All posts by Lucas Johnson

Mother of injured TSU football player Christion Abercrombie says he plans to return to school

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – TSU student-athlete Christion Abercrombie continues to amaze following a severe head injury in a football game. He may be back in the classroom soon.

His mother, Staci, recently stated at a press conference in Abercrombie’s hometown of Atlanta that he intends to return to Tennessee State University to complete his degree in sports management. She did not say exactly when.

The linebacker was injured in a game against Vanderbilt University on Sept. 29. But since then, he has made an incredible recovery.

In October, Abercrombie was transferred from Vanderbilt University Medical Center to the Shepherd Center, a rehabilitation facility in Atlanta. He was released from there last month, and continues to make progress. He spent some time with TSU President Glenda Glover when she visited Atlanta earlier this month.

Abercrombie’s mother has said her son’s improvement to where he is now is a “miracle.”

“We’re very grateful to God for what He’s already done and for what He is going to continue to do,” she said.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Civil rights activist Dr. William Barber II speaks at MLK Day Convocation at TSU, urges action against injustice

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University honored the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., on Monday with a convocation that featured prominent civil rights activist, Dr. William Barber II.

The annual event at TSU’s Gentry Complex is in collaboration with the Interdenominational Ministers Fellowship and the Nashville community. Leading up to the convocation, hundreds of people gathered in front of Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist church and marched to the Complex.

TSU President Glenda Glover, Nashville Mayor David Briley, participate in MLK Day march. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relationss)

Before Barber spoke, attendees heard from TSU President Glenda Glover, newly-elected Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee, Congressman Jim Cooper, Nashville Mayor David Briley, and American Baptist College President Forrest Harris, among others.

“I greet you in the name of excellence and in the name of service,” Glover said. “Service is what this holiday is all about. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., said, ‘Everybody can be great, because anybody can serve.’”

In his speech, Barber said that Dr. King was “more than just words,” but action. And like King, people should actively look for ways to address racism, poverty, and other social ills, instead of just talking, or preaching, about them.

Dr. William Barber II and TSU Student Trustee Braxton Simpson. (Submitted photo)

“We make a dangerous mistake to suggest that his words were just soaring oratory,” said Barber, national co-chair of the Poor People’s Campaign. “He preached … not only within the quarantine of a sanctuary, but he preached and acted in the streets of the nation. So when we remember Dr. King, it’s not enough to talk about celebration or his oratory. And it’s not enough to say Dr. King just wanted everybody to come together. No, he didn’t. He wanted folks to change. His articulation was turned into liberation.”

Even though Barber is national co-chair of the Poor People’s Campaign, the Goldsboro, North Carolina, pastor is probably best known for his Moral Monday alliance of more than 200 progressive organizations. Over the past six years, that statewide movement has fought for voting rights, public education, universal health care, environmental protection, the rights of women, labor and immigrants, and members of the LGBTQ community.

“What Dr. King wanted was for us to get away from left verses right, conservative verses liberal, and to find a moral center,” Barber said Monday.

Sparrow Haynes, a junior Nashville native, volunteers at Hadley Park Regional Center as part of Joint Day of Service honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (Photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

On Saturday, TSU hosted the MLK Joint Day of Service with seven other universities and colleges that performed service projects across Metro Nashville.

Sparrow Haynes, a junior human performance sports science major with a concentration in exercise science at TSU, volunteered with a group of students who assisted staff at Hadley Park Regional Center by sanitizing various areas of the facility and setting-up for a father-daughter banquet scheduled for that evening.

“I feel like it is important for us to keep Dr. King’s legacy going,” said Haynes, a Nashville native. “I feel like we should give back just like he did for us.”

To learn about TSU’s Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/servicelearning/

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Mourns Loss of former Coach/AD William “Bill” Thomas

Courtesy: TSU Athletics

NASHVILLE, Tenn.  (TSU News Service) – The Tennessee State University family is mourning the loss of former coach and director of athletics William “Bill” Thomas who passed away on Friday, Jan. 18.

“The TSU family and community mourn the passing of Coach William ‘Bill’ Thomas,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. “We send our heartfelt condolences to his wife, Gayla, his daughter, Tosha, and his entire family. We were so delighted that we got a chance to honor him as one of our honorees during the 2017 Homecoming festivities. His memory and legacy will live on.”

Thomas was an assistant football coach under the legendary Big John Merritt and served as head coach from 1984-88. He led TSU to an 11-0 record in 1984 and guided the Big Blue to a 10-2-1 finish and to the second round of the NCAA Championships during his tenure.

