Category Archives: FACULTY

TSU Board of Trustees holds first meeting

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s Board of Trustees held its first meeting since being confirmed by State lawmakers.

The meeting, organizational in nature, was held Thursday, April 13, on the main campus in Hankal Hall, and was open to the public.

TSU President Glenda Glover provided opening remarks and welcomed the new trustees along with Governor Bill Haslam and members of the Tennessee Higher Education Commission (THEC).

“This is an exciting time for the TSU family as we begin this new phase in the life of the University,” said President Glover. “On behalf of all of our stakeholders, we thank this esteemed group of individuals for their commitment and dedication to serve as trustees of our institution.”

Action items included selecting the board leadership and the student trustee. Dr. Joseph W. Walker III, pastor of Mt. Zion Baptist Church of Nashville and presiding Bishop of the Full Gospel Baptist Church Fellowship, International, was selected as chair and corporate executive Dr. Deborah A. Cole as vice chair. Cole is president and CEO of Citizens Savings Bank and Trust Company in Nashville. Nashville native Sydnie Davis was appointed as the student trustee to round out the mandated 10-member board.

TSU’s board is part of the governor’s Focus on College and University Success (FOCUS) Act, which requires the state’s six public four-year universities to be governed by local boards.

“This is an historic day for Tennessee State University and is something that we as a state have talked about and thought about for a long time,” said Governor Bill Haslam. “The TSU Board of Trustees is a group of highly accomplished individuals who are completely focused on the perspectives of the students, faculty and alumni and are committed to moving the university forward,” Haslam added.

Members also adopted bylaws and formed the following committees: executive, audit, academic affairs and student affairs, and finance and budget.

The board meeting’s agenda and materials are posted as they are available at http://www.tnstate.edu/board/meetings.aspx. To see bios of the board members, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/board/trustees.aspx.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU children’s day event attracts more than 250 kids

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – More than 250 kids converged on Tennessee State University’s indoor practice facility to participate in activities leading up to the Week of the Young Child.

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Four-year-old Gavin Winfrey listens to TSU nursing student Megan Tomlin talk about cleanliness. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Three to 5-year-olds from several local schools and day cares participated in the April 12 event hosted by TSU’s Department of Family and Consumer Sciences and the Center for Learning Sciences.

Each April, the National Association for the Education of Young Children designates a week to focus on children. This year April 24-28 is designated.

Dr. Margaret Machara, who is in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, was the coordinator of TSU’s event, which involved participation from 16 of the university’s departments.

She said students and faculty in each department were asked to develop activities for the children related to their respective areas of study. Organizers said the event provided a learning experience for both kids and college students, particularly those in a program like early childhood.

“The little kids are learning, but the big kids are learning too,” Machara said.

Stacey Nieman, program manager of the Tennessee Early Childhood Training Alliance at TSU, agreed.

“The older students at TSU, what we’re getting them to see is being part of the community, and reaching out to the schools, preschools that are in our neighborhood,” Nieman said. “And the children, we just want them to get a feel of the university. It’s great if we can make an impression at an early age.”

She said research shows that most of the brain’s development happens when children are under the age of 8.

“So, those children in the ages of 3 to 5, it’s a primary time to have optimal brain development, and that’s done through experiences,” like the event here at TSU, she said.

Activities included a tractor simulator that allowed kids to virtually experience harvesting and baling hay, and exercising with some of the physical therapy students.

The kids also learned about safety and health care, such as making sure they always wash their hands.

“We’re teaching kids how to cover their cough, and how to wash their hands,” said nursing student Megan Tomlin, who will be graduating in May from TSU’s BSN program. “It really helps in preventing illness.”

Parents at the event were given a booklet on activities they can do to help their children continue to learn.

Natasha Winfrey attended with her four-year-old son, Gavin. She believes the activities made a positive impression on the kids.

“I think it’s good to get the kids started early, to see all the specialties that are available to them when they get older,” she said.

As he was leaving, Gavin was a little more succinct about his visit.

“I had fun!”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

TSU Student Government Association Announces New Officers for 2017/2018 Academic Year

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University‘s Student Government Association has a new group of officers for the 2017/2018 academic year.

