All posts by Lucas Johnson

TSU showcasing its excellence on the big screen

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is on the big screen.

The university’s Public Relations and Communications department has launched a marketing campaign to promote TSU’s excellence.

The university has placed ads in theaters across the region that highlight the new Executive MBA program, and the return of out-of-state tuition reduction. The campaign is scheduled to run during the summer peak months and will have some promotional features in the theaters’ lobbies as well.

The TSU family is encouraged to support their local theater and catch Big Blue on the big screen.

Here are locations where the ads are currently running:

  • Atlanta, GA, Movies ATL, 3760 Princeton Lake Pkwy.
  • Birmingham, AL, Lee Branch 15, 801 Doug Baker Blvd.
  • Chattanooga, TN, Rave East Ridge Theater, 5080 S. Terrace
  • Springdale, OH, Springdale 18 Cinema DE Lux, 12064 Springfield Pike
  • Clarksville, TN, Clarksville Governor Square 10, 2801 Wilma Rudolph Blvd.
  • Cordova, TN, Malco Cordova Cinema, 1080 N. Germantown Pkwy.
  • Franklin, TN, Thoroughbred Cinema 20, 633 Frazier Dr.
  • Plainfield, IN, Metropolis 18, 2490 Metropolis Way
  • Louisville, KY, Stonybrook Cinemas, 2745 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy.
  • Smyrna, TN, Smyrna 12, 100 Movie Row (I-24 & Sam Ridley Pkwy.)
  • Southaven, MS, De Soto Cinema 16, 7130 Malco Blvd.
  • Nashville, TN, Regal Hollywood Stadium 27, 719 Thompson Ln.,
  • Nashville, Regal Green Hills Stadium 16, 3815 Green Hills Village Dr.
  • Nashville, Regal Opry Mills Stadium 20, 570 Opry Mills Dr.
  • Mt. Juliet, TN, Regal Providence Stadium 14, 401 S Mt. Juliet Rd.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU hosts town hall meeting on mass transit in Nashville area

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University hosted a town hall meeting Thursday evening to discuss mass transit in the Nashville area.

Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of TSU’s College of Engineering, talks about traffic concerns in Nashville. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Television station WKRN held the meeting in the Floyd-Payne Campus Center to look at the ways Nashvillians are evolving in how they approach their daily commute.

“We’re glad that we were able to partner with Channel 2 to make the community more aware about what needs to be done, and how they can be a part of it,” said Kelli Sharpe, TSU’s assistant vice president of public relations and communications.

Nashville is in the midst of historic growth with dozens of new residents arriving daily, which impacts everyone as they traverse their way around the city to work, home and school, transit experts say.

Topics at the town hall included traffic congestion, expansion of mass transit and a proposal for a light-rail system.

A panel moderated by WKRN’s Bob Mueller provided most of the discussion. On the panel was Nashville Vice Mayor David Briley, State Sen. Bill Ketron, a member of the Senate Finance Committee, and Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of TSU’s College of Engineering.

Hargrove said most Nashville residents believe something needs to be done to address the heavy traffic the city is experiencing, but they also realize that cost is a big factor.

“Generally speaking, the residents of Metropolitan Nashville are in favor of paying more for transportation,” Hargrove said after the meeting. “The question is, what would be the source for paying for that.”

Hargrove said TSU’s College of Engineering is “very engaged in the need to improve transportation.” Over the last several years, he said the College has had in excess of a million dollars in research, primarily funded from the Tennessee Department of Transportation.

He said one project the College is working on looks at traffic safety, and another is exploring ways to optimize the logistics of trucks, or freight, coming in and out of the city.

Last year, a team of six TSU graduate and undergraduate students, along with their professors from the Departments of Civil and Architectural Engineering, conducted a study on five bridges around the Nashville fairgrounds to assess their structural integrity.

The students’ findings were submitted to the city’s structural engineers and used to determine future use of the bridges.

To see the town hall meeting and stories about mass transit, visit http://wkrn.com/2017/06/29/town-hall-meeting-planes-trains-and-automobiles-at-630-p-m/.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

TSU has record turnout at Nashville Sounds game, President Glenda Glover throws first pitch

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover threw the first pitch at Wednesday night’s Nashville Sounds game, which had a record college attendance of Big Blue.

TSU President Glenda Glover throws first pitch at Nashville Sounds game. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations))

It was TSU night at First Tennessee Park. Chris Freeman, the Sounds’ director of corporate sales, said TSU sold over 300 tickets, which is the most so far this year for a college or university. Freeman said the closest ticket total was Middle Tennessee State University with 240.

“This is really fantastic for TSU,” Glover said before the game. “To have our own special night, and have record sales.”

TSU alum DaMichael Mclean was among the many Big Blue supporters. McLean said he felt proud to be part of TSU when he saw the university’s section, and all the TSU shirts and hats.

President Glover talks with TSU fans. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“This is a great opportunity to get people out and about to fellowship,” he said.

