Category Archives: EVENTS

Honors Program, Former Director to be recognized during TSU Scholarship Gala

Dr. McDonald Williams
Dr. McDonald Williams

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – It is a program that has spanned 50 years and has seen the likes of future lawyers, surgeons, engineers, business CEOs, and even the University president, Dr. Glenda Glover.

Now, Tennessee State University’s Honor Program and one of its most treasured figures will be recognized during The 2014 Scholarship Gala Friday, Sept. 26. Themed, “An evening of Honors,” the celebration will pay tribute to long-time director, Dr. McDonald Williams, and the growth of the program since 1963.

“This really is a time to celebrate the program and one of the most instrumental persons behind it,” said Dr. Coreen Jackson, current director of the Honor Program. “Dr. Williams, while not the original founder, laid the cornerstone of academic excellence and the standard of which this program was built upon.”

Under then University President, Dr. Walter S. Davis, a committee was charged with studying Honors programs and determining the feasibility of establishing one at the University. The committee recommended that TSU keep pace with other institutions throughout the country. As a result, an Honors Program for freshman students started in the fall of 1964. Sophomore through senior level course work was added yearly throughout 1968.

Williams spent 30 years at the University serving as a professor of English, and as director of the Honors Program for 23 years before retiring in 1988.

The program, said Jackson, has gone through many changes throughout the years. Today it boasts more than 400 students; 145 of which are first-time freshmen. The goal is to transition the program into an Honors College in the near future. But the foundation built by Williams still holds true today, she said.

“He [Dr. Williams] had a vision for where the program needed to go and subsequent directors, including Jane Elliott and Sandra Holt have carried that vision forward,” said Jackson.

Former CNN anchor and now Al Jazeera America special correspondent Soledad O'Brien, addressed the student body and faculty March 26 during the University Honors Convocation in Kean Hall. Earlier in the day, O'Brien was the featured speaker at the Honors Program 50th Anniversary Luncheon honoring Dr. McDonald Williams, the first Director of the Honors Program. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)
Former CNN anchor and now Al Jazeera America special correspondent Soledad O’Brien, addressed the student body and faculty March 26 during the University Honors Convocation in Kean Hall. Earlier in the day, O’Brien was the featured speaker at the Honors Program 50th Anniversary Luncheon honoring Dr. McDonald Williams, the first Director of the Honors Program. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

The yearlong celebration of the Honors Program kicked off earlier this year and was capped by a visit on March 26 by award-winning broadcast journalist Soledad O’Brien. The former CNN anchor was the featured speaker at the Honors Anniversary Luncheon as well as the keynote speaker during the Honors Day Convocation.

Other events planned include a Black Tie Gala held earlier this year, and an Honors Research Symposium to coincide with the University-Wide Research Symposium. In the fall, the celebration will culminate with a special 50th Anniversary cake-cutting ceremony and an Honors Week observance.

Scholarship Gala Advert 5x8According to Jackson, the primary goal of the celebration is two-fold. The first is to bring awareness to the program that creates and maintains a community of academically bright and talented students who serve as campus leaders and role models. The second, she said, was to raise the necessary funds to transition the program to a college.

“The key objective is the academic enrichment of our students and working with them to achieve their goals,” she added. “We have the opportunity to teach students who are excited about learning and have the freedom to explore issues from multiple points of view. The program not only impacts the students but also the entire University.”

The jubilee celebration kicks off with an “Honors 50 for 50” campaign to raise $500,000 to help the program transition to an Honors College. The new college, she said, will encourage interdisciplinary programs, enhance undergraduate research in all disciplines, advisement for prestigious fellowships and scholarships, mentoring programs, and lifelong learning, including a global perspective through study abroad.

“As a College, we will be able to highlight the importance of offering an enriched honors curriculum and to increase the University’s ability to recruit and retain high-ability students,” added Jackson.  “We have a program that has a national reputation and it already meets the characteristics of an Honors College, as recommended by the National Collegiate Honors Council, the recognized leader in undergraduate honor education.”