The new student leadership, including a Mr. TSU and a Miss TSU, was announced by the Student Election Commission Friday, April 7, during a ceremony in the university’s Amphitheater.

TSU Campus
President Glenda Glover and reigning Miss TSU Alicia Jones, right, congratulate incoming Miss TSU Kayla Smith. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

TSU President Glenda Glover, along with staff from the Office of Student Affairs, was on hand to congratulate the new officers when the election results were announced.

JerMilton Woods, of Memphis, a rising senior majoring in Performance and Sports Sciences, was elected the new SGA president, while Justus Watson, a senior Agricultural Science major from Atlanta, is the new SGA vice president.

Memphis native Kayla Smith, a rising senior Health Sciences major, is Miss. TSU. Alec Forrest, as the new Mr. TSU, will escort her. Forrest is a senior accounting major from Jackson, Tennessee.

“We are excited about the potential for these new student leaders and the impact they will be making on the student body,” said Alex Atkinson, assistant dean of Student Engagement and Life.

Following is the list of the new Miss TSU court and other members of the SGA. 

Mr. Senior – Andrew Crawford from Nashville – a rising senior Health Science major

Mrs. Senior – Daniellle Perry from Stone Mountain, Georgia – a rising senior, Child Development major

Senior Class President – Marquis Austin from Cincinnati, Ohio – a rising senior Business Administration major

Junior Class President – Prudencio Logan from Stone Mountain, Georgia – a rising junior Mass Communication major

Junior Class Secretary – Elyse Long from Harrison Township, Michigan – a rising sophomore Biology: Pre-Med major

Mr. Junior – Darien McGhee from Memphis, Tennessee – a rising Junior Mechanical Engineering major

Miss. Junior – Brandi BeCoats from Brentwood, Tennessee – a rising Junior Health Science major

Sophomore Class President – Makayla McCree from Detroit, Michigan – a rising sophomore Political Science major

Sophomore Class Vice President – Donald Thompson from Cincinnati, Ohio – a rising sophomore Finance and Economics major

Sophomore Class Treasurer – Ryan Smith from Atlanta, Georgia – a rising sophomore Economics and Finance major

Mr. Sophomore – Jonathon Hammock from Anderson, Indiana – a rising sophomore Finance major

Miss Sophomore – Sierra Holmes from Orlando, Florida – a rising sophomore Fashion Merchandising major

Representative At Large

  1. Shelby Davis from Waldorf, Maryland – a rising sophomore Biology: Pre-Med major
  1. Denisha Adewole from Nashville – a rising senior Biology major
  1. Sunnisha Stephenson from St. Thomas, United States Virgin Islands – a rising Junior Criminal Justice major.
  1. Darren Evans from St. Thomas, United States Virgin Islands – a rising Junior Civil Engineering major
    Department of Media RelationsTennessee State University
    3500 John Merritt Boulevard
    Nashville, Tennessee 37209
    615.963.5331About Tennessee State UniversityWith more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Nearly 800 Students, Parents Attend 2017 Spring Preview Day at Tennessee State University

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Spring Preview Day 2017 at Tennessee State University was a huge success.

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A TSU staffer talks to visiting parents and students about admission opportunities at the university. (Submitted photo)

The Office of Admissions and Recruitment organized the one-day event on Saturday, April 8, to give high school juniors and seniors from across the nation an opportunity to see the campus during springtime, as well as acquaint them with the university’s offerings and admission processes.

Nearly 800 students, parents and family members from 15 states — including Michigan, Texas, Wisconsin, Illinois, Missouri and Indiana — attended Spring Preview Day.

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Hundreds of parents and students attending Spring Preview Day also toured the campus and met with academic departments. (Submitted photo)

TSU President Glenda Glover, accompanied by recruitment staff, welcomed the visitors in Kean Hall, where the various colleges and academic departments set up tents and tables displaying materials from their various departments.

According to organizers, visitors later toured the campus, met with academic departments, and received informational materials.

“We had high expectations for Spring Preview 2017 and we were not disappointed,” said Everett D. Jolley, director of recruitment. “It was a busy day for the admissions staff and representatives from the colleges. Several students who had turned in all their information were admitted on the spot.”

