Category Archives: Athletics

National Medical Association President, Dr. Edith P. Mitchell, Former U.S. Congressman Harold Ford, Jr., to give spring commencement addresses at TSU

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The President of the National Medical Association, Dr. Edith P. Mitchell, and Former U.S. Congressman Harold Ford, Jr., will be the keynote speakers at Tennessee State University’s spring commencement ceremonies.

Mitchell, a retired Air Force brigadier general, will speak at 5 p.m. on Friday, May 6, at the graduate commencement in the Gentry Complex. Ford will address the undergraduate class at 9 a.m. on Saturday, May 7, in Hale Stadium.

More than 1,300 undergraduate and graduate students will receive degrees in various disciplines.

“I congratulate all of our graduates and wish them the very best as they enter a new and exciting chapter of their lives,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. “Commencement is an exciting time for the university because it highlights the academic achievement of our students and the commitment of faculty and staff in their educational and social development. TSU students are prepared to work and serve in the global marketplace.”

Mitchell, a 1969 TSU graduate with a B.S. degree in Biochemistry, is Clinical Professor of Medicine and Medical Oncology, and Program Leader in Gastrointestinal Oncology at Thomas Jefferson University. She is a fellow of the American College of Physicians and a member of the American Medical Association, the National Medical Association, Aerospace Medical Association, Association of Military Surgeons, and the Medical Society of Eastern Pennsylvania.

Last year, she was elected president of the NMA, the nation’s oldest professional society for African-American physicians.

In addition to her medical achievements, the retired brigadier general served as the Air National Guard Assistant to the Command Surgeon for U.S. Transportation Command and Headquarters Air Mobility Command at the Scott Air Force Base in Illinois. In this capacity, she served as the senior medical Air National Guard advisor to the command surgeon and was the medical liaison between the active Air Force and the Air National Guard.

Ford, a five-term former member of Congress from Tennessee, was chair of the Democratic Leadership Council. He served on the Financial Services and Budget Committees and worked to balance the budget and promote free enterprise for the House Blue Dog coalition, the organization that gave then Governor Bill Clinton his start in national politics.

As president, Clinton once referred to Ford as “the walking, living embodiment of where America ought to go in the 21st century.” Ford is a longtime supporter of small and mid-size businesses, as well as a staunch advocate for fiscal and economic reform. Since leaving office in 2007, he continues to work diligently to promote healthy non-partisan debate on today’s most pressing issues.

Currently, Ford serves as a political analyst and contributor for CNBC and MSNBC, and a professor of public policy at the New York University Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service.

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Matthew Edwards is graduating from TSU with a degree in Agriculture. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Matthew Edwards is among the undergraduates who will receive their degrees on May 7. He said he’s glad TSU invited Mitchell and Ford to speak, and he believes they will inspire students to continue to strive for success beyond college.

As for his experience at TSU, Edwards said the university has faculty and administrators who really care about students’ success. He said TSU officials provided him with resources to overcome some hardships when he transferred from another university, and he encourages high school graduates to consider TSU as an option for getting a higher education.

“They transferred all the credits, made sure everything was set, and provided me with a work-study scholarship,” said Edwards, who is getting a degree in Agriculture. “I went from not having a place to go, to having a place to call home and a nice steady job in an area that I liked.“

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

New TSU Top Cop Greg Robinson Emphasizes Good Relationship Between Students, Police

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s new top cop says a good relationship between students and police will benefit campus security.

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Police Chief Greg Robinson

Police Chief Greg Robinson had a “meet-and-greet” at two TSU residence halls on April 20, about a month after taking the job. Deputy Police Chief Anthony Carter and several other members of the TSUPD accompanied the alumnus during his visit to Boyd Hall, where Robinson lived as a TSU student, and Wilson Hall.

In his closed meetings with residents, Robinson emphasized personal relationships between students and campus security, increased visibility, and for students to know that “we are here for you.”

“We want to break down all barriers and build relationships where you are comfortable to interact with us and know that your safety is our biggest concern,” said Robinson, who has over 30 years of experience in law enforcement. “You see things that we don’t see. We want to hear from you.”