In addition to Dr. Glover tossing the first pitch, the Commercial Music Ensemble from TSU’s Music Department played pop music from the 1980s, and senior Darien Phillips played a moving rendition of the national anthem on his saxophone.

“It was great playing in front of all the fans; it was a great opportunity,” he said.

The Sounds, who played the Round Rock Express, also gave away a TSU themed Nashville Sounds hat to the first 1,000 fans.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Faculty, staff giving shines light on TSU, attracts donors

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University officials say faculty and staff giving is attractive to donors outside the institution.

When there’s strong financial support internally, donors are inclined even more to give because they see how much employees value where they work, said Greg Ketteman, prospect researcher with the TSU Foundation.

He said TSU’s College of Engineering recently reached 100 percent giving.

“Donors ask what the giving rate is for insiders and take that into consideration when making their own gift,” Ketteman said. “Being able to say that 100 percent of faculty and staff have given is a powerful statement when raising money from alumni, corporations, and foundations.”

Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College of Engineering, agreed.

“The faculty and staff of the College of Engineering strongly support the leadership of the institution, its college, and more importantly, the students by their contribution to the TSU Foundation,” he said.

TSU student Brandi BeCoats said she appreciates the generosity from TSU’s faculty and staff.

“When people choose to give to the university, what that says to me is that the university is something that’s worth investing in,” said BeCoats, a junior from Nashville.

As of June 19, 2017, Ketteman said 159 TSU faculty and staff have made a donation to TSU, a 31 percent increase over last year. He said this year’s gifts from faculty and staff total $53,043, which is close to last year’s record of $53,565.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU awarded $2 million job placement grant for students

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) -Tennessee State University graduates look to have an advantage entering the workforce due to a $2 million career development grant from the United Negro College Fund.

Staff with the university’s career development center believe the funding will give them the tools to prepare and ultimately help TSU graduates secure employment immediately.

“We want to make sure that when they graduate, they’ll have jobs,” said Tina Reed, associate director of TSU’s Career Development Center.

A number of students who graduated from TSU in May had jobs waiting for them. Most of them credited faculty at TSU and programs like the university’s Career Center with motivating them and providing the tools they needed to not only get jobs, but be successful.

One of those students was 24-year-old Cametria Weatherspoon, an electrical engineering major from Memphis, Tennessee, who is now working in programming at Lockheed Martin’s Space Systems Company in Littleton, Colorado.

“Having a job after I graduate is a blessing,” she said.

Besides TSU, UNCF also awarded a $2 million grant to Morgan State University and Norfolk State University.

Each year, UNCF awards more than 10,000 students scholarships worth more than $100 million. It provides financial support to 37 historically black colleges and universities.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU to host town hall meeting on transportation in Nashville

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is hosting a town hall meeting to discuss transportation options in Nashville.

The event, which is open to the public, will take place on Thursday, June 29, at 6:30 p.m. in the Forum in the Floyd-Payne Campus Center.

Television station WKRN is holding the meeting to look at the ways Nashvillians are evolving in how they approach their daily commute.

Nashville is in the midst of historic growth with dozens of new residents arriving daily, which impacts everyone as they traverse their way around Music City to work, home and school, according to WKRN.

Topics at the town hall will include expansion of mass transit and a proposal for a light-rail system.

WKRN’s Bob Mueller will moderate the meeting that will have a panel of local transit experts, including the dean of TSU’s College of Engineering, Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, who is expected to discuss the university’s transportation-related research.

Last year, a team of six TSU graduate and undergraduate students, along with their professors from the Departments of Civil and Architectural Engineering, conducted a study on five bridges around the Nashville fairgrounds to assess their structural integrity.

The students’ findings were submitted to the city’s structural engineers and used to determine future use of the bridges.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU participates in bill signing of historic HBCU legislation

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University participated in the signing of historic legislation that will benefit HBCUs across the state.

Gov. Bill Haslam on Wednesday signed the “Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities” that creates an office within the Tennessee Higher Education Commission to focus on HBCUs, public and private.

“Governor Bill Haslam’s signing of the HBCU Initiative is an historic moment for the State of Tennessee and speaks to his ongoing commitment to higher education,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. “Funding this legislation sends a clear message on the important role Tennessee State University and the other historically black colleges and universities play in serving thousands of families, and our global impact.”

A key component of the initiative is a director’s position that will allow a person to be a liaison who fosters a relationship with lawmakers to make them aware of education accomplishments, services and needs of the state’s HBCUs.

The legislation was sponsored by Tennessee Sen. Reginald Tate of Memphis and State Rep. Harold Love, Jr., whose district includes TSU.

Love said the measure is the “first in the nation where the state has said we’re concerned about all HBCUs.”

“Now the state will be focusing on increasing graduation rates, enrollment rates and retention rates at all of our HBCUs,” Love said.