Jolley said Spring Preview was started several years ago as a “junior preview day,” to give juniors a jumpstart on recruitment, but it has “slowly turned into a day for seniors as well to complete their admission requirement.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Multimillionaire Entrepreneur Lectures TSU Students on Success, Establishes Endowed Scholarship

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Multimillionaire entrepreneur Dr. Bill Pickard has a message for TSU students: “Anybody, from anywhere, can accomplish anything.”

“But to do so, ‘you gotta put the work in,’” Pickard said, quoting a line from Grammy-Award winning singer Drake.

Pickard, chairman of Global Automotive Alliance and co-managing partner of MGM Grand Detroit Casino, was the guest lecturer at the Distinguished Lecture Series in the Forum on Monday, April 10.

Following his lecture, the LaGrange, Georgia, native, who is also CEO of Bearwood Management Company and co-owner of five Black-owned newspapers, established an endowed scholarship in the name of Kevin Williams, a TSU alumnus, Foundation Board member and retired president of General Motors of Canada.

He said the endowment was in appreciation of a long friendship, and credited Williams with helping to expand his (Pickard) GAA conglomerate of logistics and manufacturing companies with more than $1.5 billion in sales.

“When I met Kevin we were doing about $100 million, and when he left, we were doing about half a billion, that’s relationship,” Pickard told the packed auditorium with mostly students from the College of Business.

On his own life story, Pickard, who earned a Ph.D. from The Ohio State University, said he started off at a community college after high school, because of poor grades. Many did not give him much chance for success, he said.

“I completed college, earned a master’s degree, became a social worker, and life was good,” said Pickard, who credits a “strong” faith in God for his success “I had an opportunity to earn my Ph.D. and I did.”

According to his bio, Pickard’s entrepreneurial career began with a McDonald’s franchisee in Detroit, becoming one of the top-10 Blacks in America to have a McDonald’s franchise.

“It is not where you start but where you go,” said Pickard, reminding the students of his “Seven Proven Principles of Entrepreneurship,” outlined in his book Millionaire Moves – vision, opportunity, finance, relationships, talent and skillset, failure, faith.

“To be successful you must have vision. Your vision must be greater than the window you are looking through. What that means is that you will never be what you cannot see,” Pickard said.

Williams, in whose name Pickard established the scholarship endowment, said he is glad many will benefit from Pickard’s gift.

“This recognition goes to a lot of people beyond myself,” he said, as he recognized his wife, Arlene, who “makes the machine go.”

Maya Moore, a junior finance major, was part of a panel of Business College students who listened to Pickard. She was very impressed by the speaker’s very simple and encouraging presentation.

“I encourage students to read his book, because just as he spoke, the book lays it down in layman terms for our generation to understand,” Moore said. “Like he said, if you put the work in, with a clear vision, you can accomplish anything.”

Earlier, Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, vice president for Research and Institutional Advancement, welcomed Pickard on behalf of President Glenda Glover, who was traveling on business.

“President Glover and the entire TSU family are glad and honored to welcome Dr. Pickard.” Crumpton-Young said. “Certainly, we are excited to hear him and learn from his great wealth of knowledge.”

The Dean of the College of Business, Dr. Millicent Lownes-Jackson, thanked Dr. Pickard for the scholarship endowment.

“This is a very, very special day for the College of Business and for me particularly, since Kevin was my former student,” Lownes-Jackson said. “The College of Business is just so thankful for this donation, and everyone who receives that scholarship will have the challenge to emulate the character and success of two phenomenal business icons – Kevin Williams and Dr. Bill Pickard.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University to Participate in 2017 Honda All-Star Challenge National Championship

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University has qualified for yet another Honda Campus All-Star Challenge National Championship.

Five students will represent TSU in the championship tournament in Torrance, California from April 8-12.

Tennessee-State (1)
The TSU Honda All-Star Challenge team members are from left, Terrance George Young, Mikala Jackson, Dr. John Miglietta, coach; Devon Jefferson, captain; and Alekzander Garcia. Ramon Gutierrez, the institutional representative, is not in the photo. (Submitted photo)

The Honda Campus All-Star Challenge is sponsored by American Honda Motor Company in cooperation with the College Bowl Company. The competition brings together 48 historically black colleges and universities to compete in the national championship. It tests students’ knowledge on current events, science, history, literature, art, sports, pop culture, and African-American history.