For more information on the 2014 Scholarship Gala call 615.963.5481 or visit www.tnstate.edu/scholarshipgala. The gala takes place Friday, Sept. 26 at Music City Center and tickets are available now to purchase.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

From St. Louis and Across the Globe, New Students Descend on TSU Campus During Freshmen Move-In

Sara Franklin (center) was joined by her parents Dr. Sharilyn (left) and Clifford Franklin (right) during Freshmen Move-In August 21. The Franklins traveled from St. Louis and joined more than 1,200 first-time freshmen and new students move onto the Nashville campus. (photos by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)
Sara Franklin (center) was joined by her parents Dr. Sharilyn (left) and Clifford Franklin (right) during Freshmen Move-In August 21. The Franklins traveled from St. Louis and joined more than 1,200 first-time freshmen and new students move onto the Nashville campus. (photos by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Sara Franklin visited quite a few colleges before deciding on the school that best fit her academic goals and aspirations. Out of the many choices, the 18-year-old from St. Louis selected Tennessee State University based on one recommendation; one that she said influenced her more than any campus visit—a recommendation from the University President, Glenda Glover.

Franklin met Dr. Glover for the first time in Montreal at a conference. She said she was inspired by the accomplishments of the president, including the fact that the alumna was now the leader of one of the top Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in the country.

“She told me about the great programs at the University and how the school was a wonderful place for me to start my academic career,” Franklin said. “I was impressed by her credentials as a CPA and lawyer, and that is something I aspire to as well. I think this will be a good fit.”

Franklin joined more than 1,200 first-time freshmen and new students who moved onto the Nashville campus as part of “Freshmen Move-In Day” Thursday, Aug. 21, in preparation for classes that begin on Monday for the fall term.

Her parents, Mr. Clifford and Dr. Sharilyn Franklin, couldn’t be more pleased with their daughter’s choice, saying Tennessee State University not only offered strong academic programs, but research opportunities, which add institutional value, and a vibrant alumni relations program.

“These types of programs and opportunities speak volumes for the university,” said Sharilyn Franklin. “The world is shrinking and is now a global society, so to be able to network with alumni across the country and the world is something that will be very important once she (Sara) graduates and begins her professional career.”

Both parents were also impressed by the accolades of the University, and while it is a mid-size campus with nearly 9,000 students, it is still small enough to provide a nurturing environment.

“I have a lot of respect for HBCUs and the quality of education and support they provide for students,” said Clifford Franklin. “Sara is a product of private schools and I know this will be a life-enriching experience for her. I know she will get a great education here and a nurturing atmosphere that will help her grow.”

Gerald Davis (left) helps during new student move- in Thursday, Aug. 21. More than 200 volunteers, including student organizations, alumni, staff and friends  helped move nearly 1,200 students into their rooms during the annual tradition of Freshmen Move-In.
Gerald Davis (left) helps during Freshman Move- In Day Thursday, Aug. 21. More than 200 volunteers, including student organizations, alumni, staff and friends, helped move nearly 1,200 students into their rooms during the annual tradition of Freshmen Move-In.

More than 200 volunteers made Move-In Day easier for students like Sara. Student organizations, alumni, staff and friends helped to move luggage, boxes of personal belongings and other items, while other volunteers assisted with providing directions and staffing water and refreshment stations for new residents.

While temperatures soared into the mid-90s, volunteers did not let that damper their enthusiasm and excitement as they helped new students settle into their new homes. Among those helping was Samantha Thomas, a senior Dental Hygiene major and reigning Miss TSU.

“I think it was great that we had so many volunteers, from administrators and staff to older students, to show we really are one big family,” Thomas said. “The upperclassmen were definitely excited to help and welcome our new ‘Big Blue’ family members to help with their transition.”

And that is just what Sharilyn Franklin is counting on as her only child is now on her own for the first time.

“I love the sense and feeling of family here on campus,” she said tearing up. “I know my daughter will be in good hands, plus when she gets homesick it’s only a few hours away.”

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Holds Annual Tradition of Freshman Service Day Saturday, Aug. 23

TSU freshmen work at one of the community gardens in Nashville last year as part of the Annual  Freshman Service Day. This year's service day, The Big Blue Blitz, takes place Saturday, Aug. 23. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
TSU freshmen work at one of the community gardens in Nashville last year as part of the Annual Freshman Service Day. This year’s service day, The Big Blue Blitz, takes place Saturday, Aug. 23. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Incoming students at Tennessee State University will take part in an annual tradition Saturday, Aug. 23 that has become part of the freshman experience. Termed the “Big Blue Blitz,” more than 500 students will spread out over Nashville in an effort to give back to the community and build relationships with those in need.