He said he wanted to speak directly to the residents to let them know his vision for the university, faculty, staff, and “most importantly the students.”

“I attended this institution; I lived in Boyd Hall,” said Robinson.  “I want to let them (students) understand that all we are concerned about is serving this institution and to make it the safest environment.”

Carlos Marvins, a graduating senior in Mass Communications, lives in Boyd Hall and attended the meeting. He said he was impressed with Robinson and believes the university is in the “right direction about security.”

“He seems like … he really cares about the students,” Marvins said. “He has a lot of ideas; he’s young, he’s energized and has a lot of experience. And the fact that he’s a former student makes it even better.”

Robinson plans to visit other residence halls on the campus.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Robinson plans to visit other residence halls on the campus.

Single Gift of $26,000 Highlights Weekend of TSU Alumni Activities

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A single gift of nearly $26,000 capped a weekend of activities by Tennessee State University alumni to raise funds for scholarship to support students at their alma mater.

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TSU President Glenda Glover, along with Associate Vice President for Institutional Advancement Eloise Abernathy Alexis, and TSU National Alumni Association President Tony Wells, receives a check for $25,735 from member of Beta Omicron Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The Beta Omicron Chapter of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity presented the check Saturday to TSU President Glenda Glover during the halftime show of the TSU Tigers Football Team Blue and White scrimmage at Hale Stadium.

“This is amazing,” Glover said, referring to the presentation and the level of excitement in the stadium. “To see all of our alums come back for our Blue and White game and then present us a check just shows what TSU alums can do when they put their minds together and dedicate themselves to helping their university. I am just pleased to see this number of people including old friends and schoolmates just having a good time.”

Thousands, including former and current students, friends and supporters, gathered at the stadium called “The Hole” for the scrimmage, as part of the weekend of activities. The TSU nationally recognize marching band, the Aristocrat of Bands, was on hand to lead the jubilation.

This was the third year of the event called Legends Coming Home Weekend.

Tony Wells, president of the TSU National Alumni Association, said the weekend is time for alumni to come back and engage with students.

“Homecoming is when alumni come back and interact with each other,” Wells said. “But this is an effort to come back in the spring and make sure we are engaging with our students and help them with their networking. We don’t want to wait until they are ready to graduate. We want to be there to help them understand the process before they leave.”

Earlier, more than 300 participated in the Big Blue Tiger 5K Run/Walk to kick off the day on the main campus. Organizers say nearly 700 paid to register for the race although many did not plan to run.

At Hale Stadium, Crowd favorite, 101-year-old Burnece Walker Brunson, a member of the Alumni Cheerleader Association, did not disappoint. The centenarian, a member of the 1934-1935 cheering squad, showed up with her pom pom.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Football Players Teach Youngsters Importance of Physical Fitness

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The TSU Tigers’ football team recently took time to help some tiger cubs understand the importance of staying fit.

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TSU Tigers Middle Linebacker Chris Collins runs 2-5-year-olds through a drill in the Indoor Practice Field to show the young tigers the importance of physical fitness. The children are from the TSU Early Learning Center. (Photo by TSU Sports Information)

The program on April 1 was part of activities planned by the university’s Early Learning Center to engage its 2 to 5-year-olds in fun activities with the football players, while giving them an early start in physical fitness.

“It was all fun and an effort to get these young kids an early start in physical activities,” said Coach Rod Reed.

Dr. Beatrice Harris, the center’s director, said she enjoyed watching the football players interact with the youngsters.

“We really just wanted the football team to show the Little Tigers of the Early Learning Center how to catch and throw a football, “ she said.

Chris Collins, a middle linebacker with the Tigers and a sophomore mass communications major, said the experience with the children brought back old memories.

“I remember when I was a little kid, older kids would come and play with us and actually take us through football drills at summer camp,” Collins said. “It was just a lot of fun, and something these kids will remember for a long time.”

Collins, who led the drills in the Indoor Practice Field, said the children did stretches, ran up and down the practice field, and jumped over dummies, “like we do in real practice.”

“This teaches the kids a little discipline like we do as athletes to get ready and get warmed up for the season,” Reed said. “Hopefully this will teach them the importance of staying fit.”

