Category Archives: NEWS

TSU Looks to Change Landscape by Enhancing Its Continuing Education Offerings

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – No time for a traditional class schedule? Real estate, mobile app development, and entertainment legalese are just a few areas working professionals can now explore by taking self-paced noncredit courses at Tennessee State University.

This expansion represents another milestone in the university’s efforts to bridge the digital divide and position itself as a leader in the area of continuing education.

Dr. Evelyn Nettles, TSU associate vice president for academic affairs, said she is excited about the new dimension of programming this partnership is adding to the continuing education program.

Andrew Golden, a Nashville native, is currently pursuing certifications through the TSU Continuing Education Program.

“The university offers a variety of things for a variety of people,” she said. “It offers credit for those people who really want to get their degree. And for those people who want to improve what they already have, we offer a noncredit program.”

Some of the specialized courses life-long learners can take at TSU will include classes on women in leadership, helping minority youth and police work together, second-chance reentry programs to help inmates when they return to society, and social media marketing courses.

This development is part of an agreement with Aperion Global Institute (AGI), a unique digital educational model of network affiliates that have a direct focus on erasing the digital divide in education.

“The collaboration with Aperion Global Institute will allow Tennessee State University to expand its noncredit course offerings by helping the university expand its presence in high-demand markets,” said Dr. Mark Hardy, TSU vice president of academic affairs.

“The web portal through AGI is attractive and designed so that potential students can readily find the specific course or courses of their choosing.  This is also expected to increase the number of students who sign up for various courses through AGI.”

Costs for the courses range from $99 for a typical four-week course to $297 for a 12-week course. Students can take the courses on their mobile phones and tablets or through AGI’s digital TV channel. All the courses have been loaded on an SD (secure digital) card.

Isiah Reese, chief executive officer of AGI, said this venture gives professionals, entrepreneurs and those who have not finished school an opportunity to enhance their skills and stay relevant using a self-paced platform.

“The beautiful part is that we have open enrollment 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year,” Reese said.  “A lifelong learner can start a course with us any day of the week from anywhere in the world.  It’s an open platform to keep the learning flowing.”

This flexibility attracted Andrew Golden, a Nashville native who attended Howard University last year, but found himself unable to return for the current academic year.

“I spoke with Isiah, and when I shared my career goals, he began to explain to me what this program offers,” Golden said. “It just made sense to me to go ahead and pursue some of the things I was already planning to pursue after graduation.  Getting that done now and getting some experience in those various fields give me a head start for when I graduate.”

Golden who is currently pursuing certifications in security plus, networking plus, and Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP), has been accepted as a full-time student at TSU in the computer science program.

Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the TSU College of Engineering, expressed excitement about Golden’s acceptance into the program.

“With a strong demand for IT professionals in Middle Tennessee and the nation, I believe our program is well suited for Mr. Golden, that is affordable and will provide the right credentials for employment or entrepreneurship,” Hargrove said.

According to Hargrove, less than 20 percent of programs in computer science are nationally accredited. However, he said the TSU Department of Computer Science is accredited by the Accrediting Board of Engineering & Technology (ABET), and provides an academic experience of IT knowledge to pursue a career in software development, networking, cybersecurity, or information systems.

“Ultimately, I want to be in mobile app development and cybersecurity,” Golden said. “Growing up there was so much I was unable to see in terms of being exposed.  I want to be in a position not just to say I have this and that, but to say this is what you have the potential to be.”

Dr. Cheryl Seay, director of distance education and multimedia services at TSU, said expanding the university’s continuing education offerings with AGI is part of TSU’s efforts to revitalize its continuing education program.

“Aperion Global Institute’s uniqueness in this space is their developing relationships with well-known figures in certain areas and then offering a bundle of courses associated with those individuals,” Seay said.

AGI’s high profile experts, also known as Global Education Ambassadors, are committed to erasing the digital divide. They include prominent individuals like entertainment attorney Ricky Anderson, whose clients include Steve Harvey, Mo’Nique, Rickey Smiley, Yolanda Adams and Mary Mary; civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump, who worked on the Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown cases; Digital marketing expert, speaker, start-up consultant and author Yoli Chisholm; and Keith Clinkscales, founder and former chairman and CEO of Vanguarde Media.

