Category Archives: FACULTY

TSU celebrates history-making Homecoming with new constructions, record fundraising and parade attendance

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – This year’s Homecoming at Tennessee State University involved a bit of history-making, in addition to the excitement.

The Tigers’ trouncing of the Tennessee Tech Golden Eagles (41-14) in the football game at Nissan Stadium on Saturday was just the icing on the cake. Add that to the much-anticipated parade along Jefferson Street that brought out thousands, and groundbreaking ceremonies for four new buildings, as well as a scholarship gala the night before that raised a record amount to keep students in school.

President Glenda Glover waves to the crowd along the 2018 Homecoming parade route. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The Scholarship Gala is the university’s single largest fundraising event. Organizers said when all the tabulation is completed, they expect this year’s proceeds to top last year’s $1.3 million intake.

No doubt, TSU President Glenda Glover called this year’s Homecoming one of the most exciting in school history.

“We are on record pace here,” Glover said to a packed room of cheering fans at the President’s Homecoming Reception at Nissan Stadium, just before the football game.

“We broke ground for four new buildings this week, including two new residence halls that will

The world-renowned TSU Aristocrat of Bands participates in the Homecoming parade. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

help us to recruit more quality students. We are just very excited.”

The new structures include two new residence halls, a Health Sciences Building and an Alumni Welcome Center. The new dorms will be the first to be built at the university in 23 years, and the Health Sciences Building will be the first state-funded building to be constructed on the campus in 15 years.

Glover also touted the record number of participants in the 2018 Homecoming parade.

“We had 140 entrants in this year’s parade, that’s the largest ever. It is really good to see the Nashville community come out in such numbers to support TSU,” she said.

Mr. TSU and Miss TSU and their Court wave to the cheering crowd from atop their Homecoming float in the 2018 parade along Jefferson Street. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

At the reception, Glover recognized and congratulated several individuals, including Special Presidential Honoree James Shaw, Jr., the “Waffle House Hero”; the parade grand marshals, and the Homecoming honorees. She also recognized and thanked TSU alums Amos and Brenda Otis for their “generous contribution” of $1million toward the construction of the new Alumni Welcome Center.

She paid special tribute to the family of injured TSU football player Christion Abercrombie for their courage. The family, including Abercrombie’s aunt, Shawn Neason, and uncle Kevin Richardson – sporting the player’s No. 6 jersey – later joined President Glover for the coin toss at the start of the game. Also present at the reception was Abercrombie’s other uncle, Obie Mitchell, and Chris Wyckoff, a family friend.

TSU President Glenda Glover, along with senior administration and Foundation Board members, receive a check for $1 million from TSU alums Amos and Brenda Otis toward the construction of an Alumni Welcome Center on campus. Picture from left are: President Glover, Amos Otis, Brenda Otis, Dwaye Tucker, Foundation Board chair; Dr. Lesia Crunpton-Young, VP for Research and Institutional Advancement; Joni McReynolds, President of the TSU National Alumni Association; Cassandra Griggs, Alumni Affairs director; and Dr. Curtis Johnson, Chief of Staff. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Like Glover said, excitement about homecoming was widespread and rekindled a lot of memories.  Nathan Andrews was all smiles as he stood in front of what is now Humphries Hall and pointed to the parking lot on the other side – soon to be the home of the Alumni Welcome Center.

“That was a baseball field, where we passed the time in the evening,” said Andrews, of Nashville, who came to TSU in 1959. “And where I am standing was a little beer joint. We couldn’t go to many places so some of us would sneak around here.”

Injured TSU football player Christion Abercrombie’s family member accompany President Glover for the coin toss at the start of the Homecoming game at Nissan Stadium. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Andrews said although he is not active as he should be, he watches the parade every year if his health allows, and sits at his favorite spot – “across from the baseball field.”

Colette Combs, of Miami, Florida, a 1976 TSU graduate, looks forward to always coming back to where she called her beginning.

“Homecoming is filled with exciting moments of rekindling and renewing old friendships,” said Combs, who this year celebrated her 45th anniversary as a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. “This is a time when we celebrate and reminisce on precious memories formulated here at Tennessee State University.”

