Category Archives: Alumni

TSU Honors Top Researchers at 39th Annual University Wide Research Symposium

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University recognized its top student and faculty researchers during a ceremony in the Ferrell Westbrook Complex on the main campus on Friday.

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Awards Luncheon speaker Mark N. Russ engages students during his presentation at the Ferrell-Westbrook Complex. (Submitted Photo)

It was the Awards Luncheon culminating the weeklong 39th Annual University-Wide Research Symposium organized by the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

Awards were given for the top three winners in undergraduate and graduate oral and postal presentations.  Organizers received 155 student submissions in eight categories and 35 faculty submissions.

Mark N. Russ, executive assistant director of the National Security Directorate Naval Criminal Investigative Service, was the keynote speaker. He admonished the award winners to set high goals and stick with them if they want to be successful.

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Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, Dean of the College of Engineering, left, congratulates Kyra M. Bryant, a Ph.D. student in Computer Information Systems Engineering for winning first place award in Graduate Engineering II oral presentation. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

“By involving yourselves in award events like this you are stepping in the right direction, but it is not enough,” Russ said. “You have to continue to stick with it, continue to have your failures, successes and ultimately you will move in a direction where you are the only person with the background and experience to take it to the next level.”

Using Olympic champion Wilma Rudolph as an example of perseverance, Russ said no one thought she had a chance “because of things she had going against her.”

“She had medical issues and other health issues, but they did not stop her. She didn’t have to have someone tell her to keep working hard, she just didn’t quit and became one of the greatest athletes the world has ever seen,” Russ said.

Kyra M. Bryant, a Ph.D. student in Computer Information Systems Engineering, won first place in Graduate Engineering II oral presentation for her research on “Improved Bottom Friction, Surface Rachness, and Wind Stress in a Coupled Wave and Storm Surge Model.”

She said her study is aimed at developing a more accurate module for forecasting hurricanes.

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Dr. Margaret Mmbaga, took top award for faculty research. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

“Winning this award has been really very encouraging, pushing me to research even more on this topic,” Bryant said “We are trying to make the modeling more accurate and winning this award tells me that I am on the right path.”

In faculty research, Dr. Margaret Mmbaga won first place in the category of Faculty II for “Screening of Common Bean for Multiple Disease Resistance Under Natural Infection by Common Bacterial Blight and Charcoal Rot.”

Each year, an individual researcher is admitted into the “Million Dollar Club” during the awards ceremony. Individuals in this select group are recognized for receiving grant money of a million dollars or more in a single year.

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Dr. Marie Hammond, second from right, holds her award for becoming the newest Million Dollar Club member. She is congratulated by Phyllis Danner, Director of Research and Sponsored Programs, left, and research symposium co-chairs Dr. John Robinson, and Nannette Carter Martin. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

That recognition went to Dr. Marie Hammond, associate professor of psychology in the College of Education. In 2016, she received a $1.5 million National Science Foundation grant for basic research.

“I am honored, I am overwhelmed,” she said  “I am really grateful because I never would have gotten here without the support of people from across the university, who worked with me along the way.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Community Health and Wellness Fair at TSU promotes healthy lifestyle

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – More than 30 vendors from across the city participated in the Community Health and Wellness Fair at Tennessee State University on April 21.

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TSU President Glenda Glover (center) with health fair participants from Meharry Medical College and TSU’s Dental Hygiene Department. (photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

The event, which was free to the public, was a partnership between TSU, the DP Thomas Foundation for Obesity, Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s HIV Vaccine Program, and the Turnip Truck, a natural foods grocer in Nashville.

All the vendors set up in Kean Hall on the university’s main campus had some connection to health care and wellness.

“It’s important that vendors from around the area come here and show what it means to participate in healthy lifestyles,” TSU President Glenda Glover said. “We want to go over some of the preventive measures; precautionary actions. Prevention is the heart of public health.”