“Our first mission is to have a high completion rate. We want them to have a unique and engaging experience,” Reese said.

TSU awarded more than 800 continuing education units (CEU) in the 2016-2017 academic year. According to  a majority of those awards were from courses taught by various campus departments or external agencies.

Nettles said the continuing education department is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

“What we offer is quality programming for our whole community, and now the global community,” she said.

To explore the new courses offered by Tennessee State University’s Continuing Education Department, visit www.tnstate.edu/continuinged .

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Tennessee Sate University Students Win Top Awards at National Honors Conference

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University students won two first-place awards at the 26th annual conference of the Association of African American Honors Programs held this month at Morehouse College in Atlanta.

Kalynn Parks won first place in research presentation for her study on the effects of hypertension. (Submitted photo)

More than 400 honors students, directors and faculty from 33 HBCUs across the nation participated in research presentations, academic competitions, career and graduate fairs, a quiz bowl, a model African Union, and talent competition Nov. 9-12.

TSU’s Kalynn Parks, of Atlanta, a senior biology major, won first place in research presentation for her project on “Sympathoexcitation and Increased Sodium Chloride Cotransporter Activity in Hypertensive Aged Sprague Dawley Rats.”

Leona Dunn, left, Jerry Tibbet and Alliyah Muhammed received a trophy for winning first place in the Model African Union competition. (Submitted photo)

In the Model African Union completion, the three-person TSU team, representing Kenya, walked away with first place. They included Jerry Tibbet, sophomore aeronautical and industrial technology major from Kenya; Leona Dunn, senior communications major from Omaha, Nebraska; and Aliyah Muhammed, freshman computer science major from Memphis.

“This conference provided an amazing opportunity not only to present my scientific research, but to be immersed in an environment with likeminded people who also looked like me,” said Parks, about her research on the effects of hypertension, which affects about one in three American adults.

Dr. Coreen Jackson, interim dean of the TSU Honors College, said she was amazed at Parks’ presentation.

“Kalynn was flawless in her poster presentation,” Jackson said. “I watched as the judges rigorously critiqued her methodology and findings. Ms. Parks confidently responded in a respectful manner to every question presented and argument raised by the judges. She held her own because of the depth of her knowledge and understanding of her work.”

Overall, Jackson said the 19 TSU students at the conference were outstanding in every aspects of their participation.

Tibbet, who served as the head delegate on the TSU Model African Union team, said he looks forward to one day participating in a “real United Nations General Assembly.

“It was very honorable and enlightening to represent TSU and to be a delegate to Kenya,” said Tibbet, who grew up in the East African nation. “Winning the award showed me that ideas could be turned into resolutions.”

The NAAAHP Annual Conference brings together Honors students, faculty, staff and professionals from HBCUs and PBCUs throughout the United States. TSU hosted the conference in 2016 with Jackson serving as national president.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Holidays bring increased demand for goat meat, TSU experts say

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Looking for an alternative to turkey this Thanksgiving? Try goat meat.

Goat meat dish at Jamaicaway restaurant in Nashville. (photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Public Relations)

Experts in Tennessee State University’s College of Agriculture say the holidays, particularly Thanksgiving and Christmas, bring increased demand for goat meat – a national area of research for TSU.

“Just like turkey, goat is kind of a holiday meat, for a lot of different cultures,” said Dr. Richard Browning, lead goat researcher at TSU, which has received nearly half a million dollars from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to expand its research on goat meat production.

As the holiday season kicks in, immigrants, in particular, flock to butcher shops, meatpacking plants, farms, and any place that provides goat meat, according to researchers.

Ouida Bradshaw owns two Jamaicaway restaurants in Nashville and has had goat meat on her menu since she opened 14 years ago. She said this time of the year she starts to see an increase in orders for goat meat.

“There’s definitely an increase around Thanksgiving and Christmas,” Bradshaw said. “People put in special orders. They use it as one of their entrees for their Thanksgiving and Christmas celebration.”

Besides being tasty, goat meat enthusiasts say it’s a healthier choice of meat because its naturally lean, meaning it is much lower in saturated fat and cholesterol, having a naturally higher HDL count (the good cholesterol) and a naturally low LDL count (the bad kind of cholesterol), according to the National Kiko Registry. It is also lower in calories than other meats, like beef, and is easier to digest.

