Category Archives: Athletics

Memphis Graduating High School Senior with 213 College Offers, and More than $10 Million in Scholarships, to Attend TSU

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Meaghen Jones, a Memphis high school graduating senior who has been accepted to 213 colleges across the nation and has received more than $10 million in scholarship offers, is coming to the “Land of Golden Sunshine.” She will attend Tennessee State University this fall as a pre-med, TSU officials have announced.

TSU President Glenda Glover visited with Jones and her parents “to seal the deal.”

President Glenda Glover presents Meaghen Jones with an official TSU shirt. (Submitted photo)

In a teary statement before a cheering crowd, Jones announced, “My name is Meaghen Jones, and first I would like to thank God and my parents, my family, my friends and all who have supported me throughout my life. I have accumulated $10,776,400 in scholarships. My final choices for college were Tennessee State University and the University of Memphis. In fall 2018, I will be continuing my education at Tennessee State University.”

Jones, a Whitehaven High School academic standout, has a weighted 4.2 grade point average and an ACT score of 25. She is a member of the yearbook staff.

Jones is also part of the River City Dance Company, and attends the T.L. Williams Academy of Dance. At TSU, Jones says she plans to seek admission into the Honors College.

Jones comes to TSU as part of a millennial generation of high achieving students that the university continues to strategically recruit in its effort to improve retention and graduation rates.

In 2016, President Glover announced sweeping changes that raised admission standards to attract the best and brightest. Minimum requirement for incoming freshmen went up from a 2.25 GPA to 2.5, while the ACT score remained at 19.

Officials say in addition to academics, Jones’ future will be in good hands when she comes to TSU. Recent data comparison shows that the university is on an upward trajectory when it comes to job placement for new graduates.

Within three months of receiving their degrees, nearly 52 percent of students who graduated in December had received “some form of employment opportunities,” according to the Career Development Center. That’s just 6 percent shy of the national average of graduates who had jobs within six months of graduation, according to College Track, an online database that guides parents and students in college selection.

Last year, TSU received a $2 million career development grant from the United Negro College Fund. The money gave the Career Development Center staff the tools to prepare and ultimately help TSU students secure employment immediately upon graduation.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Congratulates Its Spring 2018 graduates

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Congratulations to Tennessee State University’s Spring 2018 graduates.

More than 1,000 students walked across the aisle at two separate Tennessee State University commencement ceremonies to receive their degrees in different disciplines. Both ceremonies took place in the Gentry Complex on the main campus.

TSU President Glenda Glover congratulated the graduates and parents for their achievement.

“This is your day,” Glover told the graduates. “We thank you, and we’re depending on you to continue the tradition of excellence.”

At the undergraduate commencement on Saturday, May 5, more than 800 graduates received their degrees after hearing from nationally recognized motivational speaker, Dr. Eric Thomas.

He told the graduates that each of them is born with greatness, but to achieve it requires work.

“Greatness is not free, it comes with a price tag,” said Thomas.

Among the graduates were the grandmother/granddaughter pair of Theresa Lyles, 68, and Zuri Lyles, 22, who received their bachelor’s degrees in sociology and health information management, respectively.

Also at the spring graduation, university officials posthumously presented degrees to the families of two students who died few months before they were to graduate. Bethany Morse, 34, a non-traditional student, died Feb. 2, 2018. Her bachelor’s degree was in social work. The other student, Denise McGarity Sampson, 22, died Nov. 27, 2017. She earned a bachelor’s degree in engineering.

On Friday, May 4, graduate students received their degrees after hearing inspiring words from Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms, who gave the commencement address.

Bottoms, an Atlanta native who became the 60th mayor of Atlanta last December and only the second woman to be elected mayor in Atlanta’s history, told the graduates not to be afraid to share their struggles, their “scars,” because they don’t know who may be inspired by them – especially in the case of youth.

“As you enter this next season of life, think of those little boys and little girls who need to hear your stories, and be uplifted by your stories,” said Bottoms. “How you graduated from TSU, and how you got to the other side.“

Between its graduate commencement and its undergraduate commencement, TSU graduated more than 1,000 students. And officials say a “substantial number” have already gotten job or internship offers.