Honda awards grants to participating institutions with the national champion winning a $75,000 grant.

TSU, a 2007 Honda Campus All-Star Challenge champion, with more than $167,000 in total grant money, has participated in the challenge since 1990.

To qualify for this year’s tournament, the TSU team posted a 3-1 record in the National Qualifying Tournament held at Spelman College earlier this year, with wins over Clark Atlanta, Jackson State, and Tuskegee universities.

“The team played a hard-fought game but lost to host Spelman,” said Dr. John Miglietta, professor of political science and team coach at TSU. “The team is honored to have qualified for the championship tournament and is practicing hard to do well in Torrance.”

He said team members are chosen from various disciplines across campus.

They include Terrance George Young, sophomore, computer science; Mikala Jackson, sophomore, chemistry/biology; Alekzander Garcia, junior, chemistry; and team captain Devon Jefferson, a sophomore marketing major. Ramon Gutierrez, a sophomore accounting major, is the institutional representative.

For more information on the 2017 HCASC, including a full list of the 48 qualifying teams, visit http://www.hcasc.com/nct17/great48.asp.

The last eight games of the tournament are scheduled to be live-streamed. Below are three options to view the live-streamed games:

Direct to a TV or Monitor:

Connect an Internet enabled laptop directly to a TV or Monitor.

Use a web browser to go to http://www.hcasc.com

Using a Projector:

Connect an internet-enabled laptop to a projector and project the laptop image onto the screen.

Use a web browser to go to http://www.hcasc.com

Embedding the live-streamed feed onto a campus web page:

Have the Webmaster or other IT professional email mary@hcasc.com for the embed code. The code will be available on Friday April 7th. This is a great way to share HCASC in real time. If your team makes the Final 8 this is a must do!

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

More than 500 Middle, High School Students Attend 5th Annual STEM Expo at TSU

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) -More than 500 middle and high school students from across Middle Tennessee recently converged on Tennessee State’s campus for one of the largest science fairs in the state.

TSU and the Middle Tennessee STEM Innovation Hub organized the 5th Annual STEM Expo on April 6 in the Gentry Complex.

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Serdarion Bell, left, and Malik Brown, of Johnson Alternative Learning Center in Nashville, display their project on sustainable recycling at the 5th Annual STEM Expo. (Photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

Students from 35 schools displayed the results of 259 STEM projects spanning science, mathematics, engineering, and technology fields: cyber bullying, breast cancer prevention, weather technology and sustainable recycling, just to name a few.

Students competed for bronze, silver, and gold medals based on judges’ evaluations. STEM EXPO sponsors also selected from among all entries for special awards.

Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the TSU College of Engineering, said the Expo was all about preparing the next generation of STEM professionals. He said “of tomorrow’s top 10 best jobs, 7 out of 10 are STEM related.”

“TSU and the College of Engineering are committed to promoting STEM education for Metro Nashville Schools,” Hargrove said. “Higher education and industry must become even more engaged in stimulating interests in STEM careers, and preparing students with the necessary background and skills to enter these occupations in the next decade and beyond.”

Serdarion Bell and Malik Brown of Johnson Alternative Learning Center in Nashville were among the expo participants. Bell, a 9th grader, and Brown, a 10th grader, presented a project titled, “Sustainable Recycling to Meet Community Needs.”

“We wanted to implement environmental conservation and sustainable recycling throughout our school and in our personal lives,” said Bell, on the reason for their project. “At the same time, we wanted to discover how we could help others in our community with little or no money.”

Dr. Lonnie Sharpe, dean of TSU’s College of Life and Physical Sciences, was one of the Expo’s advisers. He said the fair provided “a unique” opportunity for recruitment.

“Maybe we can recruit some of these students to TSU one day,” Sharpe said.

On the character of each project, displays were judged on basic hypothesis, significance of the subject, knowledge beyond what the project shows, presentation, and level of technology.