He compiled a career record of 34-20-3 at Tennessee State and coached current head coach Rod Reed.

After transitioning to the role of Athletics Director, a position in which he held for eight years, Thomas hired Teresa Phillips as the head women’s basketball coach. Phillips, who now serves as TSU’s Director of Athletics, won two OVC Championships at the helm of the Lady Tiger program

“I’ll be forever grateful to him,” Phillips said. “My heart goes out to his wife Gayla and their daughter as well as his TSU teammates and the student-athletes whose lives he touched. We’ve lost one more of our great Tigers.”

Thomas, who played on the Tennessee State football team from 1967-70, also served as the head coach at Texas Southern from 1994-2003.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU celebrates legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with ‘Day of Service,’ Convocation featuring Dr. William Barber II

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will remember the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with a MLK Day of Service and Convocation featuring prominent civil rights activist, Dr. William Barber II.

TSU will host the MLK Joint Day of Service with seven other universities and colleges on Saturday, Jan. 19. Participants will gather in Kean Hall at 10:30 a.m. before leaving to perform service projects across Metro Nashville.

On Monday, Jan. 21, TSU will join the Interdenominational Ministers Fellowship and the Nashville community in celebrating the slain civil rights leader. Hundreds of people are expected to assemble in front of Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church at 9:30 a.m. to march to TSU’s Gentry Complex for its annual Convocation honoring King. The Convocation is scheduled for 11 a.m.

Barber will be the keynote speaker at this year’s Convocation. Even though he is national co-chair of the Poor People’s Campaign, the Goldsboro, North Carolina, pastor is probably best known for his Moral Monday alliance of more than 200 progressive organizations. Over the past six years, that statewide movement has fought for voting rights, public education, environmental protection, and the rights of women, labor and immigrants.

“He has a very large platform,” said Dr. Learotha Williams, an associate professor of history at TSU. “He’s doing things in the spirit of Dr. King. I’m looking forward to hearing him speak.”

Shirley Nix-Davis, director of outreach for TSU’s Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement, is one of the organizers of the MLK Joint Day of Service. She said TSU seeks to honor the legacy of King every day through its motto: Think. Work. Serve.

“One of his quotes is, ‘everybody can be great, because anybody can serve,’” said Nix-Davis.

To learn more about TSU’s Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/servicelearning/.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

President Glover visits TSU football player Christion Abercrombie in Atlanta

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover recently traveled to Atlanta to visit football player Christion Abercrombie, who is making a miraculous recovery.

TSU President Glenda Glover and Christion Abercrombie. (Submitted photo)

Dr. Glover spent time with Abercrombie this past weekend. The linebacker suffered a severe head injury in a game against Vanderbilt University on Sept. 29. But since then, he has made an amazing recovery.

In October, Abercrombie was transferred from Vanderbilt University Medical Center to the Shepherd Center, a rehabilitation facility in Atlanta. He was released about three weeks ago, according to TSU athletic officials.

On Dec. 16, Abercrombie went home for a little while to watch NFL games with his family. A few days later, he attended a special day in his honor at his alma mater, Westlake High in Atlanta.

Abercrombie is now at home, which his mother and others say is a “miracle.”

“We’re very grateful to God for what he’s already done and for what He is going to continue to do,” said Staci Abercrombie, Christion’s mother.

A GoFundMe has been set up to help Christion and his family. To donate, visit www.gofundme.com/tennessee-state-univ-athletics-dept.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU football player Christion Abercrombie continues to make ‘miraculous’ progress

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University football player Christion Abercrombie continues to be an inspiration.

Christion and his mother, Staci, at recent church service. (Submitted photo)

The linebacker suffered a severe head injury in a game against Vanderbilt University on Sept. 29. But since then, he has made a miraculous recovery, and is now at home.

In October, Abercrombie was transferred from Vanderbilt University Medical Center to the Shepherd Center, a rehabilitation facility in Atlanta. He was released about two weeks ago, according to TSU athletic officials.

On Dec. 16, Abercrombie went home for a little while to watch NFL games with his family. A few days later, he attended a special day in his honor at his alma mater, Westlake High in Atlanta, according to media reports.

At that event, Abercrombie’s mother, Staci, asked for continued prayer for her son, whom she called a “miracle.”

“We are very grateful for each and every one of you,” she said. “Because of God and your prayers, our son is here today. He is a miracle. This is a journey and it’s not over, but we’re very grateful to God for what he’s already done and for what He is going to continue to do.”

Now, Abercrombie is home for good. He recently attended a service at his church.

