Category Archives: EVENTS

TSU Drum Line Participates in World’s Largest Percussionist Convention, Festival

The Tennessee State University Drum Line  performed recently Nov. 9 at the TSU football game in Hale Stadium, and is  among several other major university percussion groups that will present exhibition performances at this year’s Marching Percussion Festival in Indianapolis. (photo by John Cross, TSU media Relations)
The Tennessee State University Drum Line performed recently Nov. 9 at the TSU football game in Hale Stadium, and is among several other major university percussion groups that will present exhibition performances at this year’s Marching Percussion Festival in Indianapolis. (photo by John Cross, TSU media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The Tennessee State University Drum Line is among several other major university percussion groups that will present exhibition performances at this year’s Marching Percussion Festival in Indianapolis, Nov. 13-16.

The festival is part of the Percussive Arts Society International Convention, the largest percussion event in the world, featuring more than 120 concerts, clinics, master classes, labs, workshops, panels and presentations.

In addition to taking part in all of these events, TSU, only the third HBCU drum line to be invited to PASIC in it 38-year existence, will participate in the group’s first-ever drum line battle, featuring Ball State University, the University of Michigan, Indiana University, Lamar University, the University of Cincinnati, and the University of North Alabama.

“Being invited to present an exhibition performance for the Persuasive Arts Society International Convention is indeed an honor,” said Dr. Sean Daniels, assistant Band Director and Percussion Area Leader. “Participating on a global stage brings positive attention to our students as well as the institution”

According to Daniels, with more than 6,000 participating in PASIC each year, percussion artists present and perform in areas including drum set, marching, keyboard, symphonic, timpani, music technology and new music, among others.

In one-on-one competition, TSU will go against the University of Cincinnati in the Drum Line Battle, while in the College Snares, senior Music major Steven Phillips (Solo Snare Drum), will represent TSU against representatives from Southern Arkansas University, University of Texas at Austin, Missouri Western State University and Troy University.

In College Key Board, Malcolm Jackson, junior Music Education major (Solo Marimba), will be the face of the Aristocrat of Bands Drum Line against those from the University of South Carolina, Mississippi State University, Texas A&M University-Commerce, Lamar University and UT Martin.

Derrick Greene, junior Music Education major (Solo Timpani), will perform in exhibition in the College Timpani.

“I am excited about this event and the amount of knowledge our students will gain from attending this year’s PASIC convention. I am confident that our students will cherish this experience for many years to come,” Daniels added.

PASIC, a music service organization based in Indianapolis, promotes percussion education, research performance and appreciation throughout the world. The organization is considered the central source for information and networking for percussionists and drummers of all ages.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

iRegister Campaign Eliminates Long Lines, Offers Incentives For Early Registration

Dr. Mark Hardy
Dr. Mark Hardy

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The usual long lines in financial aid and admissions during registration could be a thing of the past if students and parents follow a new plan by the Office of Academic Affairs.

iRegister Campaign, an early registration initiative, is aimed to ensure that enough classes and faculty are available as needed, students get the needed assistance to pay their fees or schedule payment on time, as well as ensure that parents and students are adequately assisted in getting their financial aid requests processed in a timely manner.

A kickoff rally, with music, free food, prizes and special incentives for those completing registration early, is set for the start of the spring registration on Monday, Nov. 11 in the Student Center.

“This campaign is designed to get the majority of our students to take advantage of the regular registration period prior to the start of class each semester,” said Dr. Mark Hardy, vice president for Academic Affairs. “Students typically wait until just before the start of class each semester to register.”

He said students create this lateness sometimes because they do not have the funds to complete their registration, while others wait to take advantage of spaces later created by registered students who have been purged or dropped from classes because of non-payment of fees.

“This gives them the advantage of getting their choice of course time and instructor they want,” the Vice President said, adding that the iRegister Campaign is designed to mitigate this practice.

Rully Dean, a junior Cardio-Respiratory Therapy major from St. Louis, likes the new plan.

“I think it is a good idea,” said Dean, a member of the Student Board of Governors, who said she has always registered early. “I have never been in a long line during registration except for once and briefly for a verification issue, but many students wait until the day before class starts to register. That creates problems.”

According to Dr. Hardy, the long lines for the spring registration will be eliminated if a “significant number” of students register and confirm their registration before leaving for the holiday break.