The Department of Family and Consumer Sciences in the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences runs the Early Learning Center, which conducts research in all phases of early education and child development.

Seventeen children are enrolled at the center, which runs from 7:45 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Honors Day Convocation Recognizes TSU’s Best and Brightest Students

HonorsNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Room) – Tennessee State University recognized its best and brightest students when the university held its annual Honors Day Convocation on March 22.

The convocation in Kean Hall  recognized distinguished undergraduates from all disciplines, top graduating seniors, Honors College participants, outstanding members of the various honor societies, and students on the President’s and Dean’s Lists.

More than 2,350 students with grade point averages of 3.0 or higher were honored.

Up to 120 students on the President’s List received special recognition. These students have maintained 4.0 GPAs throughout their matriculation. They include four seniors, two juniors, 16 sophomores, and 98 freshmen.

This year marks the inaugural convocation of the TSU Honors College, previously called the Honors Program. The 51-year-old program was elevated to a college in 2015 on the recommendation of TSU and the approval of the Tennessee Board of Regents, and the Tennessee Higher Education Commission.

Dr. Coreen Jackson, director of the Honors College, said “the elevation raised the bar” for academic excellence, mentorship, and professional development of exceptional students.

“When a university elevates its honors program to a college, it positions itself to attract, recruit and retain academically brilliant students,” Jackson said. “The elevation offers greater visibility to the university, creates a high level interdisciplinary curriculum that prepares the next generation of leaders for academic and vocational success, scholarship, achievement and service.”

Ashley Parmer, a senior communications major, and Jaquantey Bowens, a sophomore biology major, were among the student honorees with 4.0 GPAs. They said their academic success is due largely to the support and nurturing they receive as members of the Honors College.

“The Honors Program has been a great tool and added bonus of my college matriculation,” said Parmer, editor of The Meter, the student newspaper. She has been with the program since her freshman year.

“Everyone in the college wants you to excel,” Parmer said. “If you are lost, they will help you find your way. If you need advice, they will be there to give it to you.”

Added Bowens: “Not only has the Honors Program made me a better student, but it has also brought forth lifelong friendships. The atmosphere of the program is like a second home – it is always there to support you.”

Jackson thanked TSU President Glenda Glover for her support, which she said made the Honors College possible. A TSU graduate, Glover was a member of the Honors Program while a student at TSU.

“This high honor could not have happened without the full support of President Glover,” Jackson said. “She has made the Honors College a top priority in her presidency. Her commitment has been unwavering and resolute.”

Beverly Bond, an actress and president and CEO of Black Girls Rock!, was the special guest lecturer at the convocation.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Former TSU Lineman Wins Super Bowl with Broncos

Courtesy: TitansOnline.com 

SANTA CLARA – This time last season, Robert “Snacks” Myers was preparing for the NFL Combine after wrapping up his playing days at Tennessee State University.

By the night of Feb. 7, Myers was clutching the Vince Lombardi Trophy as a member of the Denver Broncos, who had beaten the Carolina Panthers 24-10 in Super Bowl 50.

“The way this team prepared, and the way this team has handled its business, I imagined myself hoisting this at the end of the night,’’ Myers said in Denver’s locker room after the game. “But actually doing it, I don’t know how to put it in words.

“It has been crazy, but everything happens for a reason. I feel like it was predestined for me to be on this team as a Super Bowl champion.”

Myers, who played at TSU from 2010-2014, was signed by Denver off of Baltimore’s practice squad at the end of December, just in time for the team’s Super Bowl run.

Myers started all 12 games for TSU in 2014, and made the All-OVC Second Team in his junior and senior seasons. He was a fifth-round draft pick by the Baltimore Ravens in May, but was added to Denver’s roster for depth.

Myers was among the inactives for the Broncos on Sunday. He was on the sideline, but not in uniform.

He’ll get a Super Bowl ring, on top of the Super Bowl memorabilia he’d already received post-game. But the memories – and the experience – mean the most.

“This whole experience, it is so valuable,” Myers said. “I have seen what it takes and I have learned so much. It’s been great.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Receives Prestigious Award for number of players who have gone on to Super Bowls

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University received a prestigious award for the number of TSU football players who have gone on to play in Super Bowls.

