All posts by Lucas Johnson

Health and Wellness Fair at TSU exposes community to healthy options

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – More than 40 vendors participated in another successful Community Health and Wellness Fair at Tennessee State University on Friday.

Personal trainer and nutrition coach Tay Sweat talks to fair attendee. (photo by Lucas Johnson, TSU Media Relations)

The fair, which was in TSU’s Kean Hall on the main campus and free to the public, is a partnership between Tennessee State, the DP Thomas Foundation for Obesity, Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s HIV Vaccine Program, and the Turnip Truck.

Fair attendees got opportunities to receive massages, chiropractic care, dental screenings, HIV testing and more.

Among the fair’s highlights was internationally recognized vegan trainer Tay Sweat, who at one point in his life weighed more than 300 pounds, and battled diabetes and high blood pressure. Afraid he would meet an early death, Sweat decided to take control of his health.

“I got rid of my diabetes and my high blood pressure, and from there I started helping others do the same,” said Sweat in an interview before Friday’s event.

During the fair, Sweat shared his story with attendees, and invited them to stop by his booth to discuss eating healthier. He said one of his challenges is dispelling misconceptions about being vegan.

Fair attendees participate in floor exercise. (photo by Lucas Johnson, TSU Media Relations)

“I want to show people that you can be vegan, you can be healthy, you can be strong, and you can heal internally by eating the right foods,” said Sweat, whose clients include some of the Tennessee Titans NFL players, and surgeons at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

Sweat added that his excessive weight, diabetes and heart disease went away when he switched to a plant diet.

“Maybe it’s not a medication you’re looking for; maybe it’s plants you’re looking for to get rid of what you’re trying to deal with,” said Sweat.

Arvazena Clardy, assistant professor in horticulture and extension in TSU’s College of Agriculture, helped give away free plants to encourage people to try growing food.

TSU Horticulture Department preparing plants to give away. (photo by Lucas Johnson, TSU Media Relations)

“We’re just trying to get people to eat healthier,” said Clardy. “We also have the community garden at TSU, so I try to give plants to get people interested in growing plants.”

TSU’s College of Health Sciences had a number of faculty and staff at the fair to help with screenings and other health checks, such as blood pressure.

The university’s Dental Hygiene Program, which is part of the College of Health Sciences, gave oral cancer screenings and offered participants free teeth cleaning at TSU’s Dental Hygiene Clinic, which provides service to nearly 600 patients a year, including students as well as the Nashville community.

Leon Roberts, coordinator of clinics for the Dental Hygiene Program, said events like the fair are important because they provide the community with needed exposure to healthy options.

“It’s important for the community to know all the different resources and vendors that they can go to for nutrition and health,” said Roberts.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Members of Hamilton High School state championship basketball team visit TSU

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Members of the State Champion Hamilton High School boys basketball team visited Tennessee State University on Thursday and got a chance to talk with the university’s new basketball coach, and other faculty.

TSU men’s basketball coach Brian “Penny” Collins with members of some of the Hamilton High School state champion boys basketball team. (photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

The Memphis, Tennessee, team, which recently won the TSSAA Class AA title, was honored at the state Legislature before coming to TSU, where they were treated to lunch with administrators and other faculty, including new TSU men’s basketball coach Brian “Penny” Collins, who is also from Memphis. The young men also met TSU’s mascot.

During his talk with the players, Collins said basketball is a great skill to have, but they should also get a great education.

“That ball will stop bouncing one day,” said Collins. “You have to get your education, get your degree. And then along the road, it will provide you with opportunities to make your dreams come true.”

At least two of the high school players say they plan to attend TSU after graduating in May.

“I heard it’s a great school,” said Martarius Tate, who plans to major in business. “I want to have my own company.”

Markwon Kirkland said he’s also heard TSU is the place to be.

“I just feel like it will give me a good experience,” he said.

Hamilton High basketball coach Will Smith said he’s glad some of his players want to attend TSU. He said he and his wife helped put a former high school player through TSU about five years ago. He said that student has since graduated, and is successful.