“There are some very interesting projects at this fair,” said Jonathan Reynolds, a TSU graduate student majoring in Computer Information and Systems Engineering, who was one of the judges. “This is really fun. These kids are well ahead in 21st century technology.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

NASA’s Nationwide Technology Infusion Tour Makes Two-Day Stop at Tennessee State University

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) –Tennessee State University hosted a two-day workshop to provide HBCUs and minority-serving institutions a platform to seek research funding from NASA.

NASA
John Barfield, Director of Engagement and Visibility in the Division of Research and Sponsored Programs at TSU, center, makes a point at the NASA Technology Infusion workshop. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

The NASA HBCU/MSI Technology Infusion Road Tour, on its third HBCU stop, is designed to strengthen research enterprise at historically black colleges and universities and minority serving institutions by providing opportunities for faculty and students to engage in significant research activities.

The tour is also designed to help NASA and large prime contractors meet and/or exceed the agency’s mandated HBCUs/MSI goals.

“We want HBCUs and minority-serving institutions to be actually involved with the next type of technology that will get us beyond earth or tomorrow,” said Dr. Joseph Grant, NASA’s deputy program executive for Small Business Innovation Research. “These technologies are going to be developed by minds of students like those here at TSU and all over the country.”

Grant said HBCUs have a unique way of looking at solving problems that are not always tapped into.

“So what we are trying to do is to bring all the voices to the table to help us solve some of the complex problems that we are going to have. I know what the expertise are, where they lie, how we look at things, and how we attack a problem,” he said.

TSU Associate Vice President for Administration, Dr. Curtis Johnson, in a welcome statement on behalf of President Glenda Glover, said the NASA tour brings “new knowledge and opportunities to TSU.”

“We thank NASA and all of these other agencies for bringing this road trip to TSU,” Johnson said. “We are counting on our faculty and staff to fully maximize the benefit of this opportunity.”

Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young is TSU’s chief research officer and vice president of Research and Institutional Advancement. She said the NASA tour is “very critical” because HBCUs and MSIs have not had the opportunity to significantly participate in their share of federal funding.

“So this is going to teach them strategies on how to be successful in getting that funding,” Crumpton-Young said. “Our expectation is that through this tour and many other efforts, we are going to help strengthen the research enterprise, not only at TSU, but throughout the country.”

Before TSU, the NASA HBCU/MSI Technology Infusion Road Tour stopped at Tuskegee University and North Carolina Central University. The next stop is Jackson State University. Seven agencies and participants from 14 HBCUs attended the workshop at TSU, according to Crumpton-Young.

Tabisa Taliwaku Kalisa, program manager of the Office of Small Business Programs at NASA, said the agency wants to find ways to engage with more minority-serving institutions in its “industrial base.” She said NASA is not reaching its 1 percent goal of doing business with HBCUs and MSIs.

“We are having a hard time meeting those goals because most of our prime contractors cannot find schools that are capable of doing the work,” Kalisa said. “I truly believe that the schools are there, but we have to figure out the synergy to get those schools more engaged, to be able to know about opportunities, and be able to participate.”

Gwen Johnson is director of Small Business at Parsons, a prime contractor. She was part of a group of participants who toured research facilities and classrooms at TSU as part of the NASA visit, and was “very impressed.”

“I look forward to sharing this information with Parsons’ technical experts and connecting them specifically with the TSU Center of Excellence in Information Systems Research in areas of cyber security, data analytics and advanced control and identification systems,” she said.

Among other agencies and contractors at the workshop were the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the National Institutes of Health, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, and the U.S. Department of Army.

“The event allowed faculty to expose their students to research at a higher level, to conferences, internships and maybe even a new career as many of the agencies and companies represented are looking to add new talent to the workforce,” said John Barfield, director of engagement and visibility in TSU’s Division of Research and Institutional Advancement.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU hosts NASA Technology Infusion Road Tour

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is hosting an event this week to help make students aware of programs offered by NASA and other federal agencies.

https---cdn.evbuc.com-images-28153637-50988178194-1-originalThe NASA HBCU/MSI Technology Infusion Road Tour is April 4-5 and is an opportunity for students and university officials to learn more about the space agency’s Mentor-Protégé Program (MPP) in particular, as well as other programs.