Said a recent Tweet featuring Abercrombie and members of his family: “Prayer changes things!”

A GoFundMe has been set up to help Christion and his family. To donate, visit www.gofundme.com/tennessee-state-univ-athletics-dept.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

New scholarships, higher research designation highlight spring Faculty and Staff Institute

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover welcomed back faculty and staff on Monday to news of more scholarships for students and national recognition in research.

TSU President Glenda Glover speaks at spring 2019 Faculty and Staff Institute. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Dr. Glover informed employees at Monday’s Faculty and Staff Institute for the spring semester that TSU will be receiving millions of scholarship dollars under the recently passed U.S. Farm Bill, and that the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education moved the university up to an elite R2 designation in research.

“These are exciting times for TSU as we create our on future,” said Glover. “I’m proud to serve as president of TSU. Thank you for all you do.”

TSU is among 19 land-grant universities that will each receive millions of dollars under the Farm Bill, most of which will be used for scholarships, according to Tennessee State officials.

The availability of scholarship funds in the legislation is significant, officials say, because previous Farm Bills restricted the money to research and extension.

“This is really a landmark occurrence,” said Dr. Alisa Mosley, interim vice president for Academic Affairs at TSU. “Because of the work of the HBCU presidents and lawmakers, a great deal of that money is going to be directed to scholarships, which helps students progress.”

Mosley said TSU hasn’t been told exactly how much it’s receiving, but she said it’s “in the millions.”

TSU employees attend Faculty and Staff Institute. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The Farm Bill also authorizes the establishment of three Centers of Excellence among the land-grant HBCUs, as well as legalizes hemp production, which will greatly benefit TSU because of its current nationally recognized hemp research.

TSU’s College of Agriculture has charged a team of scientists to develop hemp production practices for Tennessee. The research projects include developing hemp nutritional products for human consumption and studying the economic viability of hemp production in the state.

Currently, the university is growing and evaluating at least 10 varieties of hemp.

“The advantage for us is that we’re already in the game,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture. “There are private entities within Tennessee that have been lobbying the state Legislature (on hemp), and they have been in contact with us.”

As for the new Carnegie designation, TSU officials say the upgrade will make the university more competitive among its peer institutions.

There are three Carnegie classifications: R1 (highest research activity); R2 (higher research activity); and R3 (moderate research activity).

Of the 102 historically black colleges and universities, 11 (including TSU) now have a R2 designation. TSU is among four of the state’s six four-year public institutions with that designation.

“There’s a recognition that we’re doing good scholarly research that will support our academic endeavors,” said Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, vice president for Research and Institutional Advancement at TSU. “I think it will help raise our reputation, our visibility. I’m excited.”

For more information about TSU’s College of Agriculture, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/agriculture/.

To learn more about research at TSU, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/research/admin/contact.aspx.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

Percussionists from TSU’s famed Aristocrat of Bands perform in Rose Parade

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Percussionists from Tennessee State University’s famed Aristocrat of Bands recently performed in the Rose Parade in Pasadena, California.

Submitted photo

Honda Corporation of America invited eight percussionists from last year’s Honda Battle of the Bands to perform in an all-star drum section for the annual parade on Jan. 1.

The percussionists are: Keyuna Bufford (senior), Jackson, Tennessee; Quintin Burton (senior), St. Louis; Delvecchio Christian (senior), Memphis; Richard Freeman (sophomore), Birmingham, Alabama; Floyd Ivy (sophomore), Memphis; Devin Pride (junior), Atlanta; Brian Watson (freshman), Nashville; and Evan Armstrong (sophomore), Nashville.

The students were guided by Derrick Greene, assistant band director who was head drum major for the Aristocrat of Bands in 2015-2016.

The band, one of TSU’s greatest ambassadors, made its eighth appearance in the Honda Battle of the Bands last year.

In 2014, the AOB became the first collegiate band ever to perform at halftime of the NFL Pro Football Hall of Fame game. The band and university made national headlines again in 2017 by accepting a special invitation from former President Barack Obama to perform on the White House Lawn.

And in 2018, the band performed with country music megastar Keith Urban during the singer’s tour stop at Bridgestone Arena in Nashville.

To learn more about the Aristocrat of Bands, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/aristocratofbands/.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Legacy of TSU alum, adjunct professor Getahn Ward continues through scholarship

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A year after his death, Getahn Ward continues to be remembered, and those who were close to the Tennessee State University adjunct professor do not expect him to be forgotten.