“It’s a great campus,” said Smith, who, along with some of his coaching staff, really appreciated TSU’s hospitality.

“The support and how do things around here is just first class,” said Smith.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Tennessee State University landscape to change in upcoming months with construction of five new buildings

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The Tennessee State University campus landscape will soon be changing. Nashville’s only public university will become a carbon copy of Music City in the next couple months as it begins construction of five campus buildings. This means construction cranes, dirt trucks, and hard hats.

TSU President Glenda Glover says the new buildings will enhance student living and improve their learning environment.

“The new projects are part of a long-term plan to improve academic programs and increase our residence hall inventory while enhancing the overall status of the university,” adds President Glover.

“We are extremely excited about the future and the new look our campus will take on with the construction. It’s been a long time coming for our students, faculty, staff and alumni.”

On slate for construction is a new Health Sciences Building, two new residence halls, the Field Research Organic Laboratory, Gateway Arch Entrance, and Alumni House and Welcome Center. Plans for several of the projects were unveiled last fall to kick-off the university’s homecoming celebration. All of the projects must be approved by the State Building Commission (SBC).

In addition to the new buildings, the university is also planning a nearly $5 million enhancement to Hale Stadium, according to Dr. Curtis Johnson, TSU’s chief of staff.

“We’re in the process of planning what that will include,” said Johnson.

Viron Lynch, TSU’s director of capital initiatives, said the Health Sciences Building is in the design phase.

“The Health Sciences building is the farthest along in the construction process, and a building designer has already been selected for the residence halls as well,” said Lynch.

“Depending on contract negotiations, design will begin within the next two months.”

The College of Agriculture is to get the new food sciences building. That project is also waiting for SBC approval, Lynch said. Also awaiting SBC approval is the TSU Alumni House and Welcome Center.

Johnson said it’s an exciting time at TSU.

“President Glover and her leadership has been working very hard with the various constituents to enhance TSU,” he said. “We’re excited about all the things that we’re going to bring for the students, the faculty, and the alumni.”

The following is a breakdown of each project:

  • The new Health Sciences Building is funded and in-design. The estimated cost of the project is $38.8 million. Groundbreaking is anticipated to occur in October 2018. The estimated completion date of the project is August 2020.
  • Two new residence halls are funded and the design team has been selected. The estimated project cost is $75.2 million. Groundbreaking could occur as early as October 2018. The estimated completion date of the project is August 2020.
  • The Field Research Organic Laboratory has received funding and is in-design. The estimated cost of the project is $340,000. Groundbreaking is anticipated to be in October 2018. The estimated completion date of the project is December 2019.
  • The Gateway Arch has been funded and currently in-design. The estimated cost of the project is $650,000. Groundbreaking is anticipated to be in October 2018. The estimated completion date of the project is August 2019.
  • The Alumni House and Welcome Center is currently in the development phase. The estimated cost of the project is $1 million. Although the project is in the planning phase, a groundbreaking could occur as early as January 2018, with a possible completion date of August 2020.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Top Regions executive gives TSU students tips to success

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A top financial executive visited Tennessee State University on Tuesday and gave students some valuable advice on how to be successful in the workplace, and life.

Leroy Abrahams, area president of Regions Financial Corporation, spoke to students in the Faculty Dining Room of Floyd Payne Campus Center. Most of the students were business and finance majors, but the event was open to all students.

TSU President Glenda Glover thanked Abrahams for coming to the university, which has a long relationship with Regions.

“We’re just proud and pleased to welcome Mr. Abrahams to our campus,” said Glover. “We thank Regions for their commitment to TSU. This is a special relationship.”

Abrahams has more than 30 years of banking experience and is ranked in the top 100 of the more than 20,000 employees at Regions. In that top 100, he is one of only two African Americans.

Abrahams said before the event that he wants students to understand that they’re going to face adversity, but that they should persevere, because they can achieve their objective.