The event will also feature key information from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the National Institutes of Health, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the U.S. Department of Army and large prime contractors.

Throughout both days, there will be workshops, panel discussions and networking opportunities.

“The event allows faculty to expose their students to research at a higher level, to conferences, internships and maybe even a new career as many of the agencies and companies represented are looking to add new talent to the workforce,” said John Barfield, director of engagement and visibility in TSU’s Division of Research and Institutional Advancement.

For more information about the NASA HBCU/MSI Technology Infusion Road Tour, visithttps://sites.ed.gov/whhbcu/2016/02/05/the-2016-nasa-hbcumsi-technology-infusion-road-tour/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

 

TSU hosts top business leaders at Women in Leadership Symposium

By K. Dawn Rutledge

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Women across Middle Tennessee made their way to the campus of Tennessee State University for the 2nd Annual Nashville Women in Leadership Symposium on March 29.

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Mrs. Tina Reed, associate director of TSU’s Career Development Center, moderates the discussion. (By Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

The invitation-only event, sponsored by the National Diversity Council and hosted by TSU’s Department of Educational Leadership, drew close to 100 women who focused on the theme, “Be Fearless: Influence, Innovate, and Inspire.”

The half-day symposium brought together a diverse mix of successful women who discussed a number of relevant issues to give women the educational tools and support needed for personal and professional advancement.

“Leadership is what we do and what we teach in our department,” said Dr. Trinetia Repress, chair for the TSU Department of Educational Leadership. “By allowing women to learn from one another, it not only empowers us, but demonstrates through these valuable discussions and interactions that there is a common thread when it comes to the leadership challenges women experience.”

The program’s panel participants included TSU Vice President of Research and Institutional Advancement, Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, who spoke on “The Power of No.” Mrs. Tina Reed, associate director of TSU’s Career Development Center, served as moderator.

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Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, TSU Vice President of Research and Institutional Advancement, talks with an attendee. (By Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

“When we say ‘no’, it should be about fulfilling our goals, values, core beliefs, and priorities,” Crumpton-Young said. “If anything goes against those things, then ‘no’ is the right answer.”

Joining Crumpton-Young on the panel were Lauren Lane Payne, senior vice president of philanthropy at Habitat for Humanity of Greater Nashville; Ann Hatcher, vice president of Key Talent Acquisition and Development for HCA; Dr. Alkyna Finch, certified coach, author and speaker; and Vail R. Brown, senior vice president of Global Business Development and Marketing at STR. Each panelist gave perspective on topics ranging from generational mentoring and support, to authentic leadership, leveraging social media and career transition.

Ashlyn Outler, director of the Women in Leadership Symposiums for the National Diversity Council, said TSU has been a great host partner in their efforts to expand awareness in the area. This is the second year the Council has partnered with the university through Educational Leadership. In 2016, TSU’s Dr. Alisa Mosley, associate vice president for the Division of Academic Affairs, was a panelist, and Ms. Seanne Wilson, coordinator of the TSU Women’s Center, handled moderator duties.

The National Diversity Council is the first non-profit organization to bring together the private, public and non-profit sectors to discuss the many dimensions and benefits of a multicultural environment. It is currently made up of state and regional councils, the National Women’s Council, the Council for Corporate Responsibility, and the Healthcare Diversity Council.

“We have embarked on an aggressive initiative to expand our brand and this powerful leadership symposium is helping us to do that,” Outler said. “We have 25 established councils around the country and abroad, and we have been very excited about being at TSU for a second year working with Dr. Trinetia Respress to get women talking about leadership and diversity.”

The Center for American Progress, an independent nonpartisan policy institute, reports that women continue to lag substantially behind men when it comes to their representation in leadership positions. According to the CAP, while women make up 50.8 percent of the U.S. population and 47 percent of the U.S. labor force, they represent only 14.6 percent of executive officers, 8.1 percent of top earners, 4.6 percent of Fortune 500 CEOs and only 16.9 percent of Fortune 500 board seats.

“It is our hope that we can develop a long-term relationship with the National Diversity Council,” Repress said. “By working with this event, we hope to continue the important dialogue about the challenges women face in leadership.”

Department of Media Relations

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About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.