According to Dr. Linda Guthrie, director of the Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement, the Day of Service is an opportunity for first-year students to get out into the community and experience its needs and culture beyond the TSU campus.

One of the goals is to help students connect with their new community and each other.

“This is basically neighbors helping neighbors,” said Guthrie. “This is a good way to introduce our new students to serving the community and become a part of their everyday life. We have a rich tradition of service at the University and try to instill in our students an strong ethic of caring and a sense of responsibility for making our community and world a better place.”

During the day, the University will see volunteers from around the campus including not only students, but also faculty, staff and alumni, pitch in at more than 20 different organizations that help needy, hungry and homeless people in the Greater Nashville area.

Volunteers will not only help at the University, but also Safe Haven, Project CURE and Nashville CARES, White’s Creek Community Garden, Earth Matters, and ThriftSmart in both Nashville and Franklin. Volunteers will also help out at the Nashville Food Project, Kirkpatrick Elementary School, Feed the Children and the Andrew Jackson Boys and Girls Clubs.

The service-day event takes place from 7 a.m. until 1 p.m. Volunteers will gather at the Gentry Center for transportation to area work sites, departing at approximately 7:30 a.m. and begin returning by noon. TSU officials encourage volunteers and students who are required to complete service learning hours aged to sign up at http://bit.ly/1sZ0Uty.

For more information, contact the Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement at 615.963.2920.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

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TSU Announces 2014 Homecoming Week Activities

University Celebrates Tradition of Excellence

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READ the full Homecoming Schedule

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will hold a week full of exciting events September 21-27 as community members, alumni and friends of the University come to Nashville to celebrate Homecoming 2014.

Homecoming is a rich, always anticipated tradition of the TSU community. Each fall, Tigers of all generations return to campus to reconnect and share memories. This year, alumni, family and community members will take part in Celebrating the Tradition of Excellence.

“There’s nothing like a Big Blue Homecoming. We look forward to welcoming all of our distinguished alumni back to the University for an exciting week filled with special memories, camaraderie and cheerful giving,” said Cassandra Griggs, director of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving. “This is the opportunity for alumni to see how their alma mater continues to positively transform the lives of its students, and learn about the outstanding academic programs, talented students and campus enhancements.”

HC7While TSU has cherished and maintained certain Homecoming traditions, it has also moved forward across the century, finding new ways to celebrate pride in the institution, its students and alumni. Innovations that have sprung up over the years include the parade, pep rally, Homecoming Court, tent parties and many additional campus activities.

The annual Robert N. Murrell Oratorical Contest will officially kick off Homecoming week on Sunday, Sept. 21 beginning at 3 p.m. in the Robert N. Murrell Forum in the Floyd Payne Campus Center. The Gospel Concert rounds out the evening, beginning at 6 p.m. in Kean Hall in the Floyd Payne Campus Center.

HC6Student events highlight Monday, Sept. 22 when the Courtyard Show takes place in Welton Plaza starting at 11 a.m., followed by the Battle of the Residence Halls at 7 p.m. in the Floyd Payne Campus Center Keane Hall gymnasium.

The All-White Glow Tent party will take place on Tuesday, Sept. 23 in Welton Plaza beginning at 7 p.m. The Coronation for Miss TSU and Mr. TSU takes place Wednesday, Sept. 24 in Kean Hall. Wednesday’s activities conclude with the non-Greek organizations’ Yard Show beginning at 9 p.m. in the Averitte Amphitheater.

Homecoming continues Thursday, Sept. 25 with the Agriculture and Home Economics Hall of Fame Banquet and Induction Ceremony at the Farrell-Westbrook Complex at 7 p.m. A Homecoming concert in the Gentry Complex starts at 7 p.m. and features August Alsina and Juicy J. Hosted by Lil Duval. Tickets are $15 in advance or $20 at the door for the general public. The evening concludes with the Alumni White-Out Mixer at the Sheraton Music City Hotel Ballroom.

HC1Friday, Sept. 25 kicks off with the traditional Charles Campbell Fish Fry at 11 a.m. on the President’s Lawn, followed by Pep Rally at 11:30 in Hale Stadium. The TSU National Pan-Hellenic Step Show begins at 5 p.m. at the Gentry Complex. Hosted by actress LisaRaye, tickets are $10 for students in advance, $15 at the door.