Among its offerings, the fair provided information on weight loss management and nutrition, as well as fitness demonstrations and health screenings, including hypertension, glucose and cholesterol. There was also an opportunity for attendees to sign up for insurance.

William Ligon and his niece, Jada Smith, drove from Gallatin, Tennessee to attend the health fair. Smith, who is currently attending a community college, plans to enroll in Tennessee State’s nursing program next year.

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William Ligon and his niece, Jada Smith (left), drove from Gallatin, Tennessee, to attend health fair. (photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

“I’ve always liked to be able to help out people in need,” Smith said. “I like to care for people.”

Both Ligon and Smith said they enjoyed the health fair.

“This is great,” Ligon said. “We need more of this.”

Along with the Nashville vendors, several Tennessee State programs and departments participated. They included the TSU Nursing School, the Agriculture Department, the TSU Center for Aging, the TSU Wellness Center, and TSU’s Dental Hygiene Department, which has a full service campus clinic that averages about 600 patients a year, many of whom are from the surrounding community.

Dr. Gary-Lee A. Lewis, head of TSU’s Dental Hygiene Department, said he hopes the fair will help increase that number “with the linkages that we make with the community.”

“It’s a mutually beneficial experience for both our students and value for the community,” Lewis said. “It showcases all aspects of health to the community.”

Vic Sorrell is the community engagement coordinator for the Vanderbilt HIV vaccine program, which provided HIV testing and HIV prevention education and information at the fair.

“This is an ideal way for our community to collaborate on reaching the goal of zero new HIV transmissions by the year 2020, according to the National HIV/AIDS Strategy,” Sorrell said.

Ivan Davis Sr., director of Student Health Services at TSU, said the university plans to host many more health fairs.

“We’re just trying to give people access,” Davis said. “Some people don’t know where to begin to get health access.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TSU Aristocrat of Bands to perform at 54th Annual State of Metro Address

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Nashville Mayor Megan Barry will include a lively performance by Tennessee State University’s Aristocrat of Bands when she delivers the “54th Annual State of Metro Address”  on April 26 at Bridgestone Arena in Nashville.

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The TSU Aristocrat of Bands was the first HBCU band to perform at a presidential inauguration. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Known for high quality musical performances, innovative arrangements and precision marching, the Aristocrat of Bands was the first historically black college or university band to appear on national television in 1955, the first HBCU band to perform at a presidential inauguration, and the first HBCU band named as an official band for an NFL team – the Tennessee Titans in 2002. In September 2016, the band was invited to Washington, D.C. to celebrate the opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture on the lawn of the White House.

“We are extremely honored for this invitation to perform at the Mayor’s State of Metro Address,” said Dr. Reginald McDonald, TSU’s director of Bands. “We see this as another opportunity to showcase the talents in the Aristocrat of Bands as well as let other people see what’s good and outstanding about Tennessee State University.”

The mayor’s State of Metro Address will include important details about the mayor’s budget proposal, which will be presented to the Metro Council following the event, according to the mayor’s office.

Members of the public are encouraged to attend the State of Metro Address, which begins at 10 a.m. For counting purposes only, attendees can RSVP at 54som.eventbrite.com. Seating will be on a first-come, first-serve basis. Anyone requesting accommodations due to disabilities should contact Jerry Hall, ADA Coordinator, at 615-862-8960 or Jerry.Hall@nashville.gov.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU students graduating with jobs say university has prepared them to succeed

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – When Maya Davis and Cametria Weatherspoon receive their degrees and head to Lockheed Martin to begin their careers, they’re aiming for success because of preparation received at Tennessee State University.

Career Development Center
TSU’s Career Development Center gives students tools they need for success. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Davis and Weatherspoon will be among more than 800 graduates from various disciplines on May 6 at the undergraduate commencement in the William Jasper Hale Stadium on TSU’s main campus.

The duo continues the university’s legacy of students who have received job offers and are ready to move right into the workforce.

Weatherspoon, 24, who majored in electrical engineering, will take an electrical engineering associate position. She will work in programming at Lockheed Martin’s Space Systems Company in Littleton, Colorado.