“Most of the times our careers won’t go on a straight path,” he said. “Sometimes there’re deviations. But as long as there are opportunities to learn and grow, then that’s OK. It doesn’t have to be a straight path.”

TSU business finance major Carl Fisher said he’s glad Abrahams took time out of his busy schedule to talk to students.

“I want to get some tips so I can one day be in the same place as he,” said Fisher, a freshman from Atlanta.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU part of Sista Strut to raise awareness about breast cancer

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will be part of the route of the Sista Strut 3K, which seeks to raise awareness about breast cancer.

The event on Saturday, April 21, will start at 8 a.m. at the Hadley Park Bandshell and Green Space near TSU.

Sara Whittemore, Nashville event coordinator for iHeartMedia, said organizers wanted to incorporate historical sites on the route and decided to include TSU.

“We really waned to work TSU into the route to be on campus to incorporate the Olympic Torch and other things to show the history” of the university, said Whittemore.

According to the Sista Strut website, its goal is to increase awareness about the issues of breast cancer, particularly in women of color, as well as provide information on community resources.

Studies show that African American women are more likely to get breast cancer at a younger age and have a death rate from the disease twice that of Caucasian women of the same age.

“Sista Strut recognizes the strength of survivors, their family and friends, heightens awareness, promotes early detection and the search for a cure,” according to the website.

TSU employee Lalita Hodge said she plans to attend the event and is glad Tennessee State is involved.

“I believe by coming on the university campus it will pull in the younger generation, and the younger women to make them more conscious of their bodies, and what they need to do to keep it healthy,” said Hodge.

For more information about the Sista Strut or to register, visit https://racesonline.com/events/sista-strut-nashville

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU scholarship recipients say ‘thank you’ to donors during Appreciation Program

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University scholarship recipients got a chance to say “thank you” to their donors on Friday.

Scholarship recipient Nijaia Bradley with donor, Dr. Sandra Holt. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

During a Scholarship Appreciation Program in Elliott Hall, students lined up to thank those who helped make it possible for them to attend TSU. A number of donors attended the event, which is in its seventh year.

TSU President Glenda Glover personally thanked the donors for their contributions in her greetings.

“Thank you for coming out and your support to TSU,” said Glover, who has an endowed scholarship at the university. “You make a significant different in peoples lives.”

Nijaia Bradley of Detroit said it’s simple; she wouldn’t be at TSU if she had not received scholarships.

“College wasn’t a possibility,” said Bradley, a sophomore majoring in child development. “I’m blessed to be here at TSU.”

Like many of the scholarship recipients attending the event, Bradley got a chance to meet her donor, Dr. Sandra Holt. It was her first time meeting Holt, who has a scholarship in her name.

“I just want to thank her,” said Bradley. “Without her scholarship, I wouldn’t be here.”

Holt said it’s a wonderful feeling to know her scholarship is helping a student to be successful.

“When you meet young people like this, who are eager to do … it’s worth whatever it takes to see these young people make it,” said Holt, a former director of TSU’s Honors College. “That’s why I give.”

Junior Madison Brown of Memphis, Tennessee, said the scholarship he received from the TSU Foundation made it possible for him to get a higher education..

“I wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for you,” said Brown, a computer science major who has an internship with Google. “I appreciate you a lot.”

Ben Northington, director of fiscal affairs for the TSU Foundation and institutional advancement, said more than 650 students received scholarships this year totaling close to $2 million.

“We look forward to our donors interacting with the students who have benefited from their respective scholarships,” said Northington. “This event is to tell each of our donors thank you.”

For information on how to support the TSU Foundation or make a scholarship donation, please go to http://www.tnstate.edu/foundation/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Agriscience Fair provides opportunities to learn, recruit

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Students from area high schools got a chance to showcase their agriculture projects at Tennessee State University’s inaugural Agriscience Fair on Thursday.