The evening concludes with the “Evening of Honors” Scholarship Reception and Gala beginning at 6 p.m. at the Music City Center. The night will honor TSU football great and Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee, Claude Humphrey, and Honors program educators Drs. McDonald and Jamye Williams, who have made advancing education and student success a priority during their more than 30 years at TSU. The evening will also address the needs of students to make sure they have the proper funding to acquire a college education to pursue their career goals and aspirations.

Saturday, Sept. 27 starts with the Homecoming Parade beginning at 9 a.m., followed by the Showcase of Bands at noon at Hale Stadium. The Homecoming football game between TSU and FAMU kicks off at 6 p.m. at LP Field.

View the 2014 Schedule and the campus map. For more information, contact the Office of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving at 615.963.5381.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Atlanta Falcons

Tennessee State University Pride Celebrated as TSU Great Claude Humphrey Enters the Pro Foot Ball Hall of Fame

Claude Humphrey
After nearly 30 years, TSU great Claude Humphrey took his rightful place in the NFL Hall of Fame Saturday, Aug. 2 in Canton, Ohio. (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – “TSU Pride” was front and center Saturday in Canton, Ohio, when Tiger great Claude Humphrey was enshrined into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in front of thousands of spectators including family members, friends and Tennessee State University fans lead by President Glenda Glover.

“This is the proudest day in my life,” Dr. Glover said of the induction of her fellow Memphis, Tennessee, hometown native. “This very well deserved tribute to Claude Humphrey is beyond measure. I am just too proud to see this former Tiger and a product of Memphis, where I am from to be enshrined into the Hall of Fame.”

TSU President Glenda Glover (center) welcomes TSU great Claude Humphrey (left)  to the NFL Hall of Fame Saturday, Aug. 2.  Humphrey is the second TSU Tiger enshrined into the Hall, including Richard Dent (right) Class of 2011. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)
TSU President Glenda Glover (center) welcomes TSU great Claude Humphrey (left) to the NFL Hall of Fame Saturday, Aug. 2. Humphrey is the second TSU Tiger enshrined into the Hall, including Richard Dent (right) Class of 2011. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“I have so many mixed emotions right now,” Humphrey said, as he received and unveiled his bust that will be displayed in the Hall of Fame Museum alongside many other football greats before him. “I didn’t expect to get here, but I am sure glad that I did.”

Humphrey’s induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame is the second for a former Tiger, and it comes just three years after fellow defensive lineman Richard Dent was enshrined in 2011.

WATCH the complete acceptance speech OR READ the transcript

While many said Humphrey’s induction was long overdue, coming 33 years after he left the game, others saw it as a special moment for Historically Black Colleges and Universities, with the enshrinement of three HBCU graduates on the same day. Michael Strahan, a graduate of Texas Southern University, as well as Aeneas Williams, from Southern University, were also inducted alongside Humphrey.

“I am so happy for Claude, and it really speaks to the type of program we had at Tennessee State, having two players in the Hall of Fame,” said Dent, of his fellow Tiger. “It was a long-time coming, but well-deserved.”

Humphrey, Strahan and Williams were three of seven to be inducted on Saturday, joining Derrick Brooks, Ray Guy, Walter Jones and Andre Reed.

Humphrey adresses the crowd during his enshrinement ceremony into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Humphrey played for TSU as a defensive tackle from 1964 through 1967, and played 13 seasons in the NFL for the Atlanta Falcons and Philadelphia Eagles. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)
Humphrey adresses the crowd during his enshrinement ceremony into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Humphrey played for TSU as a defensive tackle from 1964 through 1967, and played 13 seasons in the NFL for the Atlanta Falcons and Philadelphia Eagles. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

In his 30-minute speech, Humphrey paid tribute to his alma mater, making special references to President Glover for being present at the enshrinement, and his former coach, the late John Merritt, whom he described as “the greatest coach in black college football.”

“A lot of recruiters came to visit me, but none like John Merritt,” Humphrey said of his former coach and collegiate playing career. “To me, he was the greatest. We lost a total of five games in four years.”

Humphrey, the former Atlanta Falcon, who retired with the Philadelphia Eagles, was a three-time All-American defensive tackle at TSU from 1964 to 1967. He ended his collegiate career as the all-time leader in sacks at TSU with 39. He is tied for second behind Lamar Carter along with fellow TSU legend Richard Dent.