Lockheed Martin recently received a $100 million contract from the U.S. Air Force to support efforts related to the Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile, or JASSM.

“Having a job after I graduate is a blessing,” said Weatherspoon, a Memphis, Tennessee native. “I’m very excited.”

Davis, a 23-year-old computer science major from Nashville, will head to Lockheed Martin’s Orlando, Florida, location where she will work on a logistics system for one of the company’s fighter jets.

Davis said she is nervous about relocating, but shares Weatherspoon’s sentiment about already having a job: “It’s exciting.”

Both students, and others, credit faculty at TSU and programs like the university’s Career Development Center with motivating them and providing the tools they needed to not only get their jobs, but be successful.

“The professors at TSU were reliable and very helpful,” said 22-year–old Mathew Smith of Nashville. The agricultural education major is currently a high school student teacher, and plans to teach full time after he graduates in May.

“It’s been quite rewarding,” Smith said of student teaching. “And honestly, the most influential and experience learning I’ve had throughout TSU.”

Meghan Lambert, a nursing major from Bolivar, Tennessee, has a job lined up with Methodist University Hospital, which has also agreed to pay for her post-graduate degree.

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The TSU Women’s Center’s Link to Success program connects students with professionals in the workforce. (photo by Lucas Johnson, TSU Media Relations)

She said Link to Success, a program in TSU’s Women’s Center that connects students with professionals in their field, said the networking was beneficial.

“It put me in contact with employers,” Lambert said. “I feel like my hard work at Tennessee State University really paid off.”

Jamal Coleman is coordinator of marketing, technology and communications at the Career Development Center, which helps students with their resumes, and provides tips on interviewing techniques, among other things.

“Our main goal is to help them get a foot in the door,” Coleman said. “It’s a great satisfaction when I hear about students getting these opportunities.”

Along with Lockheed Martin and Methodist, other companies where TSU students are going, and are currently working include Bank of America, Boeing, BMW, Raytheon and Rolls-Royce.

Dr. Bethany King Wilkes is director of student services in TSU’s College of Engineering. She said each semester students in the department “consistently receive lucrative job offers from top companies across the nation.”

“I frequently get calls from companies wanting to recruit our students because they know we have a pool of highly skilled individuals qualified for technical jobs that are hard to fill,” Wilkes sad.

TSU’s undergraduate commencement will begin at 8 a.m. Nationally-syndicated radio personality Tom Joyner will be the keynote speaker.

Graduate commencement service will be on May 5 at 5 p.m. in the Howard C. Gentry Complex. Congressman Jim Cooper will deliver the address.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

TSU Economic Development Center to Hold 3rd Annual Financial Literacy Conference

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s Center for Entrepreneurship and Economic Development will hold its 3rd Annual Financial Literacy Conference on Friday, April 21.

Fin LItFlyerfor instaThe one-day conference at the Avon Williams Campus is expected to bring together banking and economic development experts, tax planners, and the mayor’s Office of Economic Opportunity and Empowerment.

They will discuss alternative financing, understanding credit, budgeting, student loan management, steps to buying a home, and causes of bankruptcy, among other topics.

Organizers say the conference will benefit people from all walks of life, including students, people looking for business ideas, retirees and those approaching retirement.

“From saving for a college education, retirement planning, many people feel extreme financial anxiety and are looking for guidance and actionable plans,” said Dr. Ruthie Reynolds, executive director of CEED. “This conference will help to identify and explore some of those answers.”

The conference, which begins at 8 a.m. in the Atrium, is free and open to the public.

Sponsors include Capstar, Fifth Third Bank, Regions Bank, United Way, Suntrust, NAFI, Woodbine and the Small Business Development Center. They will set up tents and displays with giveaways.

For more information and how to register for the conference, go to https://2017financialliteracyconference.eventbrite.com or call 615-963-7130.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

‘Donor Appreciation’ Gives Scholarship Recipients Chance to Say ‘Thank You’

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Leona Dunn is finally enjoying college life and stressing less about school fees. She is grateful.