Among them is Emmanuel Gyang of Nashville, who received his bachelor’s degree in engineering. He is heading to Bank of America in Dallas as a systems engineer in the company’s data center.

“I feel blessed to be graduating with a job with a company like Bank of America,” he said. “I owe it to TSU for the preparation I received in the classroom and from TSU’s Career Development Center. They definitely honed me to be the person I am today. They taught me how to carry myself in a more professional manner.”

Recent data comparison shows that TSU is on an upward trajectory when it comes to job placement for new graduates.

Within three months of receiving their degrees, nearly 52 percent of students who graduated in December had received “some form of employment opportunities,” according to the Career Development Center. That’s just 6 percent shy of the national average of graduates who had jobs within six months of graduation, according to College Track, an online database that guides parents and students in college selection.

Last year, TSU received a $2 million career development grant from the United Negro College Fund. The money gave the Career Development Center staff the tools to prepare and ultimately help TSU students secure employment immediately upon graduation.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Motivational Speaker Tells Tennessee State University Graduates That Achieving Greatness Requires Work

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s spring undergraduate commencement speaker told graduates that each of them is born with greatness, but to achieve it requires work.

TSU President Glenda Glover presents a plaque to spring undergraduate commencement, Dr. Eric Thomas. (Photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

“Greatness is not free, it comes with a price tag,” said nationally-recognized motivational speaker, Dr. Eric Thomas, as more than 800 graduates in different disciplines prepared to walk across the aisle to receive their degrees.

Among the graduates were the grandmother/granddaughter pair of Theresa Lyles, 68, and Zuri Lyles, 22, who received their bachelor’s degrees in sociology and health information management, respectively. Read their story at https://bit.ly/2I9rHon.

Also at the spring graduation, university officials posthumously presented degrees to the families of two students who died few months before they were to graduate. Bethany Morse, 34, a non-traditional student, died Feb. 2, 2018. Her bachelor’s degree was in social work. The other student, Denise McGarity Sampson, 22, died Nov. 27, 2017. She earned a bachelor’s degree in engineering.

Called the “Hip Hop Preacher” for his creative style and high-energy speeches, Thomas drove home his usual message on success that “when you want to succeed as bad as you want to breathe, then you’ll be successful.”

To Saturday’s graduates, Thomas said “work,” “think” and “service” are the greatest assets to achieving greatness.

President Glenda Glover posthumously presaents Denise McGarity Sampson’s degree to her family. McGarity, an engineering major, died Nov. 27, 2017. (Photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

“To activate the greatness in you, it requires you to work to achieve your dream,” he said. “Some days you might not feel like getting up but your dream will make you get up. …it will push you. With your education, you have an opportunity of a lifetime. Surround yourself with people who believe in your dream.”

Prior to Thomas’ speech, TSU President Glenda Glover congratulated the graduates and parents for their achievement.

“This is your day,” said Glover. “We thank you, and we’re depending on you to continue the tradition of excellence.”

Ra’Shunda Hackett, who received her bachelor’s degree in biology, said Thomas reiterated the lessons she learned at TSU.

“TSU’s motto is ‘Think, Work and Serve.’ This university was a dream school, and I am not disappointed that I chose to come here,” said Hackett, of Birmingham, Alabama, who came to TSU on a Presidential Scholarship. “I am extremely excited and thankful to the many at TSU who helped me along the way.”

Hackett, who serves as an AmeriCorps member with Impact America, will intern with Cigna, a global health insurance service company.

Between its graduate commencement, which took place Friday, and its undergraduate commencement, TSU graduated more than 1,000 students. And officials say a “substantial number,” like Hackett, have already gotten job or internship offers.

Among them is Emmanuel Gyang of Nashville, who received his bachelor’s degree in engineering. He is heading to Bank of America in Dallas as a systems engineer in the company’s data center.