Humphrey was selected in the first round of the 1968 NFL Draft going third overall to the Atlanta Falcons. During his rookie season in Atlanta, he was named AP Defensive Rookie of the Year.

Humphrey played 13 seasons in the NFL with the Atlanta Falcons (1968-74, 76-77) and the Philadelphia Eagles (1979-81).

While with Atlanta, he was named All-NFL or All-Pro eight times and was selected to the Pro Bowl on six different occasions.

Humphrey is only the second Falcon to be enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Ben Ray Harrell, ’70, a brother of Humphrey’s late wife Sandra, called the newly inductee “just an all over great guy.”

“This day is so fitting and could not have happened to a better person than Claude Humphrey,” said Harrell. “If there is anything that is missing here today is his wife not being here by his side. They loved each other very much.”

Nashville Councilman Howard Gentry ’74, ‘04, who presented a proclamation to Humphrey on behalf of the City Council, described the enshrinement as a fulfillment of former TSU President Walter Davis’ (1943-1968) dream for TSU to not just be recognized as a great sports program among “black schools,” but a great program compared to any in the nation.

“Claude’s induction and that of Richard Dent three years ago are an embodiment of that dream, and I couldn’t be prouder of their achievement” Gentry said.

Tony Wells ’92, president of the Tennessee State University National Alumni Association, like President Glover, said the enshrinement of Humphrey was a very proud moment for the whole TSU family.

“His mention of TSU, President Glover, and his days at the institution (during his speech) before the whole world was an indication of his pride and his appreciation for the preparation he received at the school,” said Wells. “I couldn’t be prouder as I am today.”

Dr. Reginald McDonald, Acting Band Director, waves to the crowd as the Aristocrat of Bands marches by during the Pro Football Hall of Fame parade in downtown Canton, Ohio Saturday, Aug. 2. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)
Dr. Reginald McDonald, Acting Band Director, waves to the crowd as the Aristocrat of Bands marches by during the Pro Football Hall of Fame parade in downtown Canton, Ohio Saturday, Aug. 2. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Also toting the “TSU Pride” was the University’s 290-member marching show band, the Aristocrat of Bands, which put up a crowd-pleasing performance to thunderous, continuous cheers during the Pro Football Hall of Fame Parade in downtown Canton Saturday. The band also put up another non-stop cheering, eight-minute performance during the half-time show of the nationally televised Hall of Fame game between the New York Giants and the Buffalo Bills at Fawcett Stadium.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Highlights Degree Programs and Other Positive Initiatives as University Hosts Metro Guidance Counselors

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Dr. Michael Harris, Dean of the College of Public Service and Urban Affairs, speaks to guidance counselors from the Metro Nashville Public Schools about offerings and programs in his college. Dr. Harris and his fellow deans took turns to present to the counselors during their (counselors) one-day in-service training on the Tennessee State University campus. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)


NASHVILLE, Tenn.
(TSU News Service) – The cost of quality education at Tennessee State University is affordable, nearly 85 percent of students get employment immediately after graduation, and a high number of graduates are accepted in graduate schools.

Those were some of the good news items TSU deans, admissions officials and staff shared with more than 90 Metro Nashville Public Schools guidance counselors during a meeting on campus Wednesday.

Since the counselors serve as a direct link between the schools and the University, the goal was to encourage them to steer their students and potential graduates toward post-secondary education at TSU, said Dr. John Cade, interim vice president for Enrollment Management and Student Support Services.

“We offer an affordable quality education that prepares our students with the necessary skills and competencies to be successful,” the deans said, as each gave brief descriptions and uniqueness of offerings and programs in their college.

Cade announced that starting this fall, TSU will offer incoming freshmen and sophomores block scheduling and the digital book bundle, initiatives, he said, that are intended to help with cost-cutting, retention and graduation.

He told the counselors that nearly 500 of potential incoming freshmen for the fall semester were from metro schools.

“We look forward to admitting all of them,” he said as he acquainted the counselors with University programs and processes from registration requirements, and tuition and fees to scholarship opportunities.

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Dwight Martin, right, of the College of Engineering at Tennessee State University, talks to visitors about offerings in his college during a meeting of high school guidance counselors on the TSU campus. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The architectural engineering program in the College of Engineering – one of only 20 in the nation – and a flight school program, one of only two in Tennessee, were among programs announced by the deans for their uniqueness.