“This way we will know the exact number of sections that will be required and thereby know the number of regular and adjunct faculty needed. This will significantly improve our ability to appropriately budget for our course offerings,” Hardy explained.

He said department chairs will monitor classes during the registration period, and in the event a class is filled, another section of that class will be added.

“Once students have selected classes after being properly advised in the department, they will be encouraged to pay their fees and confirm registration,” Hardy added.

As an incentive, Hardy said the first 200 students who confirm registration will receive a $10 iTunes gift card and a lapel sticker visible to other students indicating that the wearer has iRegistered.

“Hopefully students will begin to do this naturally resulting in more and more students completing the registration process in a timely manner,” Dr. Hardy said.

“This will really be very helpful, because the long lines are just not necessary sometime,” Dean added.

The iRegister Campaign will run through the regular spring registration period from Nov. 11 to Jan. 15, 2014. For more information, call (615) 963-5301 or go to http://www.tnstate.edu/academic_affairs/.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU College of Ag to Conduct Good Agricultural Practices Workshop Nov. 7-8

The GAP workshop on Nov. 7-8 will teach growers the guidelines stipulated by the USDA and FDA in order to comply with the Food Safety Management Act.
The GAP workshop on Nov. 7-8 will teach growers the guidelines stipulated by the USDA and FDA in order to comply with the Food Safety Management Act.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Sustainable Food Safety and Security starts with the producers. As such, growers play a vital role in the supply chain of safe, fresh produce production, harvesting, cleaning, handling, packaging and delivery. To address this important step in the process, the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences will conduct a Good Agricultural Practices Workshop on Nov. 7 and 8 in the Farrell-Westbrook Complex on the main campus. The workshop will start at 8:45 a.m. on Nov. 7, and at 8 a.m. on Nov. 8.

Experts from TSU, the University of California, Davis; The University of Illinois; and the U.S. Department of Agriculture will conduct the workshop.

According to organizers from CAHNS, growers attending this workshop will learn to follow the “stringent and specific guidelines” of the USDA and the Food and Drug Administration in complying with the conditions of the Food Safety Modernization Act to minimize the risk of serious health consequences or death. Technical training will be provided to empower participants to meet the consumer demand for safe produce and ensure competitiveness in the fresh produce industry.

This project is funded by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

For more information, contact Dr. Agnes Kilonzo-Nthenge at (615) 963 5437 or akilonzontheng@tnstate.edu.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Homecoming Parade Returns to Historic Jefferson Street

Members of the TSU cheerleading squad march in the 2012 Homecoming parade. This year, the parade returns to Jefferson Street and will begin at 8 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 26. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)
Members of the TSU cheerleading squad march in the 2012 Homecoming parade. This year, the parade returns to Jefferson Street and will begin at 8 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 26. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

Parade takes to the streets at 8 a.m.

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The Tennessee State University Homecoming Parade will return to its roots this year, beginning on Jefferson Street, and proceeding through the community that has supported the University for the past 50 years.

That makes Yusef Harris very happy.

The owner of the Alkebu-Lan Images bookstore, who last year saw a decline in profits due to the route change, was excited when he heard the news that the parade was making a comeback to the historic Jefferson Street community.

“Homecoming is a special community event for all the small business owners along the parade corridor,” said Harris. “Last year we missed out on some of the economic benefits when the route changed. There is a lot of excitement in the business community on the parade’s return. It’s a mutually beneficial event for the school and the community.”

Click for parade route (graphic by Joshua Holly, TSU Creative Services)
Click for parade route 

The 2013 Homecoming parade, themed Tennessee State University: New Century, New Direction for Excellence, takes place Saturday, Oct. 26, beginning at 8 a.m. from the corner of 14th Avenue and Jefferson Street. At least 10 bands are expected to march the two-mile route through the streets of the community and into the University. TSU President, Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover, will serve as Grand Marshall.

The only change in this year’s parade is the time, beginning an hour earlier than before.

“Homecoming at Tennessee State University is unlike any other,” said Cassandra Griggs, director of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving. “The Homecoming game at LP Field starts an hour earlier at 4 o’clock so we needed to adjust the schedule to allow all our alumni and community guests ample time to make it to the game.”

Last year, the route was moved from Jefferson Street to around the exterior of the campus for the Centennial celebration, to accommodate large floats and a larger influx in crowd size. Crowds in 2011 were estimated at 50,000, with the 2012 parade bringing in more than double that amount.