“I feel blessed to be graduating with a job with a company like Bank of America,” he said. “I owe it to TSU for the preparation I received in the classroom and from TSU’s Career Development Center. They definitely honed me to be the person I am today. They taught me how to carry myself in a more professional manner.”

Recent data comparison shows that TSU is on an upward trajectory when it comes to job placement for new graduates.

Within three months of receiving their degrees, nearly 52 percent of students who graduated in December had received “some form of employment opportunities,” according to the Career Development Center. That’s just 6 percent shy of the national average of graduates who had jobs within six months of graduation, according to College Track, an online database that guides parents and students in college selection.

Last year, TSU received a $2 million career development grant from the United Negro College Fund. The money gave the Career Development Center staff the tools to prepare and ultimately help TSU students secure employment immediately upon graduation.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Grandmother, Granddaughter graduate from Tennessee State University

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Although born more than 40 years apart, Theresa Lyles and her granddaughter Zuri Lyles were part of the same graduating class at Tennessee State University.

Theresa, 68, and Zuri, 22, walked across the stage to accept their degrees, when TSU held its spring undergraduate commencement in the Howard C. Gentry Complex on May 5. Theresa’s degree is in sociology, while Zuri received a bachelor’s degree in health information management and a minor in business.

Theresa Lyles, left, and Zuri Lyles may be the first grandmother/granddaughter graduating pair in TSU’s more than 100-year history. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“I never contemplated this,” Theresa said when asked about she and her granddaughter graduating at the same time. “Who new that when I started back then that I would be graduating at the same time as she did. Nobody but God.”

Theresa, a grandmother of 15, started at TSU in 1967, but dropped out in 1970 to raise her family. A little over a year ago, she came back to school without knowing she earned enough credits back then to put her close to graduating, until her academic advisers told her. But a few months into her schooling, alongside Zuri, tragedy hit the family. Theresa lost her middle daughter, Zuri’s mother, on January 6.

“That hit us so hard that I almost dropped out because I was struggling and my grandmother went through a depression,” said Zuri. “But we kept encouraging each other. Through it all, we started working harder and did everything we needed to get the job done.”

Zuri, who has a job offer with St. Thomas General as an information systems analyst, said she plans to attend graduate school and get a degree in physical therapy. For now, Theresa will continue to help with raising her grandchildren, but she is glad to finally get her degree.

“I always wanted to come back, but just never had the chance to do it,” she said. “I am glad I did, and it’s even better that I am doing it with my granddaughter. We encouraged each other. It was tough, but we had to tunnel through.”

Said Zuri: “It feels amazing and life-changing for both of us” to be graduating at the same time. 

This may just be the first time in TSU’s more than 100-year history that a grandmother and a granddaughter will be graduating at the same time.

Zuri is graduating with honors. Her ultimate goal is to start her own business.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.


First-generation College Student Fulfills Parents’ Dream, Says Coming to TSU Was Best Choice

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Ever since Amber Hawkins started going to school, her parents have encouraged her to fulfill a dream they weren’t able to achieve: to graduate from college.

On May 5, Hawkins fulfilled her parents’ dream. She was among nearly 1,000 students who received degrees when TSU held its spring commencement at the Howard C. Gentry Complex. Hawkins graduated with a bachelor’s degree in political science and a minor in English.

Amber Hawkins

The oldest of three, Hawkins is the first in her family to earn a college degree, and credits her parents and maternal grandmother, a schoolteacher for more than 35 years, for the motivation to succeed.

“My grandmother definitely inspired and motivated me about my education,” says Hawkins, a native of Memphis, Tennessee, who is graduating with honors. “Along with my parents, she constantly reminded me that school always comes first. And if anything comes before school, then it shouldn’t be in my life.”

For Hawkins, the journey has been more than about graduating from college. It’s been about pursuing excellence. And she says TSU has provided the environment to make her dream possible.

“Tennessee State University has been a phenomenal experience that allowed me to be the best I can be,” says Hawkins, an academic standout at Memphis’ White Station High School, who promised earlier in her academic career “never to settle for low grades” and to work hard to be the best at whatever she pursues.

