; ensure campus health and safety; improve customer service; and sustain/diversify revenue streams.

Called Impact 20/20, the plan also details the expansion of the campus’ physical footprint with the addition of two new academic buildings, Health Sciences and Engineering, along with two newly constructed residence halls to alleviate the growing need for housing.

Demetra Scruggs, a clinical supervisor in TSU’s Dental Hygiene Department, said she was motivated by the plans the president outlined.

“TSU is a great school,” Scruggs said. “And the initiatives Dr. Glover talked about today will make it even better.”

The president also said the university aims to increase student enrollment at least 5 percent by 2020.

To make that happen, she said the university is looking at ways to raise more money for student scholarships and research, which is among its challenges.

Despite its challenges, Glover said TSU has done an excellent job preparing students for the workforce, an accomplishment she hopes to build upon even more with new funding.

Recently, the university received a $2 million career development grant from the United Negro College Fund to provide TSU with the tools to prepare and ultimately help students secure employment immediately following graduation.

Other accolades included a recent ranking that showed TSU graduates average $48,100 in starting salaries.

EDsmart, a nationally recognized publisher of college resources and rankings, ranked TSU No. 6 out of the nation’s top 30 historically black colleges for highest starting salaries for graduates.

“When students see that they will graduate from this institution with a great projected salary, it makes the decision to attend TSU the obvious choice,” said Charles Jennings, Jr., director of the TSU Career Development Center.

Employees also heard from Dr. Mark Hardy, vice president for academic affairs; Dr. Achintya Ray, chair of the Faculty Senate; and Staff Senate Chair Linda Goodman, all of whom told faculty and staff they play a vital role in the success of TSU.

The faculty staff institute is held in August and January prior to the beginning of each academic semester.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Total solar eclipse could spur interest in astronomy, TSU scientist says

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The total solar eclipse on Aug. 21 could spur new interest in astronomy, said a Tennessee State University scientist.

Dr. Geoffrey Burks is an astronomer and associate professor of physics at TSU. He said the Aug. 21 event is once-in-a-lifetime, but its impact will probably be long lasting, particularly in the minds of youngsters.

“It’s just so rare to be able to see something in your lifetime where the sun is covered up in the middle of the day,” Burks said. “They’ll remember this a long time.”

TSU is having a “Blue and White Solar Eclipse Day Party” to recognize the historic day. Events are planned from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hale Stadium on TSU’s main campus, and at Avon Williams, the university’s downtown campus. The event at the stadium will include comments from TSU President Glenda Glover, TSU researchers, a NASA representative, as well as performances by TSU’s Aristocrat of Bands. There will also be free food.

Dr. Trinetia Respress, chair of TSU’s Department of Educational Leadership and one of the organizers of the events, said she believes Aug. 21 is a day students in particular will never forget.

“I think it’s something they will enjoy, whether you’re in science, or not in science,” she said.

During a solar eclipse, the moon passes between the sun and Earth and blocks all or part of the sun for up to about three hours, from beginning to end, as viewed from a given location.

Typically, there are two solar eclipses each year somewhere on the Earth, but most of the time the very narrow path of the total eclipse is a shadow over the ocean.

The one occurring on Aug. 21 is unique because it crosses the entire United States, and Nashville is the largest city within the entire eclipse’s path.

The last time a total solar eclipse could be seen from Nashville was July 29, 1478, according to NASA. After Aug. 21, the next one visible from Nashville will be on Aug. 16, 2566.

“This is a big thing,” said Willie Moore, a junior civil engineering major at TSU. “I want to make sure I am in the right place to see it.”

Burks said the Aug. 21 eclipse might also draw more attention to astronomy research. At TSU, its research and astronomy professors have received national recognition. The university owns and operates eight robotic telescopes at the Robotic Observatory Center in the mountains of southern Arizona.

In 1999, a team led by TSU astronomer Greg Henry announced the discovery of a shadow of a planet crossing a distant star. The discovery made national and international news, and was lauded by then President Bill Clinton.

