Category Archives: EVENTS

Sexual Assault, Relationship Violence Focus of Two-Day Summit at Tennessee State University

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Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover addresses participants at a two-day summit on sexual assault on college campus, during opening ceremonies in Poag Auditorium on the main campus. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)


NASHVILLE
(TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover Tuesday welcomed more than 400 representatives from 76 universities, colleges and organizations across the state to a two-day summit on campus sexual assault.

The summit, featuring national experts on sexual assault prevention and complying with changing federal laws, includes customized tracks for campus police, student support services providers, and Title IX investigators.

The Tennessee Board of Regents, the Tennessee Independent Colleges and Universities Association, and the University of Tennessee System, in partnership with the Tennessee Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence, are sponsoring the summit.

“We are especially delighted and honored that you selected Tennessee State University for this all important summit,” President Glover said, as she presented TBR Chancellor John Morgan. “Sexual assault is a very serious issue, and every member of our campus community has a responsibility to not only know how to prevent it, but also how to respond to it.”

Dr. Glover thanked the summit planners and facilitators from across the state, including the TSU offices of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action, and Student Affairs for their contributions.

“Your contribution to this gathering is well noted. Your efforts demonstrate that we must be ready to take every step necessary to support our students when they need us,” the President added.

According to the TBR, the summit also solidifies a partnership between the state’s higher education community and Tennessee’s leading private, non-profit sexual assault coalition.

“Through the development and implementation of effective prevention and awareness programs and campaigns, the statewide partnership will enhance the efforts of Tennessee’s higher education institutions to focus on student safety at all levels,” a TBR release stated.

The summit covers topics ranging from “Domestic and Dating Violence 101” to bystander intervention and the psychological and biological effects of sexual assaults.

Keynote speakers include: Katie Koestner, executive director of the Take Back the Night Foundation and Campus Outreach Services and the first survivor of acquaintance rape to speak out nationally. Others include S. Daniel Carter, director of the 32 National Campus Safety Initiative formed by the families of the victims and survivors of the Virginia Tech tragedy; Connie Kirkland, director of sexual assault services at Northern Virginia Community College and contributing author of the 2014 NCAA guide “Addressing Sexual Assault and Interpersonal Violence,” Jim Hopper, consultant and instructor of psychology at Harvard Medical School specializing in the psychological and biological effects of sexual assault and serving on the congressionally-mandated Peace Corps Sexual Assault Advisory Council, and Kayce Matthews, program specialist with the Tennessee Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence.

The summit concludes on Wednesday.

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Tennessee State University Announces Black History Month Events

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University announced today a schedule of events for Black History Month beginning in February. Students, staff, faculty, alumni and members of the public are invited to attend all events.

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TSU 2015 Black History Month Schedule of Events
The University will hold a series of compelling activities to celebrate cultural diversity at TSU and recognize the contributions of African-Americans during the month of February as the nation observes Black History Month. This American history is one all can celebrate as we recognize the achievements and significant roles African-Americans, in collaboration with so many others, have played in shaping the country.

Upcoming program and events include lectures, history and culture conference, panel discussions, and musical and theatrical performances. The University will also hold its annual Day on the Capital Feb. 10, and African-American History and Culture conference Feb. 13. Events are free, unless noted, and open to the public.

For more information, call the Office of Media Relations at 615.963.5331 or communications@tnstate.edu.

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

NEWS BLOG_Ron Cobbs

Tennessee State University Alum and NASA Engineer Receives Director’s Commendation Award for Outstanding Contribution

NASA Johnson Space Center Director, Dr. Ellen Ochoa, right; and Deputy Director Kirk Shireman, left, congratulate Ron Cobbs after presenting him with the NASA-JSC Director’s Commendation Award, during a ceremony recently in the Teague Auditorium at the center.
NASA Johnson Space Center Director, Dr. Ellen Ochoa, right; and Deputy Director Kirk Shireman, left, congratulate Ron Cobbs after presenting him with the NASA-JSC Director’s Commendation Award, during a ceremony recently in the Teague Auditorium at the center. (Courtesy photo)


NASHVILLE, Tenn.
(TSU News Service) – A Tennessee State University alumnus and NASA engineer has been recognized for outstanding contribution to the agency.

Ron Cobbs, a 1989 TSU graduate with a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering and avionics chief engineer assigned to the International Space Station operations, recently received the NASA Johnson Space Center Director’s Commendation Award.