According to TSU Police, officials this year are bracing for at least 40-50,000 parade-goers, with half of that number between 28th Avenue and Jefferson Street to the parade’s end at 33rd Avenue and Albion Street.

“We’ll have extra security from the Metro Nashville Police Department to augment our forces during the parade,” said Assistant Police Chief, Anthony Carter. “We just want to make sure everyone has a safe and fun time.”

Harris, whose business is located on the corner of 28th Avenue and Jefferson Street, said he is ready for the return not only because of the economic impact, but also because of the sense of pride the parade brings to the community.

“This annual event fills all of us, not only the business community but the community at large, with pride,” he said. “It is a piece of our tradition and history, and we are glad to see it back where it belongs.”

A parade shuttle service will be available for TSU employee staff and volunteers departing from the Gentry Center at 6 a.m., and for the TSU Royal Court departing from the airplane in front of Kean Hall at 6:30 a.m.

The staging area for parade participants will take place between 12th and 16th Avenue from Meharry Boulevard to Jackson Street. The Metro Nashville Police Department will close Jefferson Street to the University beginning at 7:30 a.m.

For more information, contact 615.963.5331.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU Announces Homecoming, Inaugural Week Events

Homecoming2013University ushers in a New Century, New Direction for Excellence

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will hold a week full of exciting events October 20-26 as community members, alumni and friends of the University come to Nashville to celebrate Homecoming 2013 and the Investiture of the University’s eight president, Dr. Glenda Glover.

Inspired by last year’s centennial and moving forward into its next 100 years, TSU will celebrate a New Century, New Direction for Excellence for 2013 with a week full of events.

“Homecoming at Tennessee State University is unlike any other,” said Cassandra Griggs, Director of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving. “It’s a time to reconnect with old friends, classmates, and reminisce about the days they walked the campus as a student. The positive changes and growth are remarkable. Although there has been much expansion, the traditions of Tennessee State A&I remain sound.”

While TSU has cherished and maintained certain Homecoming traditions, it has also moved forward across the century, finding new ways to celebrate pride in the institution, its students and alumni. Innovations that have sprung up over the years include the parade, pep rally, Homecoming Court, tent parties and many additional campus activities.

This year sees the return of the Homecoming Parade back to Jefferson Street. The parade route will begin at 14th Avenue and Jefferson Street, and proceed two miles to 33rd Avenue and Albion Street. Last year, the route was moved for the Centennial celebration only to accommodate large floats and a large influx in crowd size. This year’s parade begins at 8 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 26.

The annual Robert Murrell Oratorical Contest will officially kick off homecoming week on Sunday, Oct. 20 beginning at 3 p.m. in the Floyd Payne Campus Center. The Gospel Explosion rounds out the evening, beginning at 6 p.m. also in the Floyd Payne Campus Center.

Student events highlight Monday, Oct. 21 when the Courtyard Show takes place in Welton Plaza starting at 11 a.m., followed by the Battle of the Residence Halls at 7 p.m. in the Floyd Payne Campus Center.

The Blue Sapphire Awards will take place on Tuesday, Oct. 22 in the Walter S. Davis Humanities Building in the Poag Auditorium beginning at 6:30 p.m.

Presidential Inaugural events kick off Wednesday, Oct. 23 in conjunction with Homecoming starting with the Presidential Processional at 11 a.m., and the Mr. and Miss TSU Coronation and Ball at 7 p.m. in Kean Hall.

Events continue on Thursday, Oct. 24 with the Inaugural Ecumenical Prayer Breakfast at 7:30 a.m., a service of fellowship bringing together leaders of the faith community to impart well wishes and solidarity to President Glenda Glover and the TSU community. The day continues with the Inaugural Symposium on the Common Core State Standards at 10 a.m. at the Avon Williams campus Auditorium, and Homecoming Concert at 7 p.m. in Kean Hall.  A special “From the Rough,” movie premiere and reception round out the evening beginning at 5:30 p.m., and is an exclusive invite only presentation of the inspiring film based on the true story of Dr. Catana Starks, a former Tennessee State University swim coach, who became the first woman ever to coach a college men’s golf team.