Whether it’s goat meat, turkey or any other holiday fixings, Dr. Sandria Godwin, a family and consumer science professor at TSU, said people should make sure they properly handle food.

For instance, if turkey is the main entrée, then she said a thermometer should be used to make sure it’s fully cooked – usually 165 degrees Fahrenheit.

But probably most important, Godwin said, is to make sure that leftovers don’t remain out over two hours.

“Some people leave food out and eat it throughout the day, but that’s not safe,” said Godwin, whose Human Sciences Department at TSU has received a $2.4 million USDA grant to study poultry and food safety.

“It should go in the refrigerator within two hours.”

For more information about TSU’s Human Sciences Department and food safety, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/familyscience/foodnutrition.aspx

For more information about TSU’s goat research, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/faculty/rbrowning/

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

 

Renowned Journalist and CNN Political Analyst April Ryan to Give Fall Commencement Address at Tennessee State University

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – April Ryan, a renowned journalist, White House correspondent and nationally syndicated radio host, will deliver the commencement address when Tennessee State University holds its fall graduation ceremony on Saturday, Dec. 9.

The commencement will take place in the Howard C. Gentry Complex on the main campus, beginning at 9 a.m. Nearly 450 undergraduate and graduate students will receive degrees in various disciplines.

Ryan, described as “having a unique vantage point as the only black female reporter covering urban issues from the White House” since the Clinton administration, is also known for her “Fabric of America” news blog syndicated through close to 300 radio affiliates.

She is the Washington bureau chief and White House correspondent for the American Urban Radio Networks, and can be seen almost daily on CNN as a political analyst.

As a White House correspondent, Ryan has covered four presidential administrations. Following the election of President Donald Trump, Ryan gained notoriety after notable exchanges with him and his then-press secretary, Sean Spicer.

She has been featured in Vogue, Cosmopolitan and Elle magazines, The New York Times, The Washington Post – to name a few.  Ryan is the 2017 National Association of Black Journalist’s Journalist of the Year, and a Terker Fellow with the George Washington University School of Media and Public Affairs.

A Baltimore native, Ryan has served on the board of the prestigious White House Correspondents Association, and one of only three African Americans in the Association’s over 100-year history to serve on its board. She is also an esteemed member of the National Press Club.

Ryan is the author of the award-winning book, “The Presidency in Black and White,” and “At Mama’s Knee: Mothers and Race in Black and White,” where she looks at race relations through the lessons and wisdom that mothers have given their children.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Faculty, Staff Contribute more than $141,000 to Keep Students in School

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University faculty and staff are making sure students stay in school through their gifts.

On Saturday, Nov. 11, before a cheering crowd in Hale Stadium, the group presented President Glenda Glover with a check for $141,451 as part of their commitment to scholarship and student support.

The presentation was made during the halftime show of the game between TSU and Southeast Missouri.

Glover called the faculty and staff contribution “a very personal and strong commitment to our students’ needs.”

“We appreciate the faculty and staff for their commitment to help students remain in school,” Glover said. “It shows dedication from all elements of the university – from the faculty and staff to alumni, students, the community – because we are one big TSU family.”

Dr. Achintya Ray, chair of the Faculty Senate, said faculty and staff are “solidly behind our students” and their learning needs.

“I am very proud of the faculty and staff commitment to this great institution and what they are doing for our students, so that they can graduate and go on and make great careers for themselves and make us proud,” Ray said.

Linda Goodman, chair of the Staff Senate, agreed.

“We are committed to make all possible contributions that we can to help our students matriculate through to graduation,” Goodman said. “We care about our students and we thank them for choosing TSU, because if they weren’t here, we wouldn’t be here either.”

Participating in the check presentation along with Ray and Goodman were Eloise Abernathy Alexis, associate vice president of Institutional Advancement; Cassandra Griggs, director of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving; and Rosalyn Word, co-chair of the Faculty Staff Annual Giving Campaign.

Alexis said the check from the faculty and staff was part of their 2016-17 commitment.