“I want America to know about your enormous contributions to research,” Clinton said the following year at a higher education leadership banquet in Washington, D.C. “I want every American to know … Tennessee State astronomers made the world’s first direct detection of a planet orbiting another star.”

Last year, Dr. Henry was part of a team of astronomers who discovered an extrasolar planet scientists say has the most eccentric orbit ever seen.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU is on the big screen, Sept. 1 last day to catch it

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is on the big screen, and you have until Sept. 1 to see it.

The university’s Public Relations and Communications department has launched a marketing campaign to promote TSU’s excellence.

The university has placed ads in theaters across the region that highlight the new Executive MBA program, and the return of out-of-state tuition reduction. The campaign is scheduled to run during the summer peak months and will have some promotional features in the theaters’ lobbies as well.

The last day to catch TSU in theaters is Sept. 1.

The TSU family is encouraged to support their local theater and see Big Blue on the big screen.

Here are locations where the ads are currently running:

  • Atlanta, GA, Movies ATL, 3760 Princeton Lake Pkwy.
  • Birmingham, AL, Lee Branch 15, 801 Doug Baker Blvd.
  • Chattanooga, TN, Rave East Ridge Theater, 5080 S. Terrace
  • Springdale, OH, Springdale 18 Cinema DE Lux, 12064 Springfield Pike
  • Clarksville, TN, Clarksville Governor Square 10, 2801 Wilma Rudolph Blvd.
  • Cordova, TN, Malco Cordova Cinema, 1080 N. Germantown Pkwy.
  • Franklin, TN, Thoroughbred Cinema 20, 633 Frazier Dr.
  • Plainfield, IN, Metropolis 18, 2490 Metropolis Way
  • Louisville, KY, Stonybrook Cinemas, 2745 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy.
  • Smyrna, TN, Smyrna 12, 100 Movie Row (I-24 & Sam Ridley Pkwy.)
  • Southaven, MS, De Soto Cinema 16, 7130 Malco Blvd.
  • Nashville, TN, Regal Hollywood Stadium 27, 719 Thompson Ln.,
  • Nashville, Regal Green Hills Stadium 16, 3815 Green Hills Village Dr.
  • Nashville, Regal Opry Mills Stadium 20, 570 Opry Mills Dr.
  • Mt. Juliet, TN, Regal Providence Stadium 14, 401 S Mt. Juliet Rd.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU faculty, staff, students excited about total solar eclipse

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s faculty, staff and students are excited about the opportunity to see the once-in-a-lifetime total solar eclipse on Aug. 21.

“This is a big thing,” said Willie Moore, a junior civil engineering major at TSU. “I want to make sure I am in the right place to see it.”

Astronomers say solar eclipses are not uncommon. There are typically two of them each year somewhere on the Earth, but most of the time the very narrow path of the total eclipse is a shadow over the ocean.

The one occurring on Aug. 21 is unique because it crosses the entire United States, and Nashville is the largest city within the entire eclipse’s path.

The last total solar eclipse visible in Nashville was July 29, 1478, according to NASA. After Aug. 21, the next one that can be seen in Nashville will be on Aug. 16, 2566.

“I am really excited about it,” said Peggy Earnest, chief of staff, Office of Student Affairs at TSU. “We are just privileged. We won’t see this again in the same spot in many more years.”

During a solar eclipse, the moon passes between the sun and Earth and blocks all or part of the sun for up to about three hours, from beginning to end, as viewed from a given location.

On Aug. 21, the partial eclipse (when the moon starts to inch over the sun) begins at 11:58 a.m. The start of the full totality (meaning the sun is completely covered by the moon) in Nashville will begin at 1:27 p.m. and ends approximately 1:29 p.m. The partial eclipse ends at 2:54 p.m.

Viewers are asked to practice safety during the eclipse and not look directly at the sun, except when it is completely blocked during the period of total eclipse, or totality.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Largest Producer of Teachers in the Nation, New Ranking Shows

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Barris Johnson is not surprised that Tennessee State University is No. 1 among historically black colleges and universities in producing teachers.