The award, the highest honor given by the NASA-JSC administrator, recognizes the center’s civil servants with “significant” contribution toward the mission and operations of the JSC.

Last year, Cobbs’ input was helpful in identifying the cause of a space suit malfunction during a spacewalk in July. Although Cobbs was not part of the official Extravehicular Mobility Unit (space suit) investigating team, he was asked to “look into” the situation because the problem “appeared to be electrical.”

Ron Cobbs, International Space Station Avionics Chief Engineer and TSU graduate, helped NASA engineers identify the cause of a serial interface issue with a spacesuit that malfunctioned during a spacewalk on July 16. (courtesy photo)
Ron Cobbs, International Space Station Avionics Chief Engineer and TSU graduate, helped NASA engineers identify the cause of a serial interface issue with a spacesuit that malfunctioned during a spacewalk on July 16, 2013. (courtesy photo)

“I discovered that the problem was a systems problem relative to operational use of the serial port on the laptop side of the suit,” said Cobbs, after investigating the problem. As a result of his findings and recommendation, the procedures for the astronauts were rewritten and retested, subsequently leading to identifying the problem.

Saying that he is “deeply honored” to receive the Administrator’s Award from NASA-JSC, Cobbs, who has been with NASA for nearly 30 years, credits his parents and his TSU preparation for his career success.

“My parents always taught me to work hard and always do the right thing,” said Cobbs, who also holds a master’s degree in Space Engineering from Stevens Institute of Technology. “They taught me to believe in myself, have faith and shoot for the moon.”

Shooting for the moon is what Cobbs has been doing since. As avionics chief engineer, his role is to ensure that engineers in the NASA Directorate adhere to the “right processes.” He also supports project managers during the design, development, test and evaluation of projects that require electronics and/or software for operational use.

“I also support Failure Investigation Teams whenever their failures or anomalies on the Space Station need to be resolved. I also sit on several Space Station program boards to provide concurrence representing engineering on all proposed forward plans and action that will be implemented,” Cobbs noted.

“Ronald Cobbs is a true example of an electrical engineering graduate with passion for life-long learning and professional growth,” Dr. Satinderpaul Singh Devgan, professor and head of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, said of his former student, when information came out about Cobbs’ spacesuit malfunction intervention.

Cobbs joined NASA at the Johnson Space Center immediately after graduating TSU. He has moved through the ranks from design engineer, systems engineer to now ISS avionics chief engineer.

“I think Ron Cobbs’ achievement at NASA is a great story,” added Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College of Engineering.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU’s Roy Bullock inducted into George Washington Carver Public Service Hall of Fame

Dr. Roy Bullock
Dr. Roy Bullock

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A professor from Tennessee State University has been recognized for his public service and contributions to the rural farming community. Dr. Roy Bullock, professor of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, received the accolades when he was inducted into the George Washington Carver Public Service Hall of Fame.

The public service award, presented to Bullock December 7, is given to those individuals whose work mirrors the philosophy of world-recognized scholar George Washington Carver – “the greatest good for the greatest number of people.”

The award recognizes teaching and research accomplishments that improve the quality of life for clientele served by land-grant institutions such as Tennessee State University. The award ceremony is part of the annual Professional Agricultural Workers Conference in Tuskegee, Alabama.

Bullock is the first recipient of the prestigious award from Tennessee State University and the first in the state. The award was first presented in 1984.

“This is a great honor to receive this distinction,” said Bullock, who also serves as the Extension state program leader for Agriculture and Natural Resources. “Very few people have received this award.”

Dr. Latif Lighari, associate dean for Extension in the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, expressed pride in and gratitude for Bullock’s many years of service to the college and the farming community.

“This is a great honor for the TSU Cooperative Extension Program to have one of our senior faculty recognized with this prestigious distinction,” Lighari said. “This recognition is given only to people with a remarkable record of success in extension, outreach and university engagement.”

As for the future, Bullock says that he is focused on spending the rest of his career focusing on rebuilding the farming population, which is vital to the nation’s future.

“We need to replenish the aging farmer with the young vibrant farmer through whatever means necessary,” he explained. “If farming fails, everything fails.”

Bullock, a graduate of Class VIII of the National Extension Leadership Development (NELD) Program, has written more than 30 Extension publications. In his current position, he provides leadership to county agents who focus on small farmers in all 95 Tennessee counties. He is a 2009 recipient of the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities’ Excellence in Extension Award, the Presidential Distinguished Service Award (2001), the University of Tennessee Program of Distinction Award for Small Farms (2004), the Blue and White Gala Award for Outstanding Program in Small Farms (2006), and the Award of Excellence for Exceptional Programming for Southern Regional Extension Forestry (2006).