Friday, Oct. 25 begins with the Investiture of President Glenda Baskin Glover as 8th President of the University beginning at 9 a.m. in the Howard Gentry Complex. Homecoming events include the Charles Campbell Fish Fry on the President’s Lawn at 11 a.m., the annual Pep Rally at 11:45 a.m. in Hale Stadium, and the TSU Pan-Hellenic Step Show at 5 p.m. in the Gentry Complex. Tickets are $10 for students in advance, $15 at the door. The night ends with the Inaugural Reception and Scholarship Gala beginning at 6 p.m. at the Gaylord Opryland Resort.

Saturday, Oct. 26 begins with the Homecoming Parade beginning at 8 a.m., followed by the Showcase of Bands at 2 p.m. at LP Field. The Homecoming football game between TSU and Eastern Illinois kicks off at 4 p.m. at LP Field. Fans attending the game are asked to review the tailgating guidelines.

View the complete list of alumni, student, reunion and inaugural events.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University
With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU Holds Common Core State Standards Symposium Oct. 24

TNCORE logoNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will hold an Inaugural Symposium, addressing the Common Core State Standards. The symposium, titled, “The Common Core Standards and Tennessee Higher Education: Challenges, Opportunities, Resources, Equity (CORE)” will feature panelists from the federal, state and local levels.

The symposium takes place Thursday, Oct. 24 at the Avon Williams Campus auditorium beginning at 10 a.m., and is free and open to the public. Discussions will focus on the standards’ deployment, teacher preparation, curriculum development and impact on higher education in Tennessee.

The topic, selected by TSU President Glenda Glover for the academic symposium on the occasion of her inauguration, is an expression of a focus on teacher education that began with Tennessee State University’s founding and remains central to its mission today.  The Common Core State Standards aspire to the vision of providing an internationally competitive, career and college-focused, quality education for all students in the state of Tennessee.

“Meaningful steps toward this vision have never been easy, but the faculty, staff, administration, students and alumni of Tennessee State University have significantly reduced the distance toward this goal since 1912,” said Dr. Evelyn Nettles, associate vice president of Academic Affairs and symposium committee co-chair.  “The primary purpose of this symposium is to communicate – to teachers, parents, and all members of our educational community – the University’s ongoing dedication to this mission as we begin our second century.”

The symposium’s discussion will focus on the national conversation regarding the standards and the following themes: the challenges of moving toward higher-level skills and deeper learning and the new opportunities for collaboration offered by a common educational effort across most of the country.

“In addressing these themes, the symposium adds a practical focus on resources at the federal, state and local level,” added Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College of Engineering and symposium committee co-chair, “including the commitment of the University’s College of Education to serve as an ongoing resource for Tennessee educators in implementing the standards and realizing their benefits for students.”

According to Nettles, the symposium’s fourth theme of equity expresses the ideal of the Common Core State Standards – an educational system in which all students can move between schools, between states, or into college without surmounting enormous shifts in expectations – as well as an ethical commitment necessary in at least some measure for their success.

To accompany the symposium, a common core module will be available on-line for practicing educators and pre-selected teacher candidates that focuses on developing effective lesson plans using differentiated instruction. The module will be self-paced and offers 1 CEU for 10 hours of online contact.

“The module will provide teachers the tools to create lesson plans based on different backgrounds of the students in their classroom,” said Dr. Heraldo Richards, associate dean of the College of Education. “This will allow teachers to help students reach their potential while addressing the Common Core State Standards.”

The symposium moderator and featured panelists include:

Moderator:

Vicki Yates, News Channel 5 Anchor

Panelists:

Dr. Peggy Carr
Associate Commissioner, Assessment Division
National Center for Education Statistics

Kevin S. Huffman, J.D.
Commissioner
Tennessee Department of Education

Jamie Woodson, J.D.
President and Chief Executive Officer
Tennessee State Collaborative on Reforming Education (SCORE)

For more information, contact Nettles or Hargrove at 615.963.7001.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

Distinguished Lecture Series Welcomes Keith Boykin to Campus October 9

Keith Boykin
Keith Boykin

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Fighting Words will be the topic of discussion, Wednesday, Oct. 9 when Tennessee State University welcomes Keith Boykin to campus.

The event, part of the Distinguished Lecture Series sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs, will take place in Kean Hall beginning at 1 p.m. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Boykin is a CNBC contributor, MSNBC commentator, BET columnist, and New York Times best-selling author. Each of Boykin’s four books has been nominated for a Lambda Literary Award, including his most recent book, For Colored Boys Who Have Considered Suicide When The Rainbow Is Still Not Enough, which also won the American Library Association Stonewall Award for Nonfiction in 2013.