“With the kind of rigorous curriculum students go through, TSU deserves to be at the top,” said Johnson, reacting to a new national ranking that lists the university as the highest producer of teachers among the nation’s Top 10 HBCUs.

Johnson holds a bachelor’s degree in music education, and a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from TSU. He teaches general music and band to 5th – 8th graders at East Nashville Magnet Middle School.

“In just my first year of teaching, I have done so well,” Johnson said. “The number one ranking … shows how hard the faculty and staff work.”

The ranking, by HBCU Lifestyle, a publication that focuses on black college living, noted that TSU’s undergraduate and graduate offerings and concentrations in biology, chemistry and elementary education made the school’s teacher preparation program more attractive. This is the second time in three years the publication has listed TSU as the top producer of teachers.

“Obviously we are very excited about this ranking,” said Dr. Mark Hardy, vice president for academic affairs. “This only shows that Tennessee State University is a leader in this area as is reflected in the quality of students we are graduating.”

Emmanuel Scott, of Atlanta, and a senior music education major, agrees. He said the program has been “everything” he was told when he first arrived at TSU.

“They told me that the program was good and I have not been disappointed,” Scott said. “So when I heard that we were No. 1, I already knew it.”

With a demographic shift that shows that more than 35 percent of students nationwide are black or Hispanic but less than 15 percent of teachers are black or Hispanic, experts say increasing the number of black teachers is critical. And TSU is helping to close that gap.

For the past two years, the university has been one of the top teacher preparation programs in the state, providing “exceptionally qualified” candidates for teaching positions, not only across the state and the southern region, but also the Metro Nashville Public Schools.

For instance, two years ago, as Metro wrapped up the year with the need to hire or name principals to new assignments for 2014-15, TSU-trained teachers and administrators answered the call. With the exception of three, all of the 10 principals hired or assigned received all or part of their training from TSU. At about the same time, 54 of the 636 new Metro teachers hired were TSU graduates, the second highest of all state or area universities. Only MTSU had more with 56. TSU had the number one spot the previous period.

Dr. Heraldo Richards, associate dean of the College of Education at TSU and director of teacher education, said the top ranking will draw even more attention to the great programs at TSU.

“As part of our intensive training program, we provide our students with not just a one-semester teaching experience as others do, but a year-long residency which enhances their competency when they come out,” Richards said. “As a result, many of the  ‘P-12 systems’ in the area and others from around the country, have been actively recruiting our candidates.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU helps to give youngsters, parents a “healthy start” back to school

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Kamaya Simpson will be prepared when she returns to school, thanks to Tennessee State University and Love’s Healthy Start Festival.

High school student Joel Snatcher with Dr. Latif Lighari from TSU’s College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Public Relations)

The university partnered with several organizations on Saturday to sponsor the 5th annual festival at Hadley Park.

Simpson, 9, was among about 300 people who turned out on a sunny, not-too-hot day to attend the event started by State Rep. Harold Love, Jr.

Hundreds of free backpacks and school supplies were given away at the festival. Simpson said she enjoyed being able to pick out her own backpack, because usually her mom does.

“My backpack was heavy with supplies for school,” Simpson said. “I like to go to school.”

Colette Mike attended the festival with her preschooler. She said the festival “is a good thing for the community.”

“It creates excitement for the kids about school, makes it fun,” she said. “And seeing everyone out here for them, adds encouragement.”

Rodney Pope, a grandfather of three, agreed.

“It’s very positive for the community,” Pope said. “It provides items that the kids need for school, which helps the parents.”

The festival, which had free food and live entertainment, also provided good health tips, as well as educational information.

For instance, parents were able to find out about initiatives like Tennessee Promise, which provides eligible graduating high school seniors two years of free tuition at a community or technical college in Tennessee.

“We want parents to know about the opportunity their children have to get a free education,” said Love, whose district includes TSU. “Love’s Healthy Start Festival is more than a back to school event. It is designed to give the entire family an opportunity to start the school year off right.”

Health screenings and dental exams were also available for youth and adults.