Additionally, a global education offering that exposes students to the world around them through travel and study-abroad initiatives is just one of the many good reasons why “TSU is the go-to school,” the counselors were told.

With more than half of the counselors former TSU students and graduates in several disciplines, the message about the quality of the University’s education was easy to get across.

Dr. Barbara Mullins, school counselor for Freshman Academy at John Overton High School, who earned her doctorate from TSU, said the quality of a TSU education is comparable to the best anywhere.

“When I talk to students about TSU, I talk about the ‘TSU experience’ because I know about it first-hand,” Mullins said. “More than anything else, the personal care that comes with getting an education at TSU really stands out.”

Mullins also has a daughter who is a graduate of TSU.

In a brief remark, Dr. Nicole Cobb, MNPS director of Schools Counseling Services, lauded the long-standing relationship between TSU and the metro schools.

“We are really grateful for this partnership; we don’t take it for granted,” Cobb said, thanking Dr. Cade and Dr. Gregory Clark, director of Alumni Outreach and High School Relations for their support. “Dr. Clark and his admissions counselors, just as today, have always done a great job helping us during our training workshop here at TSU.”

“We have to support each other,” Gregory added about the relationship between TSU and MNPS. “We want them to send their students to us and we want them to continue hiring our graduates.”

This trend has taken roots in many ways, as TSU remains a key pipeline to recruiting metro and area teachers.  Recent reports show that for the past two years, TSU has been one of the top teacher preparation programs in the state, providing exceptionally qualified candidates for teaching positions not only across the state and the southern region, but right here in the University’s backyard with MNPS.

In 2012, 52 of the 553 new hires were from TSU, placing the University in the number one spot, with MTSU coming in a close second with 50 hires. Lipscomb, Trevecca and Vanderbilt came in at third, fourth and fifth, respectively.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU, Rep. Harold Love Jr. to Host Community Back-to-School Fest August 2

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – With the start of school less than two weeks away, organizers of a back-to-school festival want to make sure students and parents are prepared for the first full week of classes.

The 2nd Annual Love’s Healthy Start Festival presented by Tyson Foods KNOW Hunger Nashville Campaign, a back-to-school community event sponsored by Tennessee State Representative Harold Love Jr., will feature information from several local organizations including Tennessee State University, and provide supplies, resources and tips for those headed back to school. The event takes place Saturday, Aug. 2, at Hadley Park from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m.

Called a day of free family fun, organizers say Love’s Healthy Start Fest is “a hands-on way for the community to rally around educational success, physical health and safe communities” for Nashville’s children and youth. It will include a health fair, free backpacks and school supply giveaways, free food and drinks, and a variety of live music and vocal performances by local entertainers of all ages.

According to State Representative Harold Love Jr., who is organizing the event, more than 500 children and their parents attended the festival last year and hopes this year’s event is even bigger.

“We had tremendous success last year due to the collaboration from all the participants,” said Rep. Love. “We distributed 1,000 backpacks with school supplies and will due the same this year.”

Love went onto say how important the Festival is to both school-age children and the community.

“Our students and their families need to have a great start to their school year and I believe that providing free school supplies helps,” he added. “Our families also need to get their health screenings as often as they can so that they can maintain healthy lifestyles. And finally, students and their families need to be informed about educational services that are available from both the public and private sector.”

The festival is part of the larger Children’s Sabbath/Weekend of Hope four-day event with Casey Family Programs, Children’s Defense Fund, and the Urban League of Middle Tennessee. A Weekend of Hope is a weekend of activities carried out by houses of worship, interfaith partnerships, civic organizations, philanthropic entities or community organizations, and the weekend includes a community dialogue, a day of service, and a day of honor and recognition. The purpose of these events is to have these organizations be a catalyst for community dialogue and action around strengthening families and making communities a safer place for families and children to live and prosper.

During the Healthy Start Festival, representatives from the TSU departments of Nursing and Dental Hygiene, including students, will conduct health screenings to include height and weight measurement, blood pressure check, glucose testing, dental screening, patient education on brushing and flossing, toothpaste and toothbrush giveaways, and coupons for free cleaning for children in the TSU Dental Hygiene Clinic.