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

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To Succeed, Learn to Keep Pace with Fast-Changing World, TSU Commencement Speaker Tells More than 500 Graduates

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President Glenda Glover presents a plaque of appreciation to Shannon A. Brown, Senior Vice President and Chief Human Resource and Diversity Officer at FedEx Express, who served as the keynote speaker for the fall commencement at TSU.


NASHVILLE, Tenn.
(TSU News Service) – Saying that today’s fast-changing world requires people who can adapt, Tennessee State University fall commencement speaker told nearly 500 graduates Saturday that to be successful they must be ready to “run when the sun comes up,” to keep pace.

“Today’s reality is that the world is changing faster,” said Shannon Brown, senior vice president and chief human resource and diversity officer at FedEx Express. “Economies and their enterprises are moving at a very fast pace and people who are slow to adapt will be left behind.”

Brown, recognized by Black Enterprise magazine as one of the “100 Most Powerful Executives in Corporate America,” paralleled his remarks to the “gazelle” and the “lion” in Christopher McDougal’s book, “Ready to Run,” where the gazelle must outrun the fastest lion or be killed, or the lion must run faster than the slowest gazelle or it will starve.

“It doesn’t matter whether you are the lion or the gazelle, when the sun comes up, you better be running,” said the FedEx executive, who, in 30 years, worked his way from a package handler to become one of the top executives at the world’s largest express transport company.

He said in a fast-track world with constant technological advances and changes that have revolutionized all aspects of industry and human thinking, people who are slow to catch on and prepare for the future will be left behind.

He applauded the graduates for their determination to complete their university journey, urging them to use that same determination to press their way forward.

“As you enter this fast changing world, surround yourselves with good mentors; they can help you make the transition from one environment to the other; don’t be afraid to step out of your comfort zone; and commit to being lifelong learners,” Brown told the graduates.

The Memphis, Tennessee, native who said his job as the highest ranking human resource and diversity officer at FedEx is to keep employees engaged and satisfied, named charisma, individual consideration, intellectual stimulation, courage, dependability, flexibility, judgment and respect for others as “time-tested” leadership principles that will keep them competitive in their chosen fields.

“It is about believing that every individual brings value to the table; and do not forget to give back to the community,” Brown added.

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President Glenda Glover congratulates Leatrice Medina for receiving the Academic Excellence Award. The award is given to a graduating senior with the highest GPA of 4.0 among her classmates. Medina received her degree in Psychology.

TSU President Glenda Glover, herself a Memphis native, thanked Brown for what she called, “a thought-provoking” speech, and congratulated the graduates for their accomplishment.

“You have endured and prepared yourself to reach this goal which may have seemed unattainable, but you stuck with it,” Dr. Glover said. “You must always remember that you did not accomplish this goal all by yourselves. There were parents, relatives, friends and mentors who helped you along the way. Remember to thank them.”

More than 500 graduates received degrees in various disciplines at the ceremony in the Gentry Center Complex. Among officials who attended the program was Dr. Wendy Thompson, vice chancellor for Organizational Effectiveness and Strategic Initiatives, at the Tennessee Board of Regents.

Top FedEx Exec to Give Commencement Address at Tennessee State University Fall Graduation Ceremony Dec. 13

Shannon Brown - Larger Photo
Shannon A. Brown


NASHVILLE, Tenn.
(TSU News Service) – In more than 30 years Shannon A. Brown worked his way up from a package handler to one of the top corporate ranks at FedEx Express. He has been named to Black Enterprise magazine’s list of “100 Most Powerful Executives in Corporate America.”

On Saturday, Dec. 13, Brown, senior vice president and chief HR and Diversity officer at the world’s largest express transport company, will share his vast knowledge and experience in leadership and how to succeed in corporate America, when he delivers the commencement address at Tennessee State University’s fall graduation in the Gentry Center complex.

More than 400 undergraduate and graduate candidates will receive their degrees in various disciplines at the ceremony, which begins at 9 a.m.

As the most senior human resources executive for FedEx Express, Brown provides strategic direction for all human resources practices, policies and operations for the company of more than 160,000 team members, providing fast and reliable delivery to every U.S. address and more than 220 countries and territories.