Leon Roberts is coordinator of clinics for TSU’s Department of Dental Hygiene. He said representatives from the department were on hand to discuss the benefits of good hygiene, as well as talk about the university’s Dental Hygiene Clinic.

The clinic provides service to nearly 600 patients a year, including students as well as the Nashville community.

“A lot of dental diseases can be easily prevented by brushing and flossing properly, and visiting the dentist at least twice a year,” Roberts said.

Other TSU participation included the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, and the Ralph H. Boston Wellness Center, which offers a range of sports, recreation and fitness activities for students, faculty, staff and alumni.

“We want the community to know the importance of health and wellness; taking care of yourself,” said Jerry Davis, Wellness Center director. “We also want to let people know what we do, as well as look to partner with outside agencies.”

The festival also featured literacy and financial education programs. For instance, the festival partnered with Book’em, a nonprofit organization, to provide 1,000 free books to youngsters in grades K-12.

For Simpson, getting the books was among the festival’s highlights.

“I like my books,” said the youngster. “I like books with adventure.”

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU scholars engage in critical discussions at inaugural R.A.C.E. Mentoring Conference

By K. Dawn Rutledge

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University students, faculty and administrators represented the university in full force at the first R.A.C.E. Mentoring Conference hosted by Vanderbilt University, July 14-16.

The inaugural gathering welcomed more than 160 doctoral students, higher education faculty and P-12 educators from across the country for three days of workshops, panel discussions and networking opportunities. As a partner in the effort, TSU’s School of Graduate Studies and Professional Studies sponsored more than 30 graduate students, faculty members, and administrators to take part in the conference. Title III’s Graduate Student Services program also sponsored five female Ph.D. students in Engineering and Biological Science.

Dr. Lucian Yates, III, Dean of the School of Graduate and Professional Studies, second from left; and Associate Dean, Dr. Alex Sekwat, participate in a discussion at the conference. (Photo by K. Dawn Rutledge, TSU Media Relations)

“I am pleased that the TSU’s School of Graduate and Professional Studies was able to co-sponsor the inaugural R.A.C.E. Mentoring Conference at Vanderbilt University,” said Dr. Lucian Yates, III, dean.  This event gathered students, faculty and administrators of color from around the country to discuss issues, problems and how to collaborate on navigating the academy and publishing. The preliminary results were overwhelmingly favorable and participants indicated that it was one of the best conferences they ever attended.”

R.A.C.E., an acronym for Research, Advocacy, Collaboration, and Empowerment, was created by Dr. Donna Y. Ford, a professor at Vanderbilt Peabody, and colleagues, Dr. Michelle Trotman Scott and Dr. Malik S. Henfield in 2013. The R.A.C.E. Mentoring Conference provides an outlet for scholars of color to exchange ideas and information, receive advice on publishing, and garner support as they seek to obtain advanced degrees and advance in higher education and P-12 settings.

“Many students are interested in publishing and this conference allowed them to build several relationships and contacts; many tell me they will be publishing really soon,” Yates said. “The currency in our profession are publications and this conference was designed to help students and faculty in the publishing process.”

Along with publishing opportunities, other important topics focused on the challenges that students and faculty face in career advancement as well as navigating and debunking stereotypes, among other critical discussions.

“Attendance at the inaugural R.A.C.E. Mentoring Conference is especially important because it allowed TSU student, administrators, and faculty of color the opportunity to meet other scholars of color from across the county and experience the importance of intellectual flexibility and maturity through academic writing, teaching, and service,” said Dr. Andrea L. Tyler, director of Graduate Student Services and Research Associate for Title III. “In short, the R.A.C.E. Mentoring conference provided a foundation from which to build from and aspire to.”

As a co-sponsor of the conference, TSU joined Vanderbilt in welcoming several institutions, including other HBCUs such as Illinois State University, Howard University, and Texas A&M University, to name a few.

Among other TSU faculty and administrators involved in the conference included Dr. Alex Sekwat, Dr. Stashia Emanuel, Dr. Charles Brown (Public Health), and Dr. Kisha Bryan (Teaching and Learning).

Department of Media Relations

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About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.