A group of TSU alums, attending the Homecoming parade, celebrated their 45th anniversary as members of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority. Several members of the class are not in the picture. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

From Oct. 14-20, Homecoming events included the Robert N. Murrell Oratorical Contest, a gospel concert, the Mr. TSU and Miss TSU coronation, the Homecoming Concert, the Alumni Whiteout Party, the Charles Campbell Fish Fry, the President’s Legacy Society Luncheon, and the Breakfast of Champions, among others.

Also this year, the university launched the Dr. Levi Watkins, Jr. Symposium in honor of the late TSU alum and pioneering heart surgeon. The Watkins family, who attended the inaugural symposium, received rousing applause from the audience and President Glover for contributing $500,000 to establish the Levi Watkins, Jr. Endowed Scholarship at TSU.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Agriculture and Home Economic Hall of Fame welcomes new inductees

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The dean of Tennessee State University’s College of Agriculture was among the three individuals inducted into the Ag and Home Economics Hall of Fame Thursday night.

Dr. Chandra Reddy was inducted along with Mr. Will Nesby, retired USDA program manager; and Mr. J.W. McGuire, retired county director, cooperative extension service. A ceremony was held at the Sheraton Music City Hotel.

The TSU Agriculture and Home Economics Hall of Fame was established in 1996 to recognize and honor those persons who have been diligent in their zeal to enhance the quality of life for residents of Tennessee and abroad, and to assist students in attending TSU and majoring in areas of Agriculture and Human Sciences.

TSU President Glenda Glover congratulated the new inductees, and thanked alumni and others in attendance for all their support.

“It’s good to see each of you here tonight, as we pay tribute to those who have made TSU outstanding.,” Glover said. “To our alumni, faculty, staff, students, thank you for being an ambassador of good will for our institution.”

TSU’s Homecoming activities continued Friday with the Charles Campbell Fish Fry, Student Pep Rally, and Greek Step Show.

On Friday evening, TSU planned a stellar Scholarship Gala at the Music City Center. This year, the Gala welcomes back comedian Jonathan Slocumb as the master of ceremony. Special entertainment will be provided by legendary jazz artist Roy Ayers. Proceeds from ticket sales and sponsorships are used to provide financial assistance to students.

Homecoming will conclude Oct. 20 with the Homecoming Parade from 14th and Jefferson Street to 33rd and John Merritt Boulevard, and the big football matchup between the Tigers and the Golden Eagles of Tennessee Tech at Nissan Stadium.

For more information about Homecoming activities, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/alumni/homecoming/

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Mr. And Miss Tennessee State University Coronation Continues Homecoming Tradition

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University continued a Homecoming tradition with the crowning of a new Mr. and Miss TSU.

Hundreds of people — including parents, relatives, friends and fellow students — packed a jubilant Kean Hall on Oct. 17 to witness the coronation of Darian McGhee and Kayla Sampson, and their court.

TSU President Glenda Glover congratulated the new king and queen after giving them the oath of office. Dr. Tracey Ford, vice president for Student Affairs, followed the president. She charged the two students to take their roles seriously.

TSU President Glenda Glover congratulates Darian McGhee and Kayla Sampson after being crowned as the new Mr. and Miss Tennessee State University. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“Taking on the responsibility of Mr. TSU and Miss TSU is steeped in tradition, as many are looking up to you,” Ford said. “Be reminded that this is serious.”

McGhee, a senior electrical engineering major from Memphis, Tennessee, is the outgoing Mr. Junior. He said in an interview before the coronation that his goal is to help more male students succeed in college. Compared to females, McGhee said, male students are disproportionately not successful in college because many lack the zeal and desire to persevere “when things get tough.”

“When I go to bed each night and wake up the next morning, I want to feel I am a better person than I was the day before; that comes from my drive to be better,” said McGhee, of Memphis Tennessee. “You have to have a drive and that’s what I want to pass on to my fellow students.”