Along with health screenings, the Center for Prevention Research will offer information on tobacco cessation, as well as the College of Agriculture, Natural and Human Sciences providing workshops and discussions on nutrition and agriculture and more.

Along with TSU, other sponsors and key collaborators in the Love’s Healthy Start Fest are Mount Carmel Baptist Church, the Urban League of Middle Tennessee, Jack and Jill of America, 3rd with Goals, and Tyson Foods’ KNOW Hunger Nashville.

For more information call 615.741.3831.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Admissions Staff, Deans, Administrators to Engage MNPS Guidance Counselors During 1-Day Campus Gathering

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University admissions counselors, deans and administrators will have an opportunity Wednesday, July 23, to engage Metro Nashville Public Schools guidance counselors about offerings and programs at the University.

The MNPS high school counselors, about 90 of them, will meet on the TSU campus for their mandatory In-Service Training, which is held prior to the first day of school each year.

The training will be held from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. in the Ferrell-Westbrook Complex (The Barn) on the main campus.

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TSU officials: Dr. Gregory Clark, Director of Alumni Outreach and High School Relations, left; President Glenda Glover; and Dr. John Cade, Interim Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Support Services, far right, meet with Dr. Nicole Cobb, MNPS Director of Schools Counseling Services, during the guidance counselors’ in-service training on the TSU campus last year. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

According to Dr. Gregory Clark, director of Alumni Outreach and High School Relations at TSU, the yearly meeting of the city’s guidance counselors provides the University an excellent opportunity to showcase its offerings and to help foster working relations between the guidance counselors and the Office of Admissions and Recruitment.

“We also see this gathering as a way to engage with the high school guidance counselors in a collaboration that exposes them to our offerings,” added Dr. John Cade, interim vice president for Enrollment Management and Student Support Services. “We find this to be very rewarding for Metro (Metro Nashville Public Schools) and Tennessee State University.”

During portions of the training, the various colleges at the University will display their academic programs, while deans will be given up to five minutes each to pitch their offerings.

For more information contact Dr. Clark at 615-963-5103 or gclark@tnstate.edu.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

2014 Small Farms Expo Highlights State’s Agricultural Diversity and Continuing Expansion of TSU’s Research and Cooperative Extension Program

 

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Dr. Chandra Reddy, Dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, left, along with Franklin County Extension Agent John Ferrell, far right, presents the Tennessee Small Farmer of the Year Award to John Ingle and his wife Bobbie at the 2014 Small Farms Expo at Tennessee State University. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – From beekeeping in Franklin County to crop growing in Williamson County, and 4-H and adult agriculture in Bledsoe County, the 2014 Tennessee State University Small Farms Expo Thursday highlighted the diversity in the state’s vast agricultural industry.

Participation in the Expo also showcased the University’s wide outreach initiatives through its Cooperative Extension Program, now covering more than 50 counties across Tennessee.

“This yearly Expo and TSU’s extension effort really give farmers an opportunity to educate the public about what we are doing out there,” said John Ingle, a Franklin County cattle breeder, who was this year’s Small Farmer of the Year Award winner. “Consumers only see the beef but it takes a lot more effort to get it to their dining room tables.”

As seasoned farmers, producers and University researchers, faculty and staff engaged the nearly 400 visitors with various displays and exhibitions, school children – from elementary to high school – considered potential future farmers of America, also got the opportunity to learn about agriculture.

Cierra Williams, a 10th grade student from Blackman High School in Murfreesboro, Tennessee and a 4-H volunteer in Rutherford County, participates with other students in teambuilding and leadership exercises at the 2014 Small Farms Expo at Tennessee State University on Thursday, July 17. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)
Cierra Williams, left, a 10th grade student from Blackman High School in Murfreesboro, Tennessee and a 4-H volunteer in Rutherford County, participates with other students in teambuilding and leadership exercises at the 2014 Small Farms Expo at Tennessee State University on Thursday, July 17. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Accompanied by chaperons and TSU staff, the children, who came in several busloads from the surrounding counties, took part in tours and educational workshops and hands-on activities including teamwork and leadership exercises, and demonstrations in alternative fuel production and technology.

“Coming here today was really eye-opening for me,” said future medical doctor Cierra Williams, a 10th grader from Murfreesboro, Tennessee, who wants to major in biology when she enters college.