At TSU, Hawkins graduated with a 4.0 grade point average, something she has maintained throughout her matriculation. She has received a full graduate assistantship to purse a master’s degree in higher education administration at William Patterson University.

“TSU has been a perfect fit for me since I first came on campus on a college tour. I felt welcomed, and that coming here I would be part of a family as opposed to being a number, and I have not been disappointed,” says Hawkins. “The HBCU experience has been very rewarding. I came here not know knowing what career path to follow, but with the care I received and participating in activities that enhance others’ life, I have definitely found an interest in working with students.”

Hawkins engaged in many campus activities, including a travel-abroad opportunity. She is a member of the Honors College, served on the disciplinary committee in the office of student conduct, worked in the Tiger Tutoring lab to help with student placement for faculty-peer tutoring, as well as worked with the university marching band as a support staff.

In her junior year, Hawkins won an opportunity to work with the United College Fund Career Path Initiative. In the same year, she traveled to Paris to study the works of renowned writers like James Baldwin and Richard Wright as part of her academic work.

Hawkins, whose ultimate goal is to become a college president, especially at an HBCU, said these activities, including working in the office of the vice president of student affairs as the chief student judicial officer for about three years, has spawned an interest to serve students.

“This career path makes me feel I am making a positive difference in someone’s life in inspiring other students and working with administrators in creating a conducive environment, so that students can thrive,” says Hawkins. “In doing that, I have come to the conclusion that being the VP for student affairs, preferably at an HBCU, would be the best means to achieve something I am very passionate about.”

As she leaves TSU, Hawkins is thankful to many she says made her journey possible through personal care, advising, mentoring and who “went the extra mile to make sure I was using my time wisely.”

“Professor (Kyle) Murray I will always remember,” says Hawkins. “He has been one of the most supportive faculty members that I have ever had the pleasure of meeting here at TSU. I can say that I would not have the drive, the dedication, and the confidence … as a student and be prepared to go out into the professional world without his support, advice, criticizing me, even when it hurts at times.”

Dr. Murray, academic advisor and instructor in the Department of Political Science, describes Hawkins as “ undoubtedly the best university student” he has ever worked with.

“From the day Amber arrived to our degree program, she has been driven and ambitious, but never in an egotistical way,” says Murray. “In sports, coaches often refer to apt players as very ‘coachable.’ I can easily say the same thing about Amber. Amber’s ambition was never to try and fit in to extracurricular organizations, but her sole focus, rather, was on developing her academic qualities in addition to contributing to this institution as a whole through direct service.”

For Hawkins, her goal is to develop a graduate research project around “HBCUs and What They Mean in the 21st Century.”

“Since I want to work at an HBCU, I felt like William Patterson has the appropriate spot for me to do that,” says Hawkins.

It’s students like Amber, and the class of 2018, that keep the legacy – think, work, serve – alive and thriving for TSU.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Job Outlook Shows Great Promise for Tennessee State University Graduates

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – College graduates will soon hit the market with big dreams and high expectations, and Tennessee State University is helping to make them a reality.

Focused academic preparation, combined with job readiness training and career coaching are paying huge dividends for upcoming TSU graduates.

On May 4 and 5, the university will graduate more than 1,000 students at its dual spring commencements. Officials say a “substantial number” have already received job or internship offers.

Representatives from Kroger Regional Office talk to a TSU student, right, during a recent career fair on the TSU main campus. (Phto by TSU Career Development Center)

Among them is Emmanuel Gyang of Nashville. Upon his graduation on May 5, he will be heading to Bank of America in Dallas as a systems engineer in the company’s data center.

So will Justus Watson, who graduates with a bachelor’s degree in agricultural sciences with a biotechnology concentration. The Atlanta native will join Union Pacific in the marketing and sales department in Omaha, Nebraska.

And Kevin Scott, also of Nashville, who will receive a degree in electrical engineering. Scott has potential job offers waiting for him with Lockheed Martin and AMRDEC, or the Army Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center.

Recent data comparison shows that TSU is on an upward trajectory when it comes to job placement for new graduates.