Ali Bledsoe, a ninth-grader from Clarkrange High School in Fentress County, receives a check for $500 for taking first place in the plant science category. Presenting the check are Dr. Samuel Nahashon, chair of the Department of Environmental Sciences, left; Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture; and Dr. John Ricketts, TSU Ag professor and fair organizer. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Close to 100 students in grades 9-12 participated in the event sponsored by TSU’s College of Agriculture. The students, from 11 counties, made presentations in categories that included food and nutritional sciences, plant sciences, animal sciences, agricultural engineering and biotechnology. The presentations in each category were judged, with first place winners receiving $500, and $250 for second place.

While the fair was a chance for students to showcase their work, organizers said it was also an opportunity for students to see what TSU has to offer, and hopefully draw them to the university.

“There’s so much out there we do in terms of research, in terms of addressing national priorities,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of TSU’s College of Agriculture. “A lot of times the young people in the school systems don’t know that. So we’re trying to get them to our place … and see how we can blend their goals with what we have here.”

Dr. John Ricketts, a TSU Ag professor and organizer of the fair, said the students got a chance to interact with some of the College of Agriculture’s faculty and discuss topics related to their areas of interest.

“So, in addition to recruiting, it’s really helping them with their research interest in the areas they’re studying,” Ricketts said.

Tenth-grader Elise Russ showcases presentation on diabetes and eating healthier. Russ says she plans to attend TSU. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Elise Russ, a 10th-grader from Hillsboro High School in Nashville who was a presenter at the fair, said she plans to attend TSU and major in agriculture. She said she’s been inspired to work in that field after spending time gardening with her grandmother.

“I like agriculture,” said Russ, whose presentation was about diabetes and eating healthier. “I used to always be in the garden with my grandmother; I just loved doing that with her.”

One of the winner’s at the fair was Ali Bledsoe, a ninth-grader from Clarkrange High School in Fentress Country. She got first place in the plant science category for her presentation about “organic matter in the soil.”

Bledsoe said a large part of her interest in agriculture is due to her older brother, who was in Future Farmers of America, or FFA.

“He introduced me to this,” said Bledsoe, who is also in FFA. “He did a project sort of like this his freshman year.”

To learn more about TSU’s College of Agriculture, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/agriculture/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Inaugural AgFest kicks off week of college activities at TSU

By Joan Kite

Nashville, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – More than 100 students, staff, and faculty members attended the College of Agriculture’s inaugural AgFest at Tennessee State University on Monday.

TSU College of Ag Dean Dr. Chandra Reddy (right), and horse trainer Jerry Williams, Jr., wth his Tennessee Walking Horse. (photo by Joan Kite, TSU Media Relations)

The event took place on the university’s main campus in the circle in front of the College. Participants were treated to opportunities to feed goats, pet a Dexter bull, take selfies with a prancing Tennessee Walking Horse, examine scientific equipment, and mingle with friends.

“It’s a beautiful day,” said Lauren Stevens, an agriculture graduate student who attended with her fellow classmates.

Ag Professor John Ricketts, who organized the visit by horse trainer Jerry Williams, Jr., and his Tennessee Walking Horse, also arranged to have the Agricultural Education Mobile Laboratory parked on the Circle. The classroom on wheels provides mobile lessons about agricultural literacy.

Emily Hayes, a graduate student and assistant with the College’s nationally recognized goat research, said before AgFest that she was looking forward to it.

“The AgFest is a great opportunity for people to actually see all … these groups together, and see all of the work we’ve done as an entire ag department,” said Hayes.

Earlier this year, the U.S. Department of Agriculture awarded more than $2 million in teaching, research and extension capacity building grants to seven TSU Ag professors.

The funds will be dedicated to developing research and extension activities designed to increase and strengthen food and agricultural sciences through integration of teaching, research and extension.

AgFest marks the beginning of events all week at the College of Agriculture. On Tuesday, students participated in the Amazing Race, an agricultural scavenger hunt. On Thursday, high school students were to participate in the College’s first Agri-science Jackpot Fair, where a $500 first place and $250 second place prize will be awarded.

