Category Archives: FACULTY

Japanese Delegation Holds Cultural, Economic and Political Discussion with Tennessee State University Students and Faculty

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A former Japanese ambassador to the United States says Tennessee State University students and faculty can benefit from cultural and academic experiences in Japan.

Ichiro Fujisaki, Former Ambassador of Japan to the United States (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Ichiro Fujisaki, who served as his country’s chief diplomatic officer to the U.S. from 2008-2012, is now the president of the America-Japan Society, Inc., a private entity for interactive activities between Japan and the U.S.

He spoke on TSU’s Avon Williams Campus Wednesday when he led a four-member panel on Japan’s culture, economy, politics and relationship with the U.S.

Called “Walk in U.S., Talk on Japan,” the panel is held in different cities across the United States each year. Audiences include students, faculty, grassroots organizations and community leaders in face-to-face discussion on understanding the culture and people of the world’s third-largest economic power.

The Consul-General of Japan in Nashville, Masami Kinefuchi, and more than 100 TSU students, faculty, administrators and community leaders attended the program, which concluded with a Q&A session and exchanges with the Japanese delegation.

Last year, 21 TSU students and faculty went to Japan for a 10-day visit funded by the Japanese government. (College of Business Photo)

“Japan today is very different from the Japan we see in prototypes and sketches in the media,” Fujisaki said. “Japan is really modernizing; it is a very open society. Japan is not just beautiful; it is so lively. And the good thing about it is that Japanese people are friendly to Americans, which makes it very appealing to students and visitors.”

According to organizers, “Walk in U.S., Talk on Japan” began in 2014. Since then, the delegation – usually comprising different individuals – has visited more than 63 cities.

The TSU visit was held in collaboration with the College of Business and the Office of International Affairs, and a result of a “special” relationship between TSU and the Japanese consulate since 2016, according to Anis Mnif, director of Graduate Programs in the COB.

That relationship, Mnif said, has resulted in many visits by TSU students and faculty, including one last year when 21 students went to Japan for a 10-day visit funded by the Japanese government.

Ronald McFarland, a graduate student in the MBA program, was one of those students. He said the experience was “unique” and very rewarding.

“A lot of what we know about Japan we only see on TV, but going there and seeing how clean the cities are, the friendliness of the people and their willingness to accept us in their culture was very eye-opening,” said McFarland, of Nashville. “The goal of the trip was to spread the word about the relationship between Nashville and TSU, in general, and Japan. As a TSU student just making the connections, meeting with business professionals, young professionals, opened my eyes to a whole new look on our global society.”

Dr. Millicent Lownes-Jackson, dean of the College of Business, said the Japanese delegation’s visit is “just another step along our long path that we have been on” in building a relationship with Japan.

“Our students have been studying abroad in Japan for a good number of years,” Lownes-Jackson said. “So this is just another step in building even stronger relationships. We think this will open the doors for more study abroad opportunities for our students, faculty, and for faculty from Japan to come and teach our students here in America.”

Also speaking at the program was Dr. John Robinson, professor of biological sciences and interim associate vice president for Academic Affairs, who brought greetings on behalf of President Glenda Glover.

Howard Gentry Jr., Criminal Court Clerk of Davidson County and TSU alum credited with helping to establish the relationship between TSU and the Japanese consulate, also attended the program.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Japanese Delegation to Hold Cultural, Economic and Political Awareness Discussion at TSU

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A four-member Japanese delegation will visit Tennessee State University on Wednesday, Jan. 24 for a panel discussion on Japan’s culture, economy, politics and relationship with the United States.

Called “Walk in U.S., Talk on Japan,” the panel is held in different cities across the United States each year. Audiences include students, faculty, grassroots organizations and community leaders in a face-to-face discussion on understanding the culture and people of the world’s third-largest economic power.

At TSU, former Japanese Ambassador to the United States, Ichiro Fujisaki, will lead the one-hour panel on the Avon Williams Campus.

The discussion will run from 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. It will include a Q&A session, free breakfast and opportunity for networking.

According to organizers, “Walk in U.S., Talk on Japan” began in 2014. Since then, the delegation – usually comprising different individuals – has visited more than 63 cities.