“Today is an exciting moment because not only do our faculty and staff give of their time, talent and treasure every day in support of out students, but also go into their own hard-earned dollars to give back to the TSU Foundation to support the various programs, scholarships, academic programs and others,” she said. “It says to outsiders that those who are closest to our TSU experience love it enough to sacrifice to give. And so why wouldn’t others?”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU honors alumnus and Medal of Honor recipient at Veterans Day program

Dr. Mark Hardy, TSU’s vice president of academic affairs, addresses Veterans Day attendees. (Photo by Lucas Johnson, TSU Public Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee Congressman Jim Cooper joined community leaders and other lawmakers at a special Veterans Day program at Tennessee State University on Friday that posthumously honored an alumnus and Medal of Honor recipient.

Lt. William McBryar, a Buffalo Soldier, was awarded America’s highest military decoration for his actions on March 7, 1890, during the Cherry Creek Campaign in the Arizona Territory. According to his citation, McBryar was distinguished for “coolness, bravery and marksmanship” while his 10th Cavalry troop was in pursuit of hostile Apache warriors.

“Medal of Honor recipients … are some of the most outstanding people in all of our nation’s history,” Cooper said after the program. “I’m so proud that a TSU graduate received that medal.”

Dating back to the Civil War, there have been 3,498 Medal of Honor recipients. Of that number, 90 are black – and Lt. McBryar is one of them.

Wreath honoring veterans. (photo by John Cross, TSU Public Relations)

“We are acutely aware of the paucity of African Americans who have received such an honor,” said Dr. Mark Hardy, TSU’s vice president for academic affairs.  “We are very excited to be one of the institutions to have been a part of the educational experience our Medal of Honor recipient, Lt. William McBryar, received many years ago.”

Lt. Col. Sharon Presley, Air Force ROTC Det 790 commander stationed at TSU, echoed Hardy’s sentiment.

“From the perspective of a military officer, to know of someone who achieved the nation’s highest honor, is awe-inspiring,” Presley said. “He was a soldier’s soldier.”

Dr. Learotha Williams, an associate professor of history at TSU, gave a tribute to McBryar during the program. He lauded McBryar for overcoming racial barriers, and for his bravery.

“This is the kind of guy who was running toward gunfire, rather than seeking cover,” Williams said.

Dr. Learotha Williams, associate professor of history at TSU, gives tribute to Lt. William McBryar. (photo by John Cross, TSU Public Relations)

McBryar went on to serve with the 25th Infantry in the Spanish-American war and fought at El Caney, Cuba. He also saw action in the Philippine Insurrection before demobilizing in San Francisco.

In 1906, after leaving the military, McBryar moved to Greensboro, North Carolina as a civilian and there he married Sallie Waugh, a nurse. Three years later, he worked as a watchman at Arlington National Cemetery and as a military instructor at what is now Saint Paul’s College.

In 1933, with a desire to complete his degree, McBryar attended Tennessee Agricultural & Industrial State University. He graduated the following year, at age 73, with an agriculture degree, finishing a college education that started at Saint Augustine’s University before he enlisted in the military.

McBryar went on to write for “The Bulletin,” a publication at Tennessee State, addressing issues related to social justice and developments in Germany

Dale Rich, a nationally recognized Medal of Honor researcher, began collecting information on McBryar more than 30 years ago after seeing his name on a list of Medal of Honor recipients at the National Archives and Records Administration. When he discovered McBryar graduated from Tennessee A&I, he made copies of the documents he gathered about McBryar and sent them to TSU where they are in special collections in the university’s library.

Medal of Honor researcher Dale Rich with portrait of Lt. William McBryar. (photo by John Cross, TSU Public Relations)

Rich attended Friday’s Veterans Day program at TSU, and said he’s glad to see McBryar being honored.

“We should never allow any of our heroes to be forgotten,” Rich said. “He was an outstanding person.”

Keshawn Lipscomb is NCOIC of administration management in TSU’s AFROTC program. He said the university is fortunate to have the materials Rich collected on McBryar.

“That’s what’s really allowed us to honor him (McBryar) here today,” Lipscomb said.

Tennessee Rep. Harold Love, Jr., said McBryar’s story should encourage non-traditional students considering completing a degree, or pursuing one..