Within three months of receiving their degrees, nearly 52 percent of students who graduated in December had received “some form of employment opportunities,” according to the TSU Career Development Center. That’s just 6 percent shy of the national average of graduates who had jobs within six months of graduation, according to College Track, an online database that guides parents and students in college selection.

What is driving these high numbers for TSU?

“It starts with leadership,” says Dr. Tracey Ford, TSU’s vice-president for Student Affairs. “Our president, Dr. Glenda Glover, has elevated the expectation of job placement for our graduates and has charged Student Affairs to be aggressive and innovative in our approach to recruiting employers and securing internships and permanent placement for our talented students.”

More than 130 vendors, including major employers and graduate school representatives, attended the Fall Career and Job Fair on campus last October. (Photo by TSU Career Development Center)

Ford also attributes TSU’s success to the “outstanding job performance” of former students who are employed with companies around the nation and the world.

“Our students who have become great employees at these world-renowned companies are making such an impact that it causes the employers to want to continue to recruit at Tennessee State University,” says Ford.

Last year, TSU received a $2 million career development grant from the United Negro College Fund. The money gave Career Development Center staff the tools to prepare and ultimately help TSU students secure employment immediately upon graduation.

Bethany Beaty, talent acquisition specialist at Enterprise Holdings, Inc., who has hired several TSU graduates over the years, says, “TSU students are very realistic and very ambitious.”

“They always have a drive, and always willing to start at the bottom and work their way up,” says Beaty.

Collectively, the success of Gyang, Watson and Scott and the many other upcoming graduates is a clear reflection of TSU’s “aggressive and innovative” approach to job skills readiness and placement, says Charles Jennings, director of the Career Development Center.

According to Jennings, relationships with employers have been a major factor for TSU’s success. For instance, a career fair in October – one of the largest in recent years – brought more than 130 companies on campus, “all looking to hire our students.” Among major companies at the fair were Apple, Microsoft, Ford Motor Company and Health Career Connections.

“I will have to say we are doing some outstanding work here at TSU in terms of our outreach with employers, not only within the Nashville area, but nationwide,” says Jennings.

Gyang, who interned with Bank of America last year, says he’s “anxiously” waiting for his July start date with the corporate giant.

“I feel blessed to be graduating with a job with a company like Bank of America,” he says. “I owe it to TSU for the preparation I received in the classroom and from the Career Development Center. They definitely honed me to be the person I am today. They taught me how to carry myself in a more professional manner.”

Watson and Scott share Gyang’s sentiments.

“I am pretty excited about this opportunity,” says Watson, the outgoing vice-president of the Student Government Association, who said an interaction at an Agriculture Future of America leadership conference helped him to land the job with Union Pacific.

“A lot of how TSU prepared me made that moment possible. Motivations from my advisors in the College of Agriculture, along with outstanding mentors, and participating in different organizations on campus were helpful. Without TSU, I know for sure I would not have been ready for this opportunity.”

For more information on the TSU Career Development Center, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/careers/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Student Finds His Way “To The Top” As Author of Children’s Books

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – One brief conversation with Tennessee State University senior Deontae Henderson, and it becomes clear that he is an undeniable force of inspiration and positivity.

Each morning, the 21-year-old Minneapolis, Minnesota native begins his podcast, Just Deontae, by proclaiming to the world, “I can’t stop until I make it to the top.” For Henderson, making it “to the top” is not just a catch phrase; it’s a way of life, as well as the title of his first children’s book.

To The Top tells the story of a turtle named Koa who overcomes numerous obstacles during his quest to make it to the top of a mountain. On his journey, Koa encounters various animals that discourage him from reaching his destination. However, Koa exercises persistence and determination until he reaches his goal.

Like Koa, Henderson’s story is one of overcoming obstacles. In fact, his mother, Evette Henderson, said his writing started as a result of her finding constructive ways to discipline her son when he was in grade school.

“When Deontae was young, he had to do a lot of time-outs because he wouldn’t listen. In his time-outs, he would have to read or write. He did a lot of writing,” she said. “When he would get in trouble at school, I would also have him come home and write out his five-year plan, and I still have some of the papers he would write for me.”