Sampson, who becomes the 89th Miss TSU, is from Jackson, Mississippi. She is a senior agriculture science major with a concentration in biotechnology. Her goal is to use her “unique position” to implement a platform built around community service, especially reaching out to young kids, and helping incoming freshmen get adjusted to college life.

“The TSU motto of Think, Work, Serve is built around service and I want to make sure we carry out that mission in our community by participating in activities in elementary schools,” Sampson said. “My goal is to inspire more little kids through mentoring or helping in their schools. They respond more to young people. If they see us looking well and setting good examples, they will want to be like us”

The new Mr. and Miss TSU Court include: Christian Shack, Mr. Freshman; Tyahna Arnold, Miss Freshman; Donovan Stewart, Mr. Sophomore; Joycelyn Barney, Miss Sophomore; Damyr Moore, Mr. Junior; Deirdre Johnson, Miss Junior; Devinn Pauley, Mr. Senior; Arnella Williams-Foster, Miss Senior; Nadia Butterfield, Miss 1912; and Wimberly Robinson, Miss Blue & White.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Groundbreakings for construction projects highlight TSU Homecoming, provide boost for recruitment

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University has unveiled major construction projects that will change the institution’s footprint forever.

The new construction includes two new residence halls at an estimated cost of $75.3 million and a $38.8 million Health Sciences Building.

Tennessee State broke ground for all three as a part of Homecoming activities last week. TSU President Glenda Glover believes the new residence halls and academic building will play a major role in recruitment efforts.

“The university is undergoing a renaissance of sorts; it began with our new, higher admission standards, and continues with the new construction of the residence halls and Health Sciences Building for prospective students to enjoy and reap the benefits,” said President Glover.

“We are proud of our legacy and the current buildings on campus are a part of that legacy, but the construction projects are the first on our campus in 23 years. These are exciting times for the university and our partners.”

TSU broke ground on Oct. 18 for the state-of-the-art Health Sciences Building and an Alumni Welcome Center.

Rendering of new Health Sciences Building.

The day before, there was a groundbreaking for the two new residence halls, the first ones to be built on the campus in 23 years. The new Health Sciences Building will be the first state-funded building built on the campus in 15 years.

Later that Thursday was the groundbreaking for the Alumni Welcome Center, which is the first privately funded building gifted to the University, as well as the first building to be funded by alumni. Earlier this year, alums Amos and Brenda Otis made a commitment to build the center.

“It is a privilege and a pleasure to be able to do something for the university that pulled me out of the streets of Detroit and gave me an education and an opportunity to be a productive citizen,” said Amos Otis.

Faculty and staff, as well as state and local officials, have turned out for the groundbreakings. Thursday’s event for the Health Sciences Building drew media from just about all the local outlets.

All the construction projects are expected to be completed by 2020.

“Today is a wonderful day,“ Glover said at the Health Sciences’ event. “We break this ground for student success. We break this ground in support of our mission to educate students at the highest level who attend Tennessee State University.”

Currently, TSU’s College of Health Sciences has eight departments and more than 12 programs spread across five buildings on campus.

“With this new building, a number of these programs will come together at this location, to continue the excellent work they’re currently doing in teaching, research and service,” said Dr. Ronald Barredo, interim dean for the College of Health Sciences.

Groundbreaking for new residence halls on Wednesday. (Photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

State Rep. Brenda Gilmore, a TSU alumna, shared similar sentiment about the $38.8 million facility.

“This future building will one day host some of the best and brightest minds in the world,” Gilmore said. “In so many ways, this event does not only mark a new adventure, but reaffirms the longstanding commitment that Tennessee State has to excellence and innovation in higher education.”

TSU sophomore Jailen Leavell said the new Health Sciences Building is great news, as well as the other planned construction on the campus.

“For the students, this is big,” Leavell said. “We’re developing tomorrow’s leaders.”

At the groundbreaking for the new dorms, State Rep. Harold Love, Jr., lauded Dr. Glover and “all those involved in the intricacies of getting this done.”

“Residence halls represent a university’s commitment to student success just as much as other educational buildings,” said Love, also a TSU alum. “Tennessee State continues to invest in facilities to increase the opportunities for students to find a home away from home.”