The TSU visit is being held in collaboration with the College of Business and the Office of International Affairs, and a result of a “special” relationship between TSU and the Japanese consulate since 2016, according to Anis Mnif, director of Graduate Programs in the COB.

He said as a result of the relationship, 24 TSU students went to Japan last year for a 10-day visit funded by the Japanese government.

“We believe this relationship and panel discussion are important for our students to gain new knowledge about Japan,” Mnif said. “It could lead to more visits, study abroad and internship opportunities with Japanese companies in the U.S.”

For more information or to RSVP, go to: Walk in U.S., Talk on Japan, or contact Tiffanie Harris at 615-963.7088, or the Information and Cultural Section at the Consulate-General of Japan in Nashville at 615.340.4300.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU joins in celebration of life, legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University joined the Interdenominational Ministers’ Fellowship and the Nashville community in celebrating the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

MLK march participants. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Hundreds of people assembled in front of Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church on Monday, Jan. 15, to march to TSU’s Gentry Complex for its annual Convocation honoring King.

Before the march, TSU President Glenda Glover thanked the youth, in particular, for coming out on a chilly day.

“I want to particularly give a shout out to the youth,” said Glover, “because you could have been doing something else today.”

She then went on to emphasize the importance of the occasion.

TSU President Glenda Glover. (photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

“I lived in Memphis and I was there when the assassination (of Dr. King) took place,” Glover said. “We need to make sure we keep this dream alive each and every year, each and every day.”

Nashville Mayor Megan Barry also lauded the youth for their attendance, and reminded them of the jobs and internships that are available to them in the community.

“I want all the youth who are in this gathering today to hear that we’ve got over 10,000 opportunities on our portal, and I need you guys to go there to find something that you want to do,” Barry said.

“We all know that the way to get people moving toward their future, is they’ve got to graduate from high school, and they’ve got to get that first job. And we’re committed to making sure that our youth can do just that.”

Miss TSU Kayla Smith said the march and Convocation are “great opportunities for the community to come together and keep the dream going that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. had.”

“This is a great event, and it touches my heart to be able to participate in it,” she said.

Taylor Williams, a freshman who is majoring in aeronautical industrial technology at TSU, echoed Smith’s sentiment. Williams added that even though there has been positive change since King’s death, there’s still much work to be done in the case of equality.

“History can repeat itself, so it’s very important for me to be a part of this,” said Williams, of Memphis.

Davidson County Juvenile Court Judge Sheila D.J. Calloway. (photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

Davidson County Juvenile Court Judge Sheila D.J. Calloway, the Convocation’s keynote speaker, continued the message of “investing in our youth.”

“When I think about the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. … it starts with our youth,” Calloway said before the Convocation. “And so I’ll be focusing today on how we can, as a community, support our youth through all of the difficulties that they’re having.”

During her speech, Calloway said early engagement in the lives of youth can deter them from trouble.

“Don’t wait till they are in my courtroom before trying to help them,” she said. “By then, it is way too late. Help them before they get to that point.”

Other Convocation participants included Dr. Glover, Mayor Barry, U.S. Congressman Jim Cooper, State Rep. Harold Love, Jr. and Dr. Shawn Joseph, director of Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools.

During the Convocation, the Interdenominational Ministers’ Fellowship renewed $1,000 scholarships for students at TSU, Fisk University, Meharry Medical College and American Baptist College.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU alumna Oprah Winfrey draws questions about possible run for president after moving Golden Globes speech

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – TSU alumna and media mogul Oprah Winfrey was the talk of the 2018 Golden Globes after her acceptance speech Sunday for the coveted Cecil B. DeMille Award.

TSU alumna Oprah Winfrey. (photo from shutterstock.com)

While receiving the lifetime achievement designation was groundbreaking for Winfrey as the first African American female, it was her remarks that had a lasting impact.

Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover had these comments on Winfrey’s trailblazing achievement.

“On the behalf of the Tennessee State University family, we congratulate Ms. Winfrey, a fellow alumna of our university, on receiving this prestigious award from the film and television industry,” said TSU President Glover.

“Ms. Winfrey is the epitome of grace, brilliance and strength, and delivered passionate remarks for a monumental occasion. She continues to inspire people of all ages by speaking to the very conscious of our nation. There is no question that her words resonated with Americans and those around the world.”