Besides TSU, Tennessee’s other HBCUs are: American Baptist College, Fisk University, Lane College, LeMoyne-Owen College, Knoxville College, and Meharry Medical College.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Tennessee State University a finalist in 10 categories of HBCU Digest Awards

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is a finalist in 10 categories of the 2017 Historically Black Colleges and Universities’ Digest Awards.

The winners will be announced at the seventh annual HBCU Awards ceremony to be held on July 14 in Washington, D.C.

TSU is a finalist for University of the Year, and TSU President Glenda Glover is in the running for Female President of the Year.

In sports, TSU’s track and field All-American Amber Hughes, the Ohio Valley Conference Female Athlete of the Year for 2016-17, is a finalist for Female Athlete of the Year among HBCUs.

In other categories, TSU is up for Best Marching Band; Best Student Government Association; Best Alumni Publication; Best Research Center; Best Science, Technology, Engineer and Mathematics (STEM) Program; Best Nursing Program; and Male Alumnus of the Year.

Finalists were selected from more than 175 nominations from HBCUs across the country.

Last year, TSU received awards for: Alumna of the Year, Dr. Edith Mitchell; Female Coach of the Year, Track and Field Coach Director Chandra Cheeseborough-Guice; and Female Student of the Year, RaCia Poston.

To see all the 2017 HBCU Awards finalists, visit: http://www.hbcudigest.com/2017-hbcu-awards-finalists/.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Late father of TSU President Glenda Glover honored with street naming

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The late father of Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover was honored for his leadership and community service as a civil rights activist.

(l-r) Rev. Lester Baskin, Mrs. Irene Baskin, President Glenda Glover, Councilman Edmund Ford, Jr. Rev. Henry Baskin Jr. pose in front of new street sign named in honor of the late Henry Baskin, Sr., President Glover’s father. (Submitted photo)

An unveiling ceremony in Memphis, Tennessee, took place on Saturday, June 17, to name a portion of Weaver Road after Henry Earl Baskin, Sr. The Memphis City Council earlier this year approved the street naming resolution that was sponsored by Councilman Edmund Ford, Jr. and Councilwoman Patrice J. Robinson.

“My family and I are extremely grateful and humbled by this recognition for our late father,” President Glover said. “He believed in equality for all human beings and was not afraid to stand up for his belief that we were all created equally and deserved to be treated as such. Our success as a family is largely because of our father. He was committed to our family.”

President Glover added that she and her siblings remember the family patriarch working tirelessly for the City of Memphis, putting all six of his children through college. Four of his children attended Tennessee State University. As an inspirational leader, he made it a priority to assist other students in obtaining financial aid so that they could attend college.

Baskin Family at street dedication ceremony in honor of family patriarch Henry Baskin, Sr. (Submitted photo)

Mr. Baskin, a World War II veteran who obtained the rank of master sergeant, devoted himself to a career of community service that began in 1955 when he organized the Weaver Clowns Baseball Club because of racial discrimination. He was denied the opportunity to compete against another all white team. Undaunted, Mr. Baskin became president of the Levi-West Junction Civic Club, and led many marches against discriminatory practices, and for better city services for blacks in the Weaver Road-West Junction area.

Mr. Baskin was also an active member of the NAACP, participating in sit-in demonstrations with prominent civil rights leaders and spearheading the march on downtown Memphis that led to sewage lines and indoor facilities for African-Americans in the Weaver Road-Boxtown area. He also led the march that resulted in better fire and police protection, as well as better roads and streets in the South Memphis area.

For five decades, Mr. Baskin also had a voice in Memphis politics. He was a campaign manager, a precinct director, and worked the polls every election to ensure adherence to voters’ rights.

Mr. Baskin, who was the first black foreman in the Memphis Sanitation Department, was also a juvenile court probation officer for more than 30 years before retiring from the City of Memphis as a zone supervisor, a position he held for 29 years.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU head basketball coach Dana Ford holds third successful summer camp

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – TSU head basketball coach Dana Ford recently held his third summer camp to give youngsters a chance to learn the fundamentals of the game, and just have some fun.

Camp participant Genna Hickerson prepares to make a move. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

About 60 youth ages 7-13 attended the camp held last week in Tennessee State University’s Gentry Complex.

They participated in a number of different drills and games designed to develop their basketball skills and overall understanding of the game.

“Our staff really enjoys being able to serve this community with free camps,” Ford said. “Physical activity is good for the kids, and the most important thing is that we teach them to have fun playing basketball. Hopefully we picked up some lifelong TSU fans along the way.”

Ford’s camp is among close to 40 camps this summer at Tennessee State.

Other camps include the Verizon Innovative Learning Camp (6/5-6/16); CAMA Blues Kids Camp (7/3 – 7/7), Summer Math Academy (7/9 – 7/21), Edward L. Graves Summer Band Camp (6/24 – 7/1), STEM Summer Camp (6/19 – 7/21), and Upward Bound Program (6/4 – 7/7).

For a complete list of summer camps and programs, and contacts, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/events/camps.aspx

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.