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU football player Christion Abercrombie transferred to rehab center, continuing to improve

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University football player Christion Abercrombie has been transferred to a rehabilitation center in Atlanta.

According to a release from the Shepherd Center, the 20-year-old student-athlete was moved from Vanderbilt University Medical Center on Oct. 17. Before the move, he was upgraded from critical to stable condition.

Christion sustained a brain injury during Tennessee State’s football game with Vanderbilt University on Sept. 29.

He was admitted to Shepherd Center’s Intensive Care Unit for evaluation, care and observation.

“Soon, he will move into the hospital’s Brain Injury Rehabilitation Program, where he will begin therapy under the guidance of a full team of medical and rehabilitation specialists,” according to the Center.

The facility specializes in medical treatment, research and rehabilitation for people with spinal cord injury or brain injury. Founded in 1975, Shepherd Center is a private, not-for-profit hospital and is ranked by U.S. News & World Report among the top 10 rehabilitation hospitals in the nation.

Staci Abercrombie, Christion’s mother, said at a press conference on Oct. 3 that she was optimistic about her son’s recovery because of her faith, and she reiterated that sentiment in a recent statement.

“We truly appreciate all of the love, support and prayers from everyone,” she said. “This has given the family the strength needed to be able to care for Christion. This injury was not expected, but God has prepared us and will continue to provide us with his healing power. We know that it’s a miracle that our son is here today. Please continue to pray for Christion’s full recovery.”

TSU President Glenda Glover said Christion’s improving health is “an example of what the power of prayer can do.”

“The TSU Family is extremely happy to hear that football player Christion Abercrombie is continuing to improve,” Glover said. “The news couldn’t have come at a better time than during our homecoming week. The entire TSU Family has had Christion on our minds throughout the entire planning process of the last few weeks. Again, this is great news. We ask that everyone keep praying for Christion, and his family, as he moves to the next phase of care and ultimately makes a full recovery.”

Prayer for Christion has been ongoing. Shortly after the incident, the TSU family held a prayer vigil for him, and the university’s National Alumni Association called for a special day of prayer

A GoFundMe has been set up to help Christion and his family. To donate, visit www.gofundme.com/tennessee-state-univ-athletics-dept.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU breaks ground for first new residence halls in 23 years

TSU breaks ground for first new residence halls in 23 years

 NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – TSU President Glenda Glover helped break ground Wednesday for two new co-educational residence halls, the first of three groundbreakings taking place during Homecoming week.

TSU President Glenda Glover unveils information about new residence halls. (Photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

Wednesday’s groundbreaking, the first for a new residence hall at TSU since 1995, took place on the lawn of the Strange Performing Arts Building. The groundbreaking for a Health Sciences Building is scheduled for 10 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 18, in the Hankal Hall Courtyard. And the groundbreaking for an Alumni Welcome Center will take place around 1:30 p.m. at the corner of 31st and John Merritt Blvd.

Construction of the residence halls was initially announced last fall after the State Building Commission approved construction of the $75.3 million project.

“We break ground this morning for student residence life,” said Glover at a ceremony before the groundbreaking. “We break this ground for student success. And we break this ground because it is altogether fitting and proper for upgrading student life on the campus of Tennessee State University.”

Dr. Tracy Ford, vice president of student affairs at TSU, said the groundbreaking for the residence halls and the other planned construction is indeed “reason to celebrate.”

“Today doesn’t just mark the groundbreaking of a physical structure, but it shines a light on the amazing future of TSU, and represents one of the many exciting and strategic changes to come,” Ford said.

Student trustee Braxton Simpson speaks at ceremony before groundbreaking. (Photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

Braxton Simpson, student representative on the TSU Board of Trustees, expressed similar sentiment.

“This is a very exciting moment for all of the students here at Tennessee State University,” she said.

Besides TSU’s faculty and staff, Wednesday’s groundbreaking was also attended by local and state officials.

“This is a wonderful day,” said State Sen. Thelma Harper. “TSU is No. 1!”