Although Williams volunteers with the 4-H program in Rutherford County, through intermediate cooking and camp activities, she has never been on a farm before, and did not know TSU had a farm and a vast agricultural program.

“I am really excited to see this part of the university and to learn about these farm animals and plants,” she said. “Even though we might not think about it now, the team-building and leadership exercises today could be very helpful in the future in job interviews and other career efforts.”

The Expo, held at the Agricultural Research and Education Center on the main campus, also featured research and discussions on efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in corn croplands, enhancing sustainable production of bioenergy crops, pigeon pea production for limited resources farmers of Tennessee, and enhancing plant protection against fungal diseases and environmental stresses.

Workshops included organic vegetable production techniques, pesticide handling and safety, food preservation, new equipment technologies for small producers, and soil and plant tissue sampling, among others.

The highlight of the Expo was recognition of the state’s top four farmers for various awards. An overall winner was selected for the Small Farmer of the Year Award. That honor went to Ingle, of Cowan, Tennessee, who promotes a 100-percent green technology in cattle breeding and beef production. He was first recognized for “Best Management Practices.”

The other three award winners were Chris Hampton, a beef cattle farmer in Celina, Tenn., “Innovative Marketing,” for better recordkeeping that helps to meet customers’ need; Leigh Funderburk, of Franklin, Tennessee, “Innovative Marketing”; and Billy McCraw, of Clarksville, Tennessee, who received the award for “Alternative Enterprise.”

In presenting the awards, Dr. Chandra Reddy, Dean of the College of Agriculture, assisted by University officials, and Tennessee Agriculture Commissioner Julius Johnson, congratulated the honorees, and the institution and agency representatives for the support and cooperation in making the Expo a success.

“This could not have been possible without your partnership and cooperation,” Reddy told the packed luncheon on the TSU farm. He spoke about the “remarkable” growth in the college, especially its Extension program making special reference to head Expo organizer, Dr. Latif Lighari, Associate Dean for Extension, for “yet another” successful Expo.

Latif, who has headed the Expo since its inception 10 years ago, recognized his fellow organizers, the various farm managers and research leaders, small farmers, schools and students for their participation.

“Your input and participation made this event very successful,” Lighari said. “We thank you and especially the small farmers who are the lifeline of what we do.”

Other speakers included TSU Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dr. Alisa Mosley; State Sen. Thelma Harper, State Rep. Harold Love Jr., Agriculture Commissioner Johnson; and Dr. Tim Cross, Dean of Extension at the University of Tennessee.

Other TSU partners, Expo organizers, and agencies and sponsors present were the Tennessee Farm Bureau, U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Farm Service Agency, and the Tennessee Wildlife Resource Agency.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

2014 TSU Small Farms Expo and Farmer of the Year Recognition Expected to Draw More than 400 on July 17

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NASHVILLE (TSU News Service) – About 400 agricultural experts, farmers and officials from across Tennessee are expected to attend this year’s Small Farms Expo and Small Farmer of the Year Recognition program at Tennessee State University.

The Expo, hosted by the TSU College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences Cooperative Extension Program, opens on Thursday, July 17, at the Agricultural Research and Education Center on the main campus.

Sponsors include the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Tennessee Department of Agriculture, University of Tennessee Extension, the Tennessee Farm Bureau, the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the Farm Services Bureau, among others.

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Hydroponic farming, the process of producing crop without the benefit of water, was one of the major highlights of the 2013 Small Farms Expo. Here graduate students explain the process to visitors during the exhibition. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Featured research and discussions will focus on efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in corn croplands, enhancing sustainable production of bioenergy crops, pigeon pea production for limited resources farmers of Tennessee, and enhancing plant protection against fungal diseases and environmental stresses. Workshops will include organic vegetable production techniques, pesticide handling and safety, honey production and extraction techniques, new equipment technologies for small producers, and soil and plant tissue sampling, among others.

How to fund your operation, the do’s and don’ts of organizing and managing a community garden, as well as how small farmers can move their operation into the Internet age will also be discussed.

According to organizers, the Expo will be highlighted by the Small Farmer Recognition and Award ceremony that will include the President of TSU, Dr. Glenda Glover; Commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Agriculture, Julius Johnson; the President of the Tennessee Farm Bureau Federation, Dr. Tim Cross; and Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Resources.

More details on the Expo can be found at http://www.tnstate.edu/extension/smallfarmexpo.aspx

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.