“My first year in college I paid over $1,200 out of pocket from what I saved up over the summer to help me stay in college,” said Dunn, a junior communications major.

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TSU President Glenda Glover says scholarship donors help the university stay on the path of excellence. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

That experience was the beginning of some tough times for the Omaha, Nebraska, native who had just come out of foster care. She was barely able to keep up with the payment plan she had worked up, which made registering for the next semester even more difficult.

“My balance was still off,” Dunn said. “I had no one back home to help. And coming from foster care, the system doesn’t exactly just give children owned by the state full ride scholarships to anywhere even if they had an exceptional GPA and ACT score like I did.”

But thanks to some “nice people” and “great organizations,” Dunn is now worrying less about tuition and focusing more on her academics. She received financial assistance from the Links, and the Tennessee State University Women’s Center.

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Leona Dunn gave a Spoken Word rendition at the Scholarship Appreciation Program and Reception. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

“With all of this help I had to come up with only $200 this year …a huge blessing. I am so grateful,” she said.

On Friday, April 7, Dunn, and fellow students who receive help through scholarship donations, had a chance to say, “Thank You.”

It was the 6th Annual Scholarship Appreciation Program and Reception, or “Donor Appreciation,” held in Kean Hall. The event, organized by the TSU Foundation, allows scholarship recipients to meet face-to-face with donors to thank them for their generosity.

TSU President Glenda Glover said scholarship donors help the university to stay on the path of excellence by ensuring that students receive quality education through their gifts.

“Because of you, our students are able to matriculate,” Glover said. “They get to come, they get to stay and they get to graduate because of your dollars. We are just so grateful.”

Donors Reception
Scholarship recipients enter Kean Hall with cheers and songs of appreciation for donors who have helped them stay in school. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

This year, nearly 280 people, including students, donors and special guests attended the program featuring songs, recognition of donors and a special toast. Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, vice president for Research and Institutional Advancement, provided remarks.

Eloise Abernathy Alexis, associate vice president of Institutional Advancement, said the program gave the students a “unique opportunity” to interact with the donors.

“We send out postcards, letters and notes to donors to show our appreciation for their gifts, but this is the moment when donors and students really get to come together face to face to give and receive appreciation,” Alexis said.

Dr. Darlene Harris-Vasser, assistant director of Donor Relations, coordinates the reception each year. She said it is exciting to see the joy on donors’ faces when they meet the students in person.

“They are just so elated to see all of those students speaking about their educational goals, future plans and how their (donors’) contributions are making it possible for them to achieve their goals,” Harris-Vasser said.

The Women’s Center, one of the donors that offered Dunn financial assistance, develops and sponsors programming that enhances the skills of women and assists in their development as scholars and professionals.

According to Seanne Wilson, director of the center, Dunn approached the center to inquire about assistance.

“As Leona is a huge supporter of the Women’s Center and its events, the center was happy to assist her with the request,” Wilson said.

In appreciation, Dunn wants to give back to help others.

“Hopefully I want to have my own endowed scholarship when I become an alumna to help others and give back for the help I received,” she said.

For information on how to support the TSU Foundation or make a scholarship donation, please go to http://www.tnstate.edu/foundation/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU graduate students receive invitation to publish in UNC-Charlotte UERPA Journal

By K. Dawn Rutledge

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service)  – Tennessee State University graduate students received some sound advice on how to become better writers from two top scholars regarded as leaders in their fields, and received the gift of a major opportunity to get a jump-start on their publishing careers.

Dr. Chance Lewis
Dr. Chance Lewis

University of North Carolina at Charlotte professors, Dr. Chance Lewis, a Carol Grotnes Belk Distinguished Professor and Endowed Chair of Urban Education and director of the UNC-Charlotte Urban Education Collaborative, and Dr. Stephen Hancock, associate professor of Multicultural Education with the Urban Education Collaborative, were invited to TSU as part of Title III’s Graduate Student Speaker and Workshop Series created by Dr. Andrea Tyler, director of Graduate Student Services.