State Rep. Harold Love, Jr., a TSU graduate, lauded Dr. Glover and “all those involved in the intricacies of getting this done.”

“Residence halls represent a university’s commitment to student success just as much as other educational buildings,” Love said. “Tennessee State continues to invest in facilities to increase the opportunities for students to find a home away from home.”

For more information about the other groundbreakings and Homecoming activities, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/alumni/homecoming/

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Remembers Founders During 2018 Homecoming

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – This is Homecoming week and today is Founders’ Day at Tennessee State University.

TSU President Glenda Glover, accompanied by keynote speaker Council Woman-At-Large Sharon Hurt, led a procession of faculty, student leaders and administrators in Kean Hall to mark the university’s 106th birthday.

President Glenda Glover presents 2018 Founders’ Day speaker Sharon Hurt with a plaque at the ceremony in Kean Hall. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The University Wind Ensemble, led by Dr. Reginald McDonald, offered selections to a cheering audience, following presentation of colors by the Air Force ROTC Color Guard.

“This is a great day for Tennessee State University,” Glover said, as she recounted events in the University’s history from its founding in 1912 to the role it plays today as a major center of education in the nation.

“From 1912 when the then-Agricultural and Industrial Normal School for Negroes, built to provide educational opportunity for blacks, opened its doors to the first 247 students, TSU has maintained a tradition of excellence in education for a diverse population.”

Student leaders and faculty join in singing the Alma Mater at the Founders’ Day program. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

In her keynote address, Rep. Hurt, president and CEO of Jefferson Street United Merchant Partnership, or JUMP, reminded the students, faculty and alumni that as members of the TSU family, they have a “rich legacy” to uphold of people who believe in self-determination.

“As you celebrate Founders’ Day, remember that you have an ancestral calling to serve and support this institution,” said Hurt, a graduate of TSU. Hurt also holds a master’s degree in non-profit leadership from Belmont University.

Miss TSU Kayla Sampson, joined by Mr. TSU Darian McGhee, gives the university history at the Founders’ Day program. (Phto by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“You are the keepers of a legacy of worldwide accomplishments and have the God-given right by virtue of your calling to glorify, magnify and fortify the legacy that you have inherited as a descendant of doctors, teachers, engineers, talk show host, etc.,” she said. “Whatever your profession, TSU gave you a purpose.”

Hurt, a recipient of several awards and recognitions, is a former board member of the Center for Non-Profit Management and past president of the Association of Non-Profit Executives Council, and is a graduate of the 2004 Class of Leadership Nashville. During her tenure as president of JUMP, Hurt has secured more than $4 million in funding from the Neighborhood Stabilization Program Grant to acquire and rehabilitate homes in the North Nashville community.

She thanked President Glover, also an alumna, for the invitation and for her own legacy of excellence in earning multiple degrees. She called on students to be more focused, and congratulated the university on the celebration of the 2018 Homecoming.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU football player continuing to recover, headed to rehab

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University football student-athlete Christion Abercrombie is scheduled to be discharged from Vanderbilt University Medical Center on Wednesday and transported to a rehabilitation center in Atlanta, according to TSU Athletic officials.

The Athletics Department said Tuesday that Abercrombie, who sustained a head injury in the TSU-Vanderbilt football game on Sept. 29, will be taken to the Shepherd Center, which is one of the nation’s top 10 rehabilitation hospitals for brain injuries.

Staci Abercrombie, Christion’s mother, said at a press conference on Oct. 3 that she was optimistic about her son’s recovery because of her faith, and she’s asking for continued prayer.

“We thank everyone for their love, support and prayers,” she said in a statement. “Keep praying.”

TSU President Glenda Glover said Christion’s improving health is “an example of what the power of prayer can do.”

“The TSU Family is extremely happy to hear that football player Christion Abercrombie is continuing to improve,” she said. “The news couldn’t have come at a better time than during our homecoming week. The entire TSU Family has had Christion on our minds throughout the entire planning process of the last few weeks. Again, this is great news. We ask that everyone keep praying for Christion, and his family, as he moves to the next phase of care and ultimately makes a full recovery.”