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TSU President Glenda Glover attends 7th Annual John Wooten Leadership Awards ceremony in San Francisco on Feb. 4 to accept award for number of TSU football players who have gone to Super Bowls. Glover was presented the award by former TSU player and Pro Football Hall of Famer Richard Dent, MVP of Super Bowl XX with the Chicago Bears. (Submitted photo).

TSU President Glenda Glover accepted the award on Feb. 4 at the 7th Annual John Wooten Leadership Awards in San Francisco.

TSU’s football legacy dates back to the first Super Bowl and continued on Feb. 7 when the Denver Broncos beat the Carolina Panthers 24-10 in Super Bowl 50 in Santa Clara, California.

Former TSU offensive guard Robert Myers was on the Denver squad. The 6-foot-5, 326-pound rookie joined the Broncos’ active roster Dec. 30 and played in the AFC champions’ final regular-season game and each of their playoff wins.

“Tennessee State University has had a number of former players who have been in past Super Bowls dating back to the first one, and Myers’ continues this rich tradition,” Glover said. “Considering this is the 50th anniversary of the Super Bowl, it’s an extreme honor to have a former TSU athlete participating. It also speaks to our proud tradition as a University and as an HBCU.”

TSU players who have gone on to play in Super Bowls over the years include Pro Football Hall of Famer Richard Dent, MVP of Super Bowl XX with the Chicago Bears; and Ed “Too Tall” Jones, who appeared in three Super Bowls as a member of the Dallas Cowboys.

“This is the 50th anniversary of the Super Bowl, the golden anniversary,” said Everett Glenn, organizer of the Wooten Awards and a sport attorney who once represented Dent. “And on the golden anniversary, we thought it would make sense to recognize guys from black colleges who have contributed to Super Bowl history.”

In 1967, former TSU Tigers Willie Mitchell and Fletcher Smith appeared as teammates in Super Bowl I for the Kansas City Chiefs. More than 20 others have followed them over the years, including Claude Humphrey, a 2014 Hall of Fame inductee who played in Super Bowl XV with the Philadelphia Eagles. More recent Super Bowl participants are Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie (2014); Anthony Levine (2011); and Lamar Divens (2010).

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Former TSU offensive guard Robert Myers (70) will be playing with the Denver Broncos when they face the Carolina Panthers in Super Bowl 50 on Feb. 7 in Santa Clara, California. (Photo by TSU Sports Information).

Myers’ name was  added to the list.

“Playing in the Super Bowl is one of the highest achievements an NFL player can reach,” said TSU Athletics Director Teresa Phillips. “So to have so many former TSU Tigers that have been able to participate in this great game is a phenomenal accomplishment. Tennessee State has the most Super Bowl appearances among HBCUs. That says a lot about our program through the years and the type of players that we produce.”

TSU head football coach Roderick Reed said the school is fortunate to have such a rich tradition of football.

“It’s something that has been happening for a while, and we’re really excited to have TSU’s name associated with the Super Bowl,” he said.

Myers, who started in 35 games at TSU from 2010-2014, was selected in the fifth round of the 2015 draft by the Ravens. After suffering a concussion in preseason camp, he was cut. The Colts added Myers to their 53-man roster in September and then waived him a few days later. He returned to Baltimore’s practice squad, where he remained until the Broncos signed him.

“Once I got out to Denver and walked into the building and saw how they (the Broncos) worked and the mentality, I realized this was a team that could make it to the Super Bowl,” Myers told The Tennessean.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Director of Track and Field Chandra Cheeseborough-Guice receives lifetime achievement award

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University Director of Track and Field Chandra Cheeseborough-Guice is the recipient of the Jimmy Carnes Lifetime Achievement Award.

She received the award from the Florida Track and Field Hall of Fame at a ceremony on Jan.  8 in Daytona Beach, Fla.

“Jimmy Carnes has done a lot for the sport of track and field, and I’m honored that my name is in a conversation with his name,” Cheeseborough-Guice said.