Henderson’s book, which can be purchased through Barnes and Noble, Amazon, Kindle, Nook, iBook, Xulon Press, and Mall of America, became the number one selling book by a local author at a Minneapolis Barnes and Noble, surpassing the sales of My Country, ‘Tis of Thee: My Faith, My Family, Our Future, a book written by Keith Ellison, the first Muslim elected to Congress and the first nonwhite that Minnesota has ever elected to Congress.

The founder and CEO of an inspirational brand called S.M.O.O.V.E., which stands for Steady Moving On Our Visions Everyday, Henderson uses his company to create bracelets, apparel, and books to encourage and motivate others to pursue the best version of themselves.

“What I’m starting to realize is that those people we look up to, Steve Jobs, Stan Lee, Jim Henson who made the muppets, Jay-Z, P Diddy, and Ryan Cooglar who just made The Black Panther, all these people are just being big kids. And when you watch the interviews they say, ‘I’m just doing what I wanted to do as a kid,’” he said. “They are having fun doing what they are doing and they don’t see it as a job.”

A consummate optimist, Henderson said a great deal of his success can be credited to the training he received from his mother.

“She really taught us to believe in ourselves,” he said. “She gave us so much confidence that whenever we went to do anything, we thought, ‘Yeah we can accomplish it. This is easy for us.’ And she still does that. No matter what, she always has my back.”

After a disappointing introduction to college life, Henderson set his sites on attending TSU and becoming a walk-on member of the TSU Flying Tigers Track Team. In order to make the team, he had to impress Olympic Gold Medalist and TSU Track Coach Chandra Cheeseborough.

“He found Coach Cheese, and he e-mailed her. At first she denied him, but he just kept contacting her, and she finally told him he could come and do a walk on,” Henderson’s mother said. “I just packed all our stuff, and we basically went on faith. We just threw all his stuff in my truck and I drove him to TSU, and that’s how he got there. He’s been there ever since.”

Cheeseborough said Henderson, who graduates Cum Laude next weekend from TSU with a bachelor of science in mass communications, has what it takes to be successful.

“I am proud of Deontae, and what he has accomplished as an author,” she said. “He has a spirit of determination, and that will take him a long way.”

Henderson, who recently released his second children’s book, Momma Bear, which is available on Amazon, said being an author brings him great joy.

“When I am able to write a story, put it out there, and receive a profit from my own ideas and what I love to do, that’s actually the best feeling ever,” he said.

To listen to Henderson’s daily inspirational podcast, visit https://apple.co/2r1ypTw or https://spoti.fi/2qZG4Bw .

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU honors student-athletes and coaches at 2018 Athletics Banquet

Courtesy: TSU Athletics

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s Athletic Department honored its student-athletes and coaches at the annual awards banquet Tuesday night.

Former TSU men’s basketball player and Mr. TSU Jordan Gaither served as the master of ceremonies for the event in Kean Hall, with Director of Athletics Teresa Phillips and TSU President Glenda Glover delivering opening remarks.

The head coach from each program spoke about their team and presented their award winners.

Among the major award winners were track and field senior James Faison, as the Male Athlete of the Year, and women’s basketball junior Tia Wooten, as the Female Athlete of the Year. They were voted on by TSU’s athletic administrators and head coaches.

Men’s tennis senior Shashank Nautiyal earned the Top Male Academic Excellence Award for the highest GPA among male student-athletes. On the women’s side, the Top Female Academic Excellence Award was shared by Pragati Natraj (tennis) and Abhilasha Vishwanath (tennis).