Lewis and Hancock have crafted highly efficient research programs that tap into the writing strengths of graduate students to maximize their publication output. They shared their expertise March 28 and 29 with graduate students, undergraduate students and faculty revealing strategies on how to find passion, eliminate distractions, practice self-discipline, and reduce stress in the writing process.

“You have to understand the why related to becoming a strong and prolific writer,” Lewis said, adding that students should discover what they are passionate about. “Something must bother you so much that your why is focused on solving that issue. You must have a takeover mentality, a desire to be a key contributor in your field and be the best at it.”

During the presentation, Lewis, founder and editor of the Urban Education Research & Policy Annuals (UERPA), a graduate student journal published annually by the Urban Education Collaborative UNC-Charlotte, spontaneously offered TSU an entire special edition journal for master and doctoral-level TSU students to submit empirical and theoretical research in areas related to urban education. Founded in 2012, the UERPA is a double-blind peer-reviewed journal published once a year, and includes original articles, brief reports, and book reviews in the areas of educational reform, educational equity for underrepresented groups, racially diverse perspectives, multiculturalism, teacher education models, student achievement, urban school populations, and academic and social needs for urban students, among other topics related to research, policy, or practice in urban education.

TSU’s Dr. Andrea L. Tyler, director of Graduate Student Services and Research Associate, will oversee the process.

“This TSU special themed issue will provide an in-depth analysis of the educational issues in urban settings and how K-12 and higher education professionals and stakeholders can work to promote student success, academic achievement, and increase access to higher education to improve the academic achievement of students in urban educational settings,” said Tyler, who has already established a pilot research writing group for TSU graduate students.

“The pilot writing group is for graduate students who can make a serious commitment to writing and publishing in their respective fields,” she added. “The goal of the program is to help strengthen students’ writing abilities, provide a structural environment to refine skills and, most importantly, publish.”

Erin Carney, a first-year Ph.D. student in the Counseling Program, said the writing seminar helped to rekindle her interest in publishing as a graduate student.

Dr. Stephen Hancock
Dr. Stephen Hancock

“Like most higher education programs, Ph.D. programs at TSU are demanding on your time and energy,” said the West Lafayette, Indiana native. “Drs. Lewis and Hancock gave practical advice on how students can balance being productive with the other aspects of our lives. They reminded us that, when we are overwhelmed with school obligations, we have to stay focused on what we came here to do – change our field for the better.”

Academia is highly competitive, and publishing often determines which doctoral students stand out and separate themselves when seeking academic positions and advancing in their respective fields. TSU offers doctoral degrees in seven areas: biological sciences, psychology, public administration, curriculum and instruction, educational leadership, computer information systems engineering, and physical therapy.

“[In academia] You will only be known by what you produce,” Lewis said. “You have to build a brand of your scholarly work.”

The Graduate Student Speaker and Workshop Series also focused on faculty engagement with a session for faculty advisors centered on increasing the efficiency of publishing by using the writing strengths of students.

Dr. Clara Young, chair of the TSU Department of Teaching and Learning in the College of Education, said she thoroughly enjoyed the concepts and ideas shared by the presenters.

“One of the major challenges in a graduate program is scholarly writing,” Young said. “Many graduate students enter graduate studies with limited experience in scholarly writing. As such, it becomes the responsibility of faculty to help students develop scholarly writing skills. I believe the Graduate Writing Seminar provided perspective on how faculty can begin to facilitate the scholarly writing process with graduate students.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

 

 

TSU to host Community Health and Wellness Fair

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is hosting a Community Health and Wellness Fair on April 21 that organizers hope will motivate people to live healthier lives.

The event, which is free to the public, is a partnership between TSU, the DP Thomas Foundation for Obesity, Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s HIV Vaccine Program, and the Turnip Truck, a natural foods grocer in Nashville.