His rise to the senior executive level at FedEx is a result of his continued demonstration of exceptional leadership qualities and a strong commitment to service. During his tenure, FedEx has consistently been ranked on Fortune magazine’s list of the “World’s Most Admired Companies” and Black Enterprise magazine’s “40 Best Companies for Diversity.”

Brown, who also served as senior vice president of Human Resource for FedEx Ground, is a recipient of many accolades and recognitions. He was appointed by Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam to the University of Tennessee System Board of Trustees and to the Advisory Board for Western Governors University. He also chairs the International Air Transport Association Human Capital Steering Group and serves on the University of Denver’s Board of Directors of the Intermodal Transportation Institute.

Among many other accolades, Brown, who resides in Memphis, Tennessee, was named Savoy magazine’s “Top 100 Most Influential Executives in Corporate America.” The Memphis Tri-State Defender newspaper named Brown one of “50 Men of Excellence,” and Black MBA magazine recognized him in its list of “Top 50 Under 50.”

As a result of his dedication to community service, Brown serves on many civic and institutional boards, including the Board of Trustees of the Lausanne Collegiate School, and the Board of the United Way of Mid-South, which he chairs. He previously served as March of Dimes Executive Champion, and received the Crystal Award from the Association of Fundraising Professionals Foundation for Philanthropy. Brown is a recipient of the National-Louis University Distinguished Alumni Award and was inducted into the Memphis City Schools Alumni Hall of Fame.

Brown holds a bachelor’s degree from National-Louis University in Chicago, and a master’s degree from the University of Denver.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Students present research at State Counseling Association’s Annual Conference

Psychology students from TSU had the opportunity to present their research to professional school counselors from around the state during the Tennessee Counseling Association’s annual conference. Nine of the 17 students presenting included  (L-R) Avis Littleton, Jemeika Houston, Tasia Thompson,Dr.  Jeri Lee, associate professor of psychology, Molly Craig, A.J. Furnish, Joye Duvall, Thurman Webb, assistant professor of psychology, Martha Jones, Tori Adams, and Tara Carmichael. (courtesy photo)
Psychology students from TSU had the opportunity to present their research to professional school counselors from around the state during the Tennessee Counseling Association’s annual conference. Nine of the 17 students presenting included (L-R) Avis Littleton, Jemeika Houston, Tasia Thompson,Dr. Jeri Lee, associate professor of psychology, Molly Craig, A.J. Furnish, Joye Duvall, Thurman Webb, assistant professor of psychology, Martha Jones, Tori Adams, and Tara Carmichael. (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Seventeen students from Tennessee State University had the opportunity recently to present their research to professional school counselors from around the state during the Tennessee Counseling Association’s annual conference. Held in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, the conference provided training and professional activities for school counselors and other mental health providers, as well as psychology graduate student research poster presentations.

Students from TSU presented their school counseling program evaluation research posters that included Parental involvement in students’ academic careers; An evaluation of a fourth grade Response to Intervention program; and Program evaluation of the implementation of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program in a high risk elementary school.

“TCA offers an excellent opportunity my students at TSU to bridge the gap between student classroom research and the actual practical research demanded by today’s schools as a result of an emphasis on evidence-based practice,” said Dr. Jeri Lee, coordinator of professional school counseling at TSU and co-chair of the TCA graduate poster committee and legislative liaison. “The students seemed to appreciate the opportunity to discuss important research findings with other professionals.”

Tennessee State was one of 11 universities presenting research posters during the association’s 57th annual conference. Other schools included Argosy University, Austin Peay State University, Carson-Newman University, East Tennessee State University, Lindsey Wilson College, Lipscomb University, The University of Memphis, Tennessee Technical University, Vanderbilt University and The University of Tennessee.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Helps Students Travel the World with Passport Fair

Monique Miller (left), a sophomore Nursing major at Tennessee State University, discusses the passport application process with Linda Coffield, passport specialist. The University held a special passport fair  to help make international travel easier for students, faculty and staff. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)
Monique Miller (left), a sophomore Nursing major at Tennessee State University, discusses the passport application process with Linda Coffield, passport specialist. The University held a special passport fair to help make international travel easier for students, faculty and staff. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The next time Monique Miller travels she hopes to hear the words, “may I see your passport please?”

The sophomore Nursing major at Tennessee State University was able to move one step closer to her goal Tuesday when she attended the University’s 3rd annual Passport Fair, where she submitted her application for the all-important travel document that will help her see the world.