AWARD WINNERS

  • MALE ATHLETE OF THE YEAR
    • James Faison – Men’s Track and Field
  • FEMALE ATHLETE OF THE YEAR
    • Tia Wooten – Women’s Basketball
  • FOOTBALL
    • Joe W. Gilliam Defensive Player of the Year – Chris Collins
    • Eldridge Dickey Offensive Player of the Year – Patrick Smith
    • Sidney Crutchfield Special Teams Player of the Year – Lane Clark
    • Richard Dent-Defensive Lineman – Jason Morrow
    • Vernon Holland Offensive Lineman of the Year – Ty Allen
    • Alvin “CAT” Coleman Co-Offensive Back of the Year – Sabree Curtis/Seth Rowland
    • Ed “Too Tall” Jones Most improved Player – Terrence Summers
    • Fred Lee Spirit Award – Terence Harris
    • Dominique Rodgers Cromartie (DRC) Defensive Back of the Year – LaQuarius Cook
    • Heart of a Tiger Courage Award – Arkeem Granger
  • WOMEN’S BASKETBALL
    • MVP – Tia Wooten
    • Defensive Player of the Year – Asia Sims
    • Tiger Leadership Award – Maxine Beard
    • Most Improved Player – Kaliya Griffin
    • Rookie of the Year – Taylor Roberts
  • MEN’S BASKETBALL
    • Anthony Mason Defensive Player of the Year- Christian Mekowulu
    • Carlos Rogers Most Improved Player- Delano Spencer
    • Robert Covington Character Award – Tripp Davis
  • VOLLEYBALL
    • MVP – Cherlie Adorno-DeJesus
    • Newcomer of the Year – Rachel Henderson
    • Setter of the Year – Samantha Beltran
  • MEN’S TENNIS
    • MVP – Shashank Nautiyal
  • WOMEN’S TENNIS
    • MVP – Pragati Natraj
  • MEN’S CROSS COUNTRY
    • MVP – Larry McNary
  • WOMEN’S CROSS COUNTRY
    • MVP – Rebekah Wynn
  • WOMEN’S INDOOR TRACK AND FIELD
    • MVP – Angel Horton
  • MEN’S INDOOR TRACK AND FIELD
    • Co-MVP – James Faison
    • Co-MVP –R’Lazon Brumfield
  • SOFTBALL
    • MVP – Megan Huppee
  • SPIRIT TEAM
    • MVP – Rickia Langston
  • MEN’S GOLF
    • MVP – TBA
  • WOMEN’S GOLF
    • MVP – TBA
  • MEN’S OUTDOOR TRACK AND FIELD
    • MVP – TBA
  • WOMEN’S OUTDOOR TRACK AND FIELD
    • MVP – TBA
  • TOP MALE ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE AWARD
    • Shashank Nautiyal – Men’s Tennis
  • TOP FEMALE ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE AWARD
    • Pragati Natraj – Women’s Tennis
    • Abhilasha Vishwanath – Women’s Tennis
  • ACADEMIC AWARDS
    • Samson Oyediran – Men’s Basketball
    • Maxine Beard – Women’s Basketball
    • Jemarruse Amos – Men’s Track and Field
    • Amani Taylor – Women’s Track and Field
    • Lane Clark – Football
    • Kody Rendleman – Men’s Golf
    • Morgan Rood – Women’s Golf
    • Megan Huppee – Softball
    • Shashank Nautiyal – Men’s Tennis
    • Pragati Natraj – Women’s Tennis
    • Abhilasha Vishwanath – Women’s Tennis
    • Ani Popiashvili – Women’s Tennis
    • Cherlie Adorno – DeJesus Volleyball
    • Asyen Taylor – Spirit Team
  • FEMALE LIFTER OF THE YEAR
    • Nicquayleeonntea Moore – Women’s Track and Field
  • MALE LIFTER OF THE YEAR
    • Chris Rowland – Football

To see photo gallery and video from the banquet, visit http://www.tsutigers.com/news/articles/2017-18/8595/tsu-celebrates-2018-athletics-banquet/

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Members of Hamilton High School state championship basketball team visit TSU

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Members of the State Champion Hamilton High School boys basketball team visited Tennessee State University on Thursday and got a chance to talk with the university’s new basketball coach, and other faculty.

TSU men’s basketball coach Brian “Penny” Collins with members of some of the Hamilton High School state champion boys basketball team. (photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

The Memphis, Tennessee, team, which recently won the TSSAA Class AA title, was honored at the state Legislature before coming to TSU, where they were treated to lunch with administrators and other faculty, including new TSU men’s basketball coach Brian “Penny” Collins, who is also from Memphis. The young men also met TSU’s mascot.