The star-filled audience seemed to hang on Winfrey’s every word as she addressed racism, sexism and the need for solidarity that should transcend Hollywood into mainstream America. Many in attendance and viewers alike immediately took to social media saying that she should make a run for the presidency in 2020.

All believed that Winfrey’s hopeful message – “A new day is on the horizon” – was her campaign-rallying cry.

Winfrey has not commented on the presidential speculation after her speech, but when her best friend Gayle King brought up the idea recently on “CBS This Morning,” Winfrey shot it down: “There will be no running for office of any kind for me.”

Winfrey received a degree in Mass Communication from TSU and has provided scholarships for students at her alma mater.

Currently, Winfrey serves as the CEO of the cable channel OWN, a network she created, a “special correspondent” for the CBS newsmagazine “60 Minutes” and an investor in companies like Weight Watchers.

Winfrey will appear in Ava DuVernay’s movie “A Wrinkle in Time” scheduled to be released in March.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU President Glenda Glover Discusses State of the University at Spring 2018 Faculty and Staff Institute

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover says improving retention, graduation and the overall success of students remain top priorities of the university.

Glover kicked off the 2018 spring semester with an address to the Faculty and Staff Institute.

She said the single objective of TSU is educating, graduating and “enhancing the lives of the students we touch.”

“Our one overriding objective is to meet the needs of all our students,” the president said.

Participants gather for the 2018 Spring Faculty and Staff Institute in Poag Auditorium. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

At the gathering in Poag Auditorium, Glover introduced Dr. Alisa L. Mosley as the interim vice president for Academic Affairs, replacing Dr. Mark Hardy who retired last semester. Faculty and staff also heard from Dr. Achintya Ray, chair of the Faculty Senate; and Staff Senate Chair Linda Goodman.

Glover reported that the university remains in full compliance with the governance standards of the Southern Association of Colleges and Universities, the accrediting agency, following a review. As a result of the FOCUS Act, which established a new governing board for the university, the SACS Commission on Colleges made a peer review team visit to ensure TSU was still in compliance with the commission’s governance standards.

“I am glad to report that the peer review team found TSU to be in compliance with all standards pertaining to the governance change,” Glover said.

A rendering of the 120,000-square-foot Tennessee State University Health Science Building. The building is in its design phase. (Courtesy photo)

On program accreditation, Glover reported that aeronautical industrial tech, occupational therapy, education, music and social work programs have all received re-accreditation as a result of 2016/2017 site visits by the respective accrediting agencies.

Glover also announced several new programs. They include an Executive Ph.D. in Higher Education Leadership, Ph.D. in Public Health, and B.S. in Nonprofit Management and Leadership, which are awaiting approval from the Tennessee Higher Education Commission. Master of Science in Engineering and Hospitality Management programs are also under consideration, she said.

Glover said the university was also reviewing low-producing programs, as well as enhancing focus on the undergraduate-nursing program.

“We want to make sure all programs are up to standard and relevant with the right amount of students. There is no need keeping programs that have low participation,” she said.

The president also discussed capital improvement and infrastructure enhancements. A new 120,000-square-foot  Health Sciences building is in the design phase, while two new residence halls are in the designer selection phase, she said.

“We lose students because of living conditions, so we want to make sure we have the facilities that will keep them here. Our campus is safe, overall campus crime is down and we are doing everything possible to make Tennessee State University the safest campus,” Glover said.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Getahn Ward Remembered For Excellence, Community Service and Dedication To Students

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Nashville’s most prominent journalists, as well as residents from Middle Tennessee, around the nation and the world, gathered in north Nashville Friday night to celebrate the life of journalist, professor and community leader Getahn Moses Ward.

Ward, who taught journalism as an adjunct professor at Tennessee State University, died Dec. 16 after a brief illness. He was 45 years old.

Varying emotions filled the high-spirited event as family members, coworkers and friends shared heartfelt testimonies in the crowded sanctuary of Born Again Church where Ward served as a deacon.

“He was a man of peace,” said Born Again Church Elder Jerome Brown.  “He was always busy, but he always did it from a place of peace.”

Described by Nashville Mayor Megan Barry as “the hardest-working reporter in Nashville,” Ward migrated from his native Liberia to Nashville in the early 90s, enrolling at TSU where he quickly rose to become editor-in-chief of the university’s student newspaper, The Meter.  He worked as a reporter with the Nashville Banner before it closed in 1997, and then served as a business reporter with The Tennessean beginning in 1998 until his death.