The fair is scheduled to start at 10 a.m. in the university’s Kean Hall on the main campus. More than 30 vendors with some connection to health care and wellness are expected to participate.

Among its offerings, the fair will provide information on weight loss management and nutrition, as well as fitness demonstrations and health screenings, including hypertension, glucose and cholesterol.

One of the main participants is TSU’s Dental Hygiene Department, which has a full service campus clinic that averages about 600 patients a year, many of whom are from the surrounding community.

Dr. Gary-Lee A. Lewis, head of TSU’s Dental Hygiene Department, said he hopes the fair will help increase that number “with the linkages that we make with the community.”

“It’s a mutually beneficial experience for both our students and value for the community,” Lewis said. “It showcases all aspects of health to the community.”

Vic Sorrell is the community engagement coordinator for the Vanderbilt HIV vaccine program, which he said will offer HIV testing and HIV prevention education and information at the health fair.

“This is an ideal way for our community to collaborate on reaching the goal of zero new HIV transmissions by the year 2020, according to the National HIV/AIDS Strategy,” Sorrell said.

For more information about the Community Health and Wellness Fair, call 615-474-1286, or email: dpthomasfoundation@gmail.com.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Winston wins prestigious ATHENA Young Professional Award

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) — Dr. Tameka Winston, interim chair of Tennessee State’s Communications Department, recently received the 2017 ATHENA Young Professional Leadership Award.

The Nashville ATHENA Awards and Scholarship Program announced its 2017 award recipients last month at OZ Arts Nashville. Mayor Megan Barry was a special guest at the event, which also recognized eight students who received $17,000 in scholarships.

The Nashville Athena Award Program recognizes professional women for their business success, community service and encouragement of other women.

Winston was chosen from among 25 nominees selected this year by Middle Tennessee organizations and associations. The nominees were under the age 40 and making significant contributions in the Nashville community. Winston was nominated by Women in Higher Education in Tennessee.

An author and Sirius XM radio show host, Winston uses her platforms to serve as a mentor to, advocate for and inspire students and young adults in Nashville and nationally. She also received the 2017 Nashville Business Journal’s Women of Influence Award earlier this year.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU Board of Trustees holds first meeting

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s Board of Trustees held its first meeting since being confirmed by State lawmakers.

The meeting, organizational in nature, was held Thursday, April 13, on the main campus in Hankal Hall, and was open to the public.

TSU President Glenda Glover provided opening remarks and welcomed the new trustees along with Governor Bill Haslam and members of the Tennessee Higher Education Commission (THEC).

“This is an exciting time for the TSU family as we begin this new phase in the life of the University,” said President Glover. “On behalf of all of our stakeholders, we thank this esteemed group of individuals for their commitment and dedication to serve as trustees of our institution.”

Action items included selecting the board leadership and the student trustee. Dr. Joseph W. Walker III, pastor of Mt. Zion Baptist Church of Nashville and presiding Bishop of the Full Gospel Baptist Church Fellowship, International, was selected as chair and corporate executive Dr. Deborah A. Cole as vice chair. Cole is president and CEO of Citizens Savings Bank and Trust Company in Nashville. Nashville native Sydnie Davis was appointed as the student trustee to round out the mandated 10-member board.

TSU’s board is part of the governor’s Focus on College and University Success (FOCUS) Act, which requires the state’s six public four-year universities to be governed by local boards.

“This is an historic day for Tennessee State University and is something that we as a state have talked about and thought about for a long time,” said Governor Bill Haslam. “The TSU Board of Trustees is a group of highly accomplished individuals who are completely focused on the perspectives of the students, faculty and alumni and are committed to moving the university forward,” Haslam added.

Members also adopted bylaws and formed the following committees: executive, audit, academic affairs and student affairs, and finance and budget.

The board meeting’s agenda and materials are posted as they are available at http://www.tnstate.edu/board/meetings.aspx. To see bios of the board members, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/board/trustees.aspx.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.