During his talk with the players, Collins said basketball is a great skill to have, but they should also get a great education.

“That ball will stop bouncing one day,” said Collins. “You have to get your education, get your degree. And then along the road, it will provide you with opportunities to make your dreams come true.”

At least two of the high school players say they plan to attend TSU after graduating in May.

“I heard it’s a great school,” said Martarius Tate, who plans to major in business. “I want to have my own company.”

Markwon Kirkland said he’s also heard TSU is the place to be.

“I just feel like it will give me a good experience,” he said.

Hamilton High basketball coach Will Smith said he’s glad some of his players want to attend TSU. He said he and his wife helped put a former high school player through TSU about five years ago. He said that student has since graduated, and is successful.

“It’s a great campus,” said Smith, who, along with some of his coaching staff, really appreciated TSU’s hospitality.

“The support and how do things around here is just first class,” said Smith.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Internationally Known Vegan Trainer Tay Sweat Among Experts To Greet Public At Health And Wellness Fair at TSU

NASHVILLE, Tenn(TSU News Service) – Certified personal trainer and nutrition coach Tay Sweat knows what it means to fight for his life. At age 15, he weighed 311 pounds and found himself in a constant battle with diabetes and high blood pressure. Afraid he would meet an early death, Sweat decided as a teenager to take control of his health.

“I got rid of my diabetes and my high blood pressure, and from there I started helping others do the same,” said Sweat, who is now an internationally recognized health guru with clients in Australia, Canada and Japan.

Certified personal trainer and nutrition coach Tay Sweat (submitted photo)

Sweat is one of many health, nutrition and fitness experts who will take part in a unique community health and wellness fair this Friday at Tennessee State University from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Kean Hall.

The fair, which is a partnership between TSU, the DP Thomas Foundation for Obesity, Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s HIV Vaccine Program, and the Turnip Truck, will feature more than 40 vendors and give participants opportunities to receive massages, chiropractic care, dental screenings, HIV testing and more.

Sweat, who does 90 to 95 percent of his business online and the remaining with high profile clients like Tennessee Titans players and their wives, is excited about this opportunity to share what he has learned with the general public.

“I want people, when they see me, to see the difference eating a lot of plants can have. But not only that, I want to speak to the people and answer questions,” said Sweat, who lost more than 120 pounds before packing on an additional 25 pounds of muscle using a vegan diet.

Lalita Hodge, TSU coordinator of Public Relations and a member of the DP Thomas Board of Directors, said the purpose of the fair is to keep the community informed about the resources that are available to them.

“You will see some of your traditional vendors there like the YMCA, but you will also see nontraditional healing methods there like coffee enema, the Turnip Truck with their organic produce, and we have healthy lunches that will include organic free-range turkey,” she said.

Hodge said organizers are placing special emphasis on getting senior citizens and college students to participate.

Keith Richardson, community engagement coordinator for the Vanderbilt HIV Vaccine Program, stressed the important of students attending the health fair.

“Students are young and they need to know the importance of health and what it means to take care of themselves,” said Richardson, a 2008 alumnus of TSU. “Maybe they can catch health issues early before things get out of hand as they become adults and just have a good mindset about eating and exercising right, and just taking care of their bodies.”

Dolly Patton-Thomas, executive director of the DP Thomas Foundation for Obesity, said she hopes the event will motivate people to live healthier lives. She said Sweat and Certified Holistic Wellness Coach Karina Hammer are just two of the many vendors she is elated to see continue their participation in the fair, which is in its third year.

“I’m just excited about the health fair, and I hope that all will come out and that we will have people just to gain knowledge about what we have to offer and what is out there for them,” Patton-Thomas said. “When you are given the knowledge, you won’t be blindsided. You can run with it and you can choose what to do.”

For more information about the Community Health and Wellness Fair, call 615-474-1286, or email: dpthomasfoundation@gmail.com.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.