Sunday, Dec. 16, was the one-year mark of Ward’s death. He was a longtime adjunct in TSU’s Department of Communications and a proud alum of the university. He was also a business reporter at The Tennessean for nearly 20 years.

Shortly after his death, a scholarship in the Communications Department was set up in Ward’s name, and the department’s multimedia newsroom was also named after him.

The new scholarship is the first endowed scholarship in the history of the department.

“This scholarship represents a man who devoted much of his life to the field of journalism and to the education and success of students at Tennessee State University,” said Dr. Tameka Winston, Communications Department chair, and associate vice president of Research and Institutional Advancement.

Dr. Karen Dunlap, a former TSU adjunct professor and colleague of Ward, said the impact he had in the classroom and in the community as a reporter is “lasting.”

“He left an excellent impression,” said Dunlap. “The scholarship is important because it is a name that will remain before students. And they will learn about him; they will have a model in him as they go forward as journalist.”

Dwight Lewis, a former Tennessean editor who worked with Ward, agreed.

“He gave his all,” said Lewis. “I hope students will look at his life and say, I want to be like Getahn Ward.”

To contribute to the Getahn Ward Endowed Scholarship Fund, visit

https://epay.tnstate.edu/C20204_ustores/web/classic/product_detail.jsp?PRODUCTID=401&SINGLESTORE=true.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

High achieving sophomore seeks to help others obtain success, excellence

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – When she was in high school, Amiya Ingram motivated her peers to be successful. Come graduation time, she wanted to find a higher education institution that would do the same, and Tennessee State University won her heart.

“I felt the family-oriented environment as soon as I came to tour TSU,” says Ingram, now a sophomore. “I knew it was the place for me.”

Amiya Ingram

A native of Huntsville, Alabama, Ingram fully embraces TSU’s tagline: “Excellence Is Our Habit.” The mechanical engineering major has a 3.3 grade point average, and she’s also a member of the Aristocrat of Bands’ Royal Elegance Flag Corp. Her freshman year at TSU, Ingram was selected to be a member of the Ron McNair Scholars Program, as well as the Blue Scholars Entrepreneurship program.

She says what she likes most about TSU is the care and concern she receives from administrators and faculty. Despite their busy schedules, they make time to listen to students, to mentor them.

“I have a good relationship with my dean,” says Ingram, who is a former president of the TSU chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers. “You get to have one-on-one relationships with people that are usually hard to get to.”

Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College of Engineering, says there’s more to students’ “education than in the classroom and laboratory.”

“We hope to develop a more complete TSU graduate, one that possesses leadership skills, has a global consciousness and awareness, and technical competence,” says Hargrove. “Ms. Ingram demonstrates that educational journey as an engineering student, and we believe she reflects the mission of Tennessee State University … to Think-Work-Serve!”

Dr. Reginald McDonald, director of the famed Aristocrat of Bands, agrees with Hargrove, which is why he sends his students a motivational quote each morning.

“I want them to know that I am like them in that I had a lot of professors/teachers who took interest in me as a person,” says McDonald.

Ingram says she appreciates McDonald’s attentiveness.

“He treats us like we’re his kids,” she says. “He keeps my head up, keeps me going.”

Ingram says such attention by Hargrove, McDonald and others at TSU motivates her even more to do what she can to assist fellow students, like helping them find internships.

“I’ve had a few internships,” says Ingram, who will be traveling to New York City this summer to intern at Bank of America in global information systems technology.

“I like to help people find internships that match them, or research opportunities. I also try to act as an encourager for people.”

Ingram says she also enjoys community activities similar to the prom dress drive she initiated her senior year in high school.

“We basically got everyone to bring in their old prom dresses, and we gave them back to the community,” says Ingram, adding that such events also serve as a recruitment tool by “creating a personal relationship with individuals who are thinking about attending Tennessee State University.”

Ingram is among a new recruit of high achievers the university is targeting to attract the best and brightest students, since TSU raised its admission standards about two years ago. Minimum requirements for incoming freshmen went up from a 2.25 GPA to 2.5, while the ACT score remained at 19.

Ingram says she loves the changes TSU is making, such as recent groundbreakings that include construction of two new residence halls and a state-of-the-art Health Sciences Building.

She says she constantly boasts about the university because she wants prospective high school graduates to experience the “excellence” that she now does.

“Tennessee State University has been a stepping stone to success,” says Ingram. “I brought my hard-work mentality to the university and they provided the opportunity, and for that I say thank you.”

To learn more about TSU’s College of Engineering, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/engineering/.

To read more about the Aristocrat of Bands, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/aristocratofbands/.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.