NewsChannel 5 weatherman and “Talk of the Town” co-host Lelan Statom said Ward’s passing is a reminder that “we need to celebrate life.”  Statom, who serves as the treasurer of the Nashville Chapter of the National Association of Black Journalists, worked for years alongside Ward, who served as the organization’s longtime parliamentarian.

“Just last month we asked him if he had an interest in being interim president,” said Statom.  “He politely declined on that because he knew where his passion was.  His passion wasn’t necessarily to be at the top of the chart for the organization.  It was to help students, which is something he did by serving as the chair of the scholarship committee for us.”

Since Ward’s death, TSU, The Tennessean, the Gannett Foundation and NABJ have partnered to create a scholarship in Ward’s name that will benefit aspiring journalists. The new scholarship is the first endowed scholarship in the history of the TSU Department of Communications. Organizers have already raised more than $30,000 with the goal of raising $50,000.

“It is a great way to honor the life of someone who gave back so much to the Nashville Community,” Statom said.

Individuals who would like to give to the scholarship fund should write a check to Tennessee State University, 3500 John A. Merritt Blvd., Nashville, TN, 37209-1561. Online donations can be made at bit.ly/getahnward.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Miss Tennessee State University Kayla Smith Participates in Ebony’s HBCU Campus Queens Competition

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Ebony magazine has begun its annual HBCU Campus Queens voting competition, and Miss TSU Kayla Smith wants to be among the Top 10 featured in Ebony’s April/May edition.

She wants your vote.

Smith is competing against more than 50 other hopefuls trying to make the Top 10 list. For Smith, becoming an Ebony Top 10 HBCU Campus Queen would fulfill a dream she has had since becoming Miss TSU.

“I believe in ‘black excellence,’“ she said. “That’s something I demonstrated when I  ‘broke the norm’ at predominantly white Germantown High School and became the first female African-American senior class president. At TSU I have maintained that, and certainly hope to demonstrate that as an Ebony Campus Queen.”

A native of Memphis, Smith is a senior health science major with a concentration in therapeutic studies and a minor in psychology. Her career goal is to become a successful occupational therapist with the goal of owning a rehabilitation center.

Since coming to TSU, Smith has been determined to fulfill the university’s motto of “THINK. WORK. SERVE,” by taking on roles that promote academic excellence and hard work. She is a former Miss Women of Infinite Potential, and the outgoing Miss Junior.

She is also a member of the Honors College, Golden Key International Honor Society, Pep Club, Pre-Alumni Council, HIP’Notyze Dance Troupe, and Princess Generation of Educated Men. In between classes, she welcomes college-bound students during campus tours to encourage the next generation to follow her lead.

Dr. Tracey Ford, TSU’s vice president for Student Affairs, said Smith is “definitely a perfect campus queen” because of the special qualities she has.

“Kayla Smith is an amazing young lady who has demonstrated leadership, scholarship and also a strong member of our community,” Ford said. “She relishes her role in being a role model to our students. Our institution is definitely better for having Kayla as our Miss TSU. Not only is she a beautiful person on the outside, she is an amazing spirit on the inside.”

Voting for the Campus Queen is in progress and ends on Jan. 15. The public can vote twice a day. To vote for Smith, visit http://bit.ly/2zZDaiQ.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU students to participate in MLK Joint Day of Service

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) –Tennessee State University will participate in several activities in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s holiday.

The university kicks off the weekend on Saturday, Jan. 13, by joining other area higher education institutions in a Day of Service.

In addition to performing service projects across Metro Nashville, TSU students will provide more than 10,000 meals for families in need. That project will take place in TSU’s Kean Hall at 1 p.m. Saturday.

“TSU is excited to join faculty and student volunteers … as we celebrate continuing the dream of Martin Luther King, Jr.,” said Shirley Nix-Davis, director of outreach for TSU’s Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement. “One of his greatest quotes is, ‘everybody can be great, because anybody can serve.’”

Last year, more than 300 TSU students participated in various MLK Day of Service projects around Nashville that included working with kids, assisting elderly residents, packing food and painting.