“For him, education at 73 was not about getting a job, but it was about completing something he had started,” Love said. “And so, for students out there, we say, keep pushing, keep striving, let this story inspire you.”

McBryar died in 1941 at the age of 80. He is buried at Arlington National Cemetery. A Tennessee Historical marker honoring him will be unveiled at TSU early next year.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University to Host National Higher Education Emergency Management Conference

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University has been selected as the host institution for the 2018 Best Practices in Higher Education Emergency Management Conference May 22-24.

The sixth annual conference will bring together more than 200 emergency management practitioners, first responders, consultants and volunteers to share best practices and lessons learned.

TSU was awarded the Best Practice Trophy for its unique urban-agriculture and cutting-edge emergency preparedness initiatives. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

TSU, the first HBCU selected to host the conference, was recognized for its unique urban-agriculture and cutting-edge emergency preparedness initiatives that have earned the university many accolades including a Storm Ready designation.

As a result of the recognition, TSU was presented with the Best Practice Trophy at this year’s conference at Virginia Tech, and subsequently selected to host the 2018 conference.

“We are honored to be selected as the host of next year’s conference,” said Dr. Curtis Johnson, associate vice president for administration and chief of staff. “We have made major strides in preparing the university against natural disaster and acts of terrorism. To be recognized as a Best Practice institution shows that Tennessee State University is in the right direction in ensuring that we provide a safe and secure environment for our students, staff and faculty.”

Thomas Graham, director of TSU’s Office of Emergency Management, said TSU looks forward to the conference and to let participants from other institutions see some of the initiatives TSU has put in place to keep its campus safe.

Graham noted that TSU offers “several preparedness classes for faculty, staff and students, as well as alumni and the Jefferson Street community.”

For more information about Emergency Management, the conference, and to find out about preparedness classes, visit

http://www.tnstate.edu/emergency/emconf2018.aspx

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU choir members part of spirited performance at 51st CMA Awards

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Members of Tennessee State University’s Choir  joined a Nashville ensemble in a spirited performance at the recent 51st Country Music Association Awards in Nashville.

Members of the Tennessee State University Choir served as backup singers at the Country Music Association Awards Wednesday night. (Submitted photo)

The choral students appeared as backup singers to some of the biggest names in country music, including Darius Rucker, Keith Urban, Carrie Underwood, Garth Brooks and Reba McEntire. The students were invited along with the Portara Ensemble, to kick off the CMA Awards, which was broadcast live on national television from the Music City Center.

“It was an amazing experience with about 20,000 people in the audience cheering us on,” said Dre Pinson, a senior general music education major from Nashville, who is president of the TSU Choir. “Talk about adrenaline rushing out, talk about the pressure. They were very polite and very welcoming, especially when they realized that we were from TSU. They were very honored to have some local people behind them to support them.”

Thomas J.  Taylor III, another member of the choir, said he was glad to have the opportunity to once again showcase TSU’s excellence.

“Thanks to our director, Dr. (Susan Kelly) for putting us out there,” said Taylor, a junior music education major from Nashville. “I was excited that we were going to be in front of all those people on live TV.”

Dr. Kelly described the invitation from the CMA and the experience as “very humbling.”

“We got to not only sing with, but to interact with, some of the greatest Country Music artists alive today,” she said. “Our students are doing great things and I am proud to say that I teach at TSU!”

For more information on the Tennessee State University Choir, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/music/choir.aspx

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU Research May Prevent Unnecessary Hurricane Evacuations

A team of engineers, including Dr. Muhammad K. Akbar, Tennessee State University Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, is diligently working to more accurately predict which areas should be evacuated during threats of hurricanes.

Dr. Muhammad K. Akbar

Akbar said when people are asked to evacuate unnecessarily, they lose trust and become less likely to evacuate when future warnings are given. Accurate surge storm predictions save lives and properties through timely evacuations, he said.

The team is developing a new implicit solver-based storm surge model called CaMEL(Computation and Modeling Engineering Laboratory).  It is being evaluated against ADCIRC (ADvanced CIRCulation Model), an established storm surge model.  Akbar said that while the ADCIRC model is faster, CaMEL is more stable.