To learn more about TSU’s College of Agriculture, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/agriculture/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Children’s day event a learning experience for youngsters and TSU students, organizers say

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Youngsters from several local schools and day cares will converge on Tennessee State University’s indoor practice facility on Wednesday, April 11, to participate in activities leading up to the Week of the Young Child.

Each April, the National Association for the Education of Young Children designates a week to focus on children. This year, April 16-20 is designated.

TSU’s Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, which is part of the College of Agriculture, and TSU’s Center for Learning Sciences is hosting the event during College of Agriculture Week.

Dr. Margaret Machara, associate professor of human sciences, is the coordinator of TSU’s Day of the Child event, which involves participation from a number of the university’s departments.

She said students and faculty in each department have been asked to develop activities for the children related to their respective areas of study. Organizers say the event provides a learning experience for both kids and college students, particularly those in a program like early childhood.

“We have college students that get to put into practice the things they are learning with actual children (3 to 5-year-olds) in the community,” says Machara. “So they’re learning on their level, and the children are getting an early grasp on material and getting a love for learning in higher education at the same time.”

Last year, more than 250 kids participated in TSU’s Day of the Child event.

Among them was 4-year-old Gavin, and his mother, Natasha Winfrey, who said the kids seemed to benefit from the activities.

“I think it’s good to get the kids started early, to see all the specialties that are available to them when they get older,” she said.

For more information about the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/agriculture/degrees/family_consumer_purpose.aspx.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Students, researchers showcase projects at 40th annual University-Wide Research Symposium

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s students and researchers showcased their cutting-edge research projects and inventions at the 40th Annual University-Wide Research Symposium April 2-6.

Omari Paul, a Ph.D. candidate in Computer Information Systems Engineering; and Akinwunmi Joaquin, a graduate student in CISE, received 1st place award in oral presentation in the “Graduate Engineering” category. Pictured are, from left, Dr. Michael Ivy, associate professor of neuroscience; Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, vice president for research and institutional advancement; Akinwunmi Joaquim; Omari Paul; and John Barfield, director of engagement and visibility in the Division of Research and Institutional Research. (photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

The symposium, which is largely composed of presentations from the science, engineering, business and humanities disciplines, allowed students to gain exposure and experience as either oral or poster presenters in an evaluative environment with external judges from the Mid-South region.

“This is an opportunity for the students and the faculty to highlight their research,” Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, TSU’s vice president of research and institutional advancement said Friday, the last day of the symposium. “And the areas of research that are presented show the excellence that’s being done at TSU. It’s an exciting day for us.“

Omari Paul, a Ph.D. candidate, and Akinwunmi Joaquim, a master of computer science major, won 1st place oral presentation in the “Graduate Engineering” category.

“It’s something I’m really grateful for,” said Joaquim. “I’m going to use this opportunity to help other graduate students, and just try to give back.

The theme for this year’s symposium was “Establishing a Culture of Research Excellence.”

Dr. Michael Ivy, TSU associate professor of Neuroscience, and John Barfield, TSU director of engagement and visibility in the Division of Research and Institutional Advancement, served as the co-chairs for the symposium, which featured abstracts from 174 students and 40 faculty members.

Barfield said the symposium is important because it prepares students for future research opportunities.

“When our students go to graduate school, they can go research-ready being able to prove that they already know how to do research and that they have worked in a research environment,” Barfield said. “If they are graduate level students about to work on their doctorate, then they will be able to show that they have mastered the rigor of being able to present research at an academic level.”

In other honors at the symposium, Eloise Alexis Abernathy, associated Vice President for Institutional Advancement, was admitted into the  “Million Dollar Club,” for receiving grant money of a million or more in a single year. And Leslie Speller Henderson, assistant professor and Extension specialist, was admitted into the “Blue Jacket Society.”

For more information about the 40th Annual University-Wide Research Symposium visit tnstate.edu/researchsymposium.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.