TSU head football coach Rod Reed expressed similar sentiment.

“This is, in my opinion, a miracle that he’s being discharged after such a traumatic experience,” he said. “We’re looking forward to a speedy recovery.”

Prayer for Christion has been ongoing. Shortly after the injury, the TSU family held a prayer vigil for him, and the university’s National Alumni Association called for a special day of prayer

A GoFundMe has been set up to help Christion and his family. To donate, visit www.gofundme.com/tennessee-state-univ-athletics-dept.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU Scholarship Gala Features Legendary Jazz Musician Roy Ayers

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s Scholarship Gala will take place on Friday, Oct. 19, at the Music City Center.

The event, which begins at 7 p.m., will be preceded by a 6 p.m. reception featuring the TSU Jazz Collegians and the TSU String Orchestra. Nationally renowned actor and comedian Jonathan Slocumb will host the annual fundraising event, which will conclude with a concert featuring legendary jazz artist Roy Ayers.

“The Homecoming Scholarship Gala serves as Tennessee State University’s signature fundraising event,” Gala chairs Cassandra Griggs and Iris Ramey said in a statement. “It provides an opportunity for the university to partner with alumni, friends, employees, corporations and organizations to raise annual and endowed scholarship dollars for the outstanding students at TSU.”

The gala provides critical funds necessary to meet the significant need for student scholarships and ensures access to the relevant academic programs required to successfully educate and prepare students for the global marketplace.

This year, the gala will recognize a “stellar group” of honorees and grand marshals, including ‘Waffle House Hero’ James Shaw, Jr., who received national acclaim after he disarmed a Waffle House shooter in April. Shaw will receive a Special Presidential Recognition.

Other honorees are: Dr. Calvin Atchison, retired vice president of Development/Foundation; Dorothy Lockridge, retired vice president of Student Affairs; and Coach James Bass, retired health professor and swimming coach.

The grand marshals are: Robert Covington, NBA player with the Philadelphia 76ers; Dr. Richard Lewis, member of TSU Board of Trustees and owner of Lewis & Wright Funeral Directors; and Delorse Lewis, former executive director of TSU Development/Foundation.

For more information about the gala and how to donate, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/gala/.

To find out more about TSU’s overall Homecoming this year, https://bit.ly/2wYtjJG.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Nashville Public Library to host screening of documentary about legendary track coach Ed Temple and the Tigerbelles

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The city’s main library is hosting a screening of the documentary, “Mr. Temple and the Tigerbelles,” on Thursday, Oct. 18.

The screening at the Nashville Public Library at 615 Church Street is from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. and is free and open to the public. Screenings will also be held at Middle Tennessee State University and Vanderbilt University on Oct. 18.

Tennessee State University hosted the first screening of the documentary earlier this year. TSU President Glenda Glover said the documentary is an “extremely proud moment.”

“Whenever I talk with individuals about Coach Temple, I also remind them that he was a great educator as well, ensuring that all Tigerbelles earned their degrees as top student athletes,” Dr. Glover said. “The members of the Temple Documentary Fund and the filmmakers did an amazing job of documenting the remarkable accomplishments of the Tigerbelles under the leadership of Coach Temple.”

Temple was an internationally known track and field icon. He coached the TSU Tigerbelles for more than 40 years and the U.S. Women’s Track and Field team at the 1960 and 1964 Olympic Games. During that time, he produced 41 Olympians who won 23 medals, 13 of them gold. Temple passed away Sept, 22, 2016, at the age of 89. He belongs to nine different halls of fame and is one of three coaches inducted into the United States Olympic Hall of Fame.

The 40-minute documentary covers Temple and the Tigerbelles’ success during a time when the nation was embroiled in a civil rights crisis as African Americans sought equality. The film also features testimonials from historians, writers and former Tigerbelles.

Filmmaker Tom Neff, who wrote and directed the documentary, will lead a brief panel after the screening at the library.

Wyomia Tyus, a former Tigerbelle and the first person to win a gold medal for the same event in consecutive Olympics (1964 and 1968), will sign her book at the event.

 

Department of Media Relations

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About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.