Storm surge, according to the National Weather Service, is the change in the water level that is due to the presence of the storm. Storm surges are caused primarily by the strong winds in a hurricane or tropical storm.

Akbar said they input meteorological data approximately every six hours to forecast the hurricane’s wind track and strength for the entire duration through its landfall and beyond. Their results help emergency management to communicate with first responders which areas should be evacuated.

“Our goal is to merge the good features of both models in one to improve our prediction capabilities,” he said.  Scientists are working on different fronts to understand the complex physics of hurricanes and evolution of storm surges.

“Understanding the underlying physics will help us to improve the prediction capabilities of hurricane storm surges,” Akbar said.  “An accurate storm surge model could save millions of dollars by preventing unnecessary evacuations.”

A native of Bangladesh, Akbar cites the devastation caused by the Bhola Cyclone that killed nearly 500,000 people in his homeland in 1970, as one of the major motivations for his research.

Aided by a $209,403 grant from the National Science Foundation, Akbar also receives funding from the Department of Homeland Security and the US Army Engineer Research and Development Center.

Part of his work includes advising graduate students like Kyra Bryant, who is currently pursing a doctorate in Computer Information Systems Engineering at TSU. Bryant received the Graduate Master’s Thesis Award in February at the Tennessee Conference of Graduate Schools for her research on storm surges.

“Receiving the award is a great honor for Ms. Bryant, and all of us at Tennessee State University,” Akbar said. “It is an encouragement and motivation for us to advance the research to the next level.”

According to NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, each year, the United States averages some 10,000 thunderstorms, 5,000 floods, 1,300 tornadoes and two Atlantic hurricanes, as well as widespread droughts and wildfires. Weather, water and climate events, cause an average of approximately 650 deaths and $15 billion in damage per year and are responsible for some 90 percent of all presidentially-declared disasters.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU plans special Veterans Day program on Nov. 10 to honor alumnus and Medal of Honor recipient

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will honor its veterans on Nov. 10 and pay special tribute to a university alum and Medal of Honor recipient.

Lt. William McBryar, a Buffalo Soldier, was awarded America’s highest military decoration for his actions on March 7, 1890, during the Cherry Creek Campaign in the Arizona Territory. According to his citation, McBryar was distinguished for “coolness, bravery and marksmanship” while his 10th Cavalry troop was in pursuit of hostile Apache warriors.

McBryar died in 1941 at the age of 80, but he will be honored posthumously at TSU’s Veterans Day program. McBryar was 73 when he got his bachelor’s degree in agriculture from then-Tennessee Agricultural & Industrial State University.

Dating back to the Civil War, there have been 3,498 Medal of Honor recipients. Of that number, 90 are black – and Lt. McBryar is one of them.

“We are acutely aware of the paucity of African Americans who have received such an honor,” said Dr. Mark Hardy, Tennessee State University’s vice president for academic affairs.  “We are very excited to be one of the institutions to have been a part of the educational experience our Medal of Honor recipient, Lt. William McBryar, received many years ago.”

Lt Col Sharon Presley, Air Force ROTC Det 790 commander stationed at TSU, echoed Hardy’s sentiment.

Display honoring Lt. William McBryar in TSU library (Submitted photo)

“From the perspective of a military officer, to know of someone who achieved the nation’s highest honor, is awe-inspiring,” Presley said. “He was a soldier’s soldier.”

McBryar went on to serve with the 25th Infantry in the Spanish-American war and fought at El Caney, Cuba. He also saw action in the Philippine Insurrection before demobilizing in San Francisco.

In 1906, after leaving the military, McBryar moved to Greensboro, North Carolina as a civilian and there he married Sallie Waugh, a nurse. Three years later, he worked as a watchman at Arlington National Cemetery and as a military instructor at what is now Saint Paul’s College.

In 1933, with a desire to complete his degree, McBryar attended Tennessee A & I. He graduated the following year, finishing a college education that started at Saint Augustine’s University before he enlisted in the military.

McBryar went on to write for Tennessee State’s publication, “The Bulletin,” addressing issues related to social justice and developments in Germany.

McBryar is buried at Arlington National Cemetery. A Tennessee Historical marker honoring him will be unveiled at TSU early next year.

 

Department of Media Relations

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About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.