Educated at Dartmouth and Harvard, Boykin attended law school with President Barack Obama, and served in the White House as a special assistant to President Bill Clinton, where he was once the highest-ranking openly gay person in the Clinton White House. He also helped organize and participated in the nation’s first ever meeting between a sitting president and leaders of the LGBT community.

Boykin has been actively involved in progressive causes since he worked on his first congressional campaign while still a student in high school. He is a veteran of six political campaigns, including two presidential campaigns, and was named one of the top instructors when he taught political science at American University in Washington, D.C.

He has traveled extensively across four continents, and in 1997, was appointed by President Clinton to the U.S. presidential trade delegation to Zimbabwe, along with Coretta Scott King and the Reverend Jesse Jackson.

After starring on the 2004 Showtime television series American Candidate, Boykin has since appeared on numerous national media programs, including Anderson Cooper 360, The O’Reilly Factor, The Tyra Banks Show, The Montel Williams Show, Judge Hatchett and The Tom Joyner Morning Show.

A founder and first board president of the National Black Justice Coalition, Boykin has spoken to audiences, large and small, across the world. He delivered a landmark speech to more than 200,000 people at the Millennium March on Washington, and gave a stirring speech about the AIDS epidemic in front of 40,000 people in Chicago’s Soldier Field in July 2006.

Born and raised in St. Louis, Boykin lives in New York City and Miami.

Former Lecture Series guests have included actress Tasha Smith, actor and author Hill Harper, actress Robin Givens, and four-time Olympic athlete Jackie Joyner-Kersee.

For more information on the Distinguished Lecture Series, contact the Office of Student Affairs at 615.963.5621 or the Office of Media Relations at 615.963.5331.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU Announces Homecoming Week Activities

Members of the Aristocrat of Bands march up Ed Temple Boulevard during the 2012 Homecoming Parade. This year the parade returns to its original route beginning at 14th Avenue and Jefferson Street to 33rd Avenue and Albion Street. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
Members of the Aristocrat of Bands march up Ed Temple Boulevard during the 2012 Homecoming Parade. This year the parade returns to its original route beginning at 14th Avenue and Jefferson Street to 33rd Avenue and Albion Street. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

University ushers in a New Century, New Direction for Excellence

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will hold a week full of exciting events October 20-26 as community members, alumni and friends of the University come to Nashville to celebrate Homecoming 2013.

Inspired by last year’s centennial and moving forward into its next 100 years, TSU will celebrate a New Century, New Direction for Excellence for 2013 with a week full of events.

“Homecoming at Tennessee State University is unlike any other,” said Sandra Griggs, Director of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving. “It’s a time to reconnect with old friends, classmates, and reminisce about the days they walked the campus as a student. The positive changes and growth are remarkable. Although there has been much expansion, the traditions of Tennessee State A&I remain sound.”

While TSU has cherished and maintained certain Homecoming traditions, it has also moved forward across the century, finding new ways to celebrate pride in the institution, its students and alumni. Innovations that have sprung up over the years include the parade, pep rally, Homecoming Court, tent parties and many additional campus activities.

This year sees the return of the Homecoming Parade back to Jefferson Street. The parade route will begin at 14th Avenue and Jefferson Street, and proceed two miles to 33rd Avenue and Albion Street. Last year, the route was moved for the Centennial celebration only to accommodate large floats and a large influx in crowd size. This year’s parade begins at 8 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 26.

The annual Robert Murrell Oratorical Contest will officially kick off homecoming week on Sunday, Oct. 20 beginning at 3 p.m. in the Floyd Payne Campus Center. The Gospel Explosion rounds out the evening, beginning at 6 p.m. also in the Floyd Payne Campus Center.

Student events highlight Monday, Oct. 21 when the Courtyard Show takes place in Welton Plaza starting at 11 a.m., followed by the Battle of the Residence Halls at 7 p.m. in the Floyd Payne Campus Center.

The Blue Sapphire Awards will take place on Tuesday, Oct. 22 in the Walter S. Davis Humanities Building in the Poag Auditorium beginning at 6:30 p.m.

Presidential Inaugural events kick off Wednesday, Oct. 23 in conjunction with Homecoming starting with the Presidential Processional at 11 a.m., and the Mr. and Miss TSU Coronation and Ball at 7 p.m. in Kean Hall.