Linda Tynan, a resident at an independent living apartment complex in La Vergne, Tennessee, said she was grateful for the assistance students provided last year.

“I think it’s terrific to see these students lend a hand to people they don’t even know,” Tynan said. “I appreciated every minute of it.”

On Monday, Jan. 15, a symbolic march from Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church will highlight TSU’s MLK event, culminating with a program sponsored by the university, Interdenominational Ministries Fellowship and Hospital Corporation of America, or HCA. Among the hundreds of marchers will be TSU President Glenda Glover, State Rep. Harold Love, Jr., TSU students, and others from across the city.

For more information about TSU’s Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/servicelearning/

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU, faith community, city officials begin New Year with 6th Annual Presidential Prayer Service

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University and the Nashville faith-based community began the New Year with a morning of prayer during the 6th Annual Presidential Prayer Service on Wednesday.

Mayor Megan Barry. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

The service was held at Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church in Nashville, Tennessee. TSU President Glenda Glover was the keynote speaker.

“As we start another semester, another year at TSU, we start with prayer, with thanks,” Glover said. “I am truly thankful that God has blessed me to lead such a marvelous university. I thank you for your prayers, and for embracing and supporting TSU; and for supporting me as your president.”

Faith-based leaders of various denominations from across Metro Nashville participated on the program or were in attendance, including gospel legend and TSU alum Dr. Bobby Jones, and community activist and pastor Bishop Joseph Walker III.

Others in attendance were Nashville Mayor Megan Barry, as well as other city and state officials, including State Reps. Harold Love, Jr. and Brenda Gilmore, and Councilwoman Sharon Hurt.

“It is so wonderful to be here, because today we’re celebrating Dr. Glover, and also recognizing the incredible power that TSU has in our community,” said Mayor Barry. “You make Nashville better, stronger, more just, more equitable. And you are producing graduates every day that are ready to serve and lead, including several who are on my staff, and several who work in metro government.”

TSU honor students Chris Buford, II and Breanna Brown participate in prayer service. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Jefferson Street Church senior pastor Aaron Marble, who succeeds community activist James Thomas, said he’s glad to be collaborating with TSU and plans to continue the tradition.

“TSU has strong ties to the Nashville community, and so does Jefferson Street,” Marble says. “So uniting the university, the church and the community, is just awesome.”

The service was followed by a breakfast in the lower auditorium of the church that was open to the public.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Getahn Ward Memorial Scholarship created for journalism students at Tennessee State University

The Tennessean

The Tennessean, Tennessee State University and other organizations have partnered to create a new scholarship in the name of the late Getahn Ward that will benefit aspiring journalists at TSU.

The Getahn Ward Memorial Scholarship, announced Dec. 19, will be awarded to a journalism student each year who meets qualifications established by the school’s Department of Communications. Other partners include the National Association of Black Journalists and the Gannett Foundation.

Ward, a business reporter at the Tennessean since 1998, who was known for his real estate scoops, deep sources and bulldog approach, died on Dec. 9 after a brief illness. Ward, an active community leader, was also a longtime adjunct professor at TSU and a proud alum of the university. He was 45.

►More: Getahn Ward, longtime Tennessean reporter and community leader, dies at 45

Ward, who previously worked at the Nashville Banner before it closed in 1997, had a passion for teaching students and advocating for black journalists.

The new scholarship is the first endowed scholarship in the history of TSU’s Department of Communications.

“At a time when our majors are working multiple jobs to offset the cost of a college education, this will go a long way in helping some of our best and brightest students,” said Tameka Winston, who chairs the TSU Department of Communications.  “This scholarship represents a man who devoted much of his life to the field of journalism and to the education and success of students at Tennessee State University.”

The goal of organizers is to raise $25,000, which would be the minimum required to establish an annual scholarship in perpetuity.

The financial value of the scholarship will be determined by how much money is raised. If the goal of $25,000 is reached, the scholarship would be $1,000 per student annually. It would increase if more money is raised.

Winston said the department is also finalizing plans to honor Ward in a way that will give him “permanent recognition” within the department and university.

“He was one of the kindest individuals that I’ve ever met and the news of his passing is heartbreaking,” Winston said. “Getahn was a stellar professor and the department will never be able to replace him.”

►More: Getahn Ward: In honor of one of Nashville’s finest

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.