Carnes served as the head coach of the track and field team at the University of Florida before being named head coach of the United States Olympic Team.

Cheeseborough-Guice emerged on the scene in 1975 at age 16, where she won a gold medal in the 200-meter dash in the Pan American Games with a world junior record of 22.77 seconds. She also won the TAC 100-meter championship in a time of 11.13.

The Jacksonville, Fla. native went on to be named to three United States Olympic teams. She placed sixth as a 17-year old in the 100-meter dash in Montreal  in 1976. She qualified for the ill-fated 1980 Olympic team that did not compete because of a boycott. In 1984, at the Los Angeles games, she made Olympic history by running a leg on two gold-medal relay teams and was the silver medalist in the 400-meters.

As a coach, Cheeseborough-Guice has guided TSU to eight Ohio Valley Conference Championships and is an eight-time OVC Coach of the Year honoree.

In 2008, Cheeseborough-Guice was named the sprinter’s coach for the USA Team that competed in the Beijing, China Olympics. USA captured 23 medals that included 10 gold, eight silver and five bronze medals.

In 2009, she served as the women’s head coach for Team USA at the IAAF World Outdoor Championships in Berlin, Germany. Under Cheeseborough-Guice, the team collected 22 medals overall, winning more than any other country to dominate the placing table with 231 points. Team USA registered 10 gold, six silver and six bronze medals, along with several outstanding performances.

During the summer of 2015, the TSU graduate helped guide Team USA as an assistant coach at the Pan American Games in Toronto, Canada. Cheeseborough-Guice worked directly with the women’s sprinters and hurdlers, who took home 10 of the team’s 41 medals at the games.

 

Longtime AP Reporter Joins TSU as Director of Media Relations

Lucas Johnson-2_pp
Lucas Johnson

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Lucas Johnson, a longtime reporter with the Associated Press, has joined the communications team at Tennessee State University as director of Media Relations. He replaces Rick DelaHaya.

“I am very delighted to announce the addition of Lucas Johnson to our staff as the new director of Media Relations,” Kelli Sharpe, assistant vice president of University Public Relations and Communications, said. “For more than two decades as a reporter with the Associated Press Lucas has established himself as a capable and respected journalist. I am thrilled to have him join our media department.”

Prior to joining TSU, Johnson worked for 24 years with the AP covering local, state and national news. For the last 10 years he covered the Tennessee General Assembly as a beat reporter. A native of Memphis, Tennessee, Johnson holds a B.A. in journalism from Middle Tennessee State University.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Alum Robert Covington Excelling in Second Season with NBA’s Philadelphia 76ers

Courtesy: Tennessee State Sports Information

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Former Tennessee State men’s basketball star Robert Covington is excelling on basketball’s biggest stage as a starter for the NBA’s Philadelphia 76ers.

Robert Covington
Robert Covington was a decorated player for the Tigers during his four-year career at Tennessee State University. (Courtesy Photo)

After battling injury early in the season, the 6’9, 215-pound forward is averaging 14.1 points and 6.0 rebounds per game while leading the NBA with 3.2 steals per game. Now in his second season with the 76ers, Covington netted a career-high 28 points to go with a career-best eight steals on Nov. 28 versus the Houston Rockets.

In the 76ers final three games in November, Covington secured six-plus steals, making him the first NBA player to accomplish the feat in three-consecutive games since Alvin Robertson in 1986.

A 2013 graduate of Tennessee State University, Covington split time between the NBA’s Houston Rockets and the NBA D-League’s Rio Grande Valley Vipers in his first season as a professional in 2013-14. The Illinois native played his way to NBA D-League Rookie of the Year accolades, earning a spot on the 76ers roster the following season.

Covington was a decorated player for the Tigers during his four-year career, securing First Team All-Ohio Valley Conference accolades in 2012 and Second Team All-OVC honors in 2011 and 2013.

Current TSU Head Coach Dana Ford coached the now-NBA player during the 2009-10 and 2010-11 seasons, when Ford served as an assistant coach. Covington scored 1,749 career points for TSU, good for the eighth most in school history.

Covington and the 76ers were back in action Tuesday with a home game versus the Los Angeles Lakers.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.