Miller wants to travel to France, New Amsterdam and Berlin this summer to study developmental psychology and knew today’s passport fair would help move her along her way.

“Ever since I started here, I wanted to study abroad,” said the Indiana native. “The (passport) fair was convenient and they even waived some fees so it was the perfect time to get the process started.”

Now in its third year, the Passport Fair is a joint effort by the Student Government Association and the Office of Diversity and International Affairs, to help make international travel easier for students, faculty and staff. According to Mark Brinkley, director of International Education, acquiring a passport has been one of the biggest barriers to the study-abroad program and a reason the two organizations joined forces.

“We started this program three years ago when then SGA president, David Rowles, saw a need to help our students participate in study abroad programs,” said Brinkley. “We were able to work with the U.S. Department of State to bring the one-stop passport fair here to students so they really have no reason not to apply for one.”

Government officials traveled from South Carolina to the University this week specifically for the Passport Fair, and not only will help students here, but will also travel to Vanderbilt and Belmont universities as part of a joint venture.

“This is a first for any Tennessee Board of Regents institution and we’ve been able to help not only our students here at Tennessee State, but also some of our partner institutions,” added Brinkley. “We know our students are not the only ones who travel outside of the U.S. We want to help all global travelers, whether they be our students or our neighbors.”

Since the Passport Fair began in 2012, nearly 120 students have applied and received passports. Brinkley said he expects to help an additional 20-30 through this year’s fair.

“This truly is an opportunity for students to receive a cross-cultural experience through the study-abroad programs,” added Brinkley. “But the first step is getting the passport.”

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Office of Diversity and International Affairs at Tennessee State University Receives Grant to Strengthen Ties with Japan

University becomes one of the first HBCUs to receive funding through the Japan Foundation

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) –The Office of Diversity and International Affairs (DIA) at Tennessee State University has been awarded a $6,138 grant from the Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnerships to assist in strengthening its outreach and partnership with Japan. TSU is one of the first HBCUs to receive funding from the agency.

Motohiko Kato, Consulate General of Japan at Nashville
Motohiko Kato, Consul-General of Japan in Nashville

“We are very proud to be one of the first HBCUs to receive this grant and plan to engage in many more partnerships that allow our students the opportunity to experience education from a global perspective so that they are better prepared to meet the demands of our global world,” said Dr. Jewell Winn, DIA executive director. “TSU has always been committed to diversity and inclusion, and has opened our doors to all students desiring a quality education. We look forward to continuing to build partnerships that create strong academic and research opportunities for our students and faculty.”

The grant announcement comes at a great time for the University as it kicks off International Education Week November 10-15. The Japan Foundation has become more assertive in outreach to HBCUs. On Monday, Nov. 10, DIA will host the newly appointed Consul-General of Japan in Nashville, Motohiko Kato, at a luncheon. Discussions will focus on research, teaching, exchange and study-abroad opportunities for students and faculty members through the Japan Exchange and Teaching Program.

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“International Education Week is an opportunity to celebrate the benefits of education and exchange worldwide,” Winn said. “Tennessee State University is among the most diverse institutions in the Tennessee Board of Regents system and among HBCUs across the country, and these efforts allow us to showcase all the great things we have to offer not only to international students, but those here in the United States.”

Additionally, on Wednesday, Nov. 12, DIA will present the Ms. Collegiate International Pageant at 6 p.m. in Poag Auditorium. The pageant provides personal and professional opportunities for young women, and is the first such event offered on campus with the sole purpose of exposing the campus community to the beauty, opinions, talent and intelligence of young women from countries around the world. The pageant will have representations from Somalia, Saudi Arabia, India, the Dominican Republic, Iraq, Nigeria, Liberia, Jamaica, Laos and Panama. The winner will receive a book scholarship, along with other amenities and recognition as a campus leader representing international students. The event is free and open to the public.

On Thursday, Nov. 13, a Japanese cultural festival and exhibition will be held in Jane Elliott Hall on the main campus from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. Students from McGavock High School will participate in the festival as part of the University’s ongoing recruitment efforts. The week will conclude with joint activities with other area high schools and universities.

International Education Week began in 2000. It is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and the U.S. Department of Education. This annual observance is celebrated in November of each year across the United States and in more than 100 countries.

 

For more information on the Office of Diversity and International Affairs, call 615.963.4977.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.