Events continue on Thursday, Oct. 24 with the Inaugural Symposium at 10 a.m. at the Avon Williams campus Auditorium, and Homecoming Concert at 7 p.m. in Kean Hall.

Friday, Oct. 25 begins with the Investiture of President Glenda Baskin Glover as 8th President of the University beginning at 9 a.m. in the Howard Gentry Complex. Homecoming events include the Charles Campbell Fish Fry on the President’s Lawn at 11 a.m., the annual Pep Rally at 11:45 a.m. in Hale Stadium, and the TSU Pan-Hellenic Step Show at 5 p.m. in the Gentry Complex. Tickets are $10 for students in advance, $15 at the door. The night ends with the Inaugural Reception and Scholarship Gala beginning at 6 p.m. at the Gaylord Opryland Resort.

Saturday, Oct. 26 begins with the Homecoming Parade beginning at 8 a.m., followed by the Showcase of Bands at 2 p.m. at LP Field. The Homecoming football game between TSU and Eastern Illinois kicks off at 4 p.m. at LP Field.

View the complete list of alumni, student, reunion and inaugural events.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU to Welcome 5-Time Grammy Winner Victor Wooten Oct. 4

victor_wootenNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will welcome five-time Grammy award winning musician Victor Wooten Friday, Oct. 4 for an appearance with students, professors and the community in Poag Auditorium.

Wooten, author of The Music Lesson: A Spiritual Search for Growth Through Music, which discusses the musician’s life lessons about the elements of music, will be the second guest of the newly launched lecture series, “Music Matters: Hosted by Dr. Rod Taylor,” sponsored by the Department of Language, Literature and Philosophy.

Wooten’s lecture will feature a mixture of music from some of his earlier and most recent recordings.

Dr. Rod Taylor, assistant professor of Literature and Writing and creative consultant and editor on Wooten’s book, said he and the musician and author will discuss the process of working on the book, which is available in four languages and being used in curriculums in universities, high schools and learning institutions around the world.

“Through our exchange, I hope students will see how writing can be a collaborative project and how the joy of writing is in the process not just the end product,” Taylor said. “I also hope they can see the unique relationship among language, writing, teaching and music.”

Taylor’s English 1010 class will be the subject of Wooten’s lecture.

Wooten, whose solo efforts and collaboration with artists like Stanley Clark, Bruce Hornsby, India Arie and Dave Matthews have led him to be regarded as one of the greatest bass players of all times, is revered by his fans and peers for his uncanny skills on the guitar.

Two of his latest CDs, “Words and Tones,” a collection of 14 tracks featuring various female vocalists; and the instrumental, “Words and Stone,” represent the various sides of Wooten’s unique approach to music, performance and songwriting highlighted by a searing bass solos that will boggle the mind.

Wooten continues to tour with his band, The Victor Wooten Band, which has received rave review on their last three tours.

The Oct. 4 appearance in Poag Auditorium will begin promptly at 12:40 p.m. For more information, contact Dr. Rod Taylor at rodctaylor1@gmail.com or 615-963-4896.

For more information about this series, visit the Music Matters Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/musicmattersconversations

This is the second guest in the “Music Matters” series. The first guest was legendary bass guitarist Chuck Rainey who made at one-day appearance at the University September 12.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

“Surviving the Storm” Comes to TSU Sept. 26

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Lisa Spencer and the 4WARN Weather Team bring “Surviving the Storm” to Tennessee State University Thursday, Sept. 26 beginning at 7 p.m. in the Cox-Lewis Theatre in the Performing Arts Center.

 “Surviving the Storm” is a multi-media program where guests learn the “what, why and how” of severe thunderstorms and what they can do to be safe.  Participants find out things like what makes a thunderstorm “severe”, when and where tornadoes happen the most, and the safest place to be no matter where they are…at home or out shopping.  Come meet the 4WARN Weather Team including Lisa Spencer, Dan Thomas, Paul Heggen and Nancy Van Camp along with the legendary Snowbird.

The doors open at 6 p.m. and the first 50 people to enter receive a free Snowbird goodie.  Other door prizes will be given away at the end of the program.  There will also be opportunities to ask questions of the team.

Join Channel 4 Thursday, Sept. 26 at 7 p.m. in the TSU Performing Arts Center. The program is free and open to the public.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu