All posts by Lucas Johnson

TSU continues implementation of security plan with new police chief and other safety measures

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is continuing to implement its 10-Point Safety Enhancement Plan with the hiring of a new police chief and additional safety measures.

University officials announced March 14 that Gregory Robinson has returned to his alma mater to take the top position. Robinson, who has over 30 years of experience in law enforcement, is coming from Vanderbilt University where he was in charge of the entire police operation on the main campus that included nearly 100 police and security officers.

“I’m extremely honored to have been offered and accepted the position of Assistant Vice President and Chief of Police of this prestigious institution,” Robinson said. “l look forward to carrying out the plan set forth by President Glover that will continue to enhance campus safety, and serve the TSU community.“

TSU President Glenda Glover said the University is very pleased with the experience and qualifications that Chief Robinson brings to the University’s public safety program.

“It was important to have an individual with a vast background in law enforcement, and with specific knowledge of higher education public safety policies and procedures,” Glover said. “Our new chief has an extensive and impressive employment history that will further enhance the work we have already begun as we continue to make the TSU Police Department even better as it serves the campus family.”

President Glover commended Interim Police Chief Anthony Carter for his leadership during his time as head of TSUPD.

“I truly appreciate Carter for his hard work and commitment to the University,” she said.

In addition to hiring a new chief, the campus is now enclosed by more fencing and has new traffic control gates that were installed over the last month. The upgrades are part of the University’s safety enhancement plan instituted last October.

The current fencing initiative is nearly 75 percent complete along the west side of the campus and is scheduled for completion this semester. The first phase was completed in January 2015 and included the campus area facing 33rd Avenue, enclosing several residence halls. The fencing initiative is an effort to curb outside pedestrian traffic.

Another component of the plan being implemented addresses traffic control. New traffic gates with call boxes have been installed at several sites. Additional access control devices are being installed as well. Individuals must swipe an active ID badge for access.

These new measures help to fulfill components of TSU’s 10-Point Safety Enhancement Plan that require individuals to have a current ID to move about on campus, whether on foot, or by vehicle. Last semester, TSU opened a police satellite office in the Student Center and established a Student Safety Patrol.

Visit www.tnstate.edu/safety for a comprehensive list of the safety plan.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU app to provide ‘convenient’ way for students to register for classes

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Class registration will soon be a little more convenient for TSU students.

By the fall, students will be able to use a new mobile app to register, drop and add classes. The app, released in January, is accessible now for Android through the Google store and Apple iOS through iTunes.

TSU Chief Information Officer Tim Warren said software that allows students to register will soon be added to the app.

“They do everything on apps nowadays, so it just makes sense,” Warren said. “I think students are really going to like it. It’s very, very convenient.”

The app, developed by leading software company Ellucian and modified by TSU’s Office of Technology Services, currently allows students to check courses, schedules and grades; access myTSU and eLearn; and even unlock accounts and reset passwords.

Other features include interactive maps of the campus and access to Nashville’s bus schedules. There is also a section for all things athletics, and of course, TSU’s social media sites.

While a number of higher education institutions across the country are using similar apps, TSU is among only a handful of state schools that have such a device.

So far, about 800 TSU students have downloaded the app, Warren said.

TSU student David Johnson said he plans to download it and is looking forward to using it to register for classes.

“It’s going to make it a lot easier,” said Johnson, a junior who is majoring in Health Sciences. “It’s pretty convenient.”

Lexes Harper, a 21-year-old Chemistry major, currently uses a browser on her iPhone to access TSU’s website. But she agrees the app is more convenient, and plans to download it – particularly for registration.

“We can go straight to the app,” Harper said. “It saves time.”

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Senate Education Committee delays vote on legislation that would restructure higher education governance

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – TSU students and administrators gathered at the state Capitol and saw the Senate Education Committee delay voting on legislation that would restructure higher education governance.

The students, along with TSU President Glenda Glover, packed the hearing at the Legislative Plaza on March 2 to hear lawmakers discuss the Focus on College and University Success Act. After some lengthy debate, a vote on the legislation was delayed until next week after committee chairwoman Dolores Gresham attempted to amend the proposal to provide legislative oversight.

Committee members said they wanted more time to review the proposed amendment. TSU distributed a list of questions regarding the Act that highlighted the negative impact it would have on the institution.

The legislation, which is being pushed by Gov. Bill Haslam, had been rapidly moving through the legislative process before the delay. It’s scheduled to be taken up in the same Senate committee on March 9.

TSU student Jordan Spencer attended the Senate hearing and said she was glad to see the bill delayed.

“I’m really concerned as to the benefit it will give to our school,” said Spencer, a 20-year-old biology major. “We need specifics, and there are no projected specifics.”

Aarian Forman, a junior at TSU majoring in business administration, said he believes the strong attendance by students “made a statement to legislators.”

“We will continue  to stand strong as a student body to make sure this bill is not passed, or at least in its present form,” Forman said.

The day before the Senate committee meeting, TSU students and administrators also attended the House Government Operations Committee where the FOCUS Act was also debated. Rep. Jeremy Faison, the chair of the House committee, welcomed the crowd of students and commended them for seeking more information on the legislation.

“Y’all have been extremely respectful, and I’m proud to have y’all in my committee,” said Faison, whose committee advanced the bill with a positive recommendation. He explained to students that his panel could only review the bill; not make changes or kill it.

“What I want you to know, is that regardless of the outcome of the bill, you walk out with your heads high and know that you live to fight another day,” Faison said.

Even though the FOCUS Act is likely to pass the Legislature, TSU students, faculty, and administrators contend it could be hurtful to the State’s only public HBCU.

TSU President Glenda Glover has expressed numerous concerns about the legislation. They include the possibility of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville growing even stronger because it will be left intact while the TBR is dismantled; unnecessary duplication of programs; and probably most important, maintaining an equitable funding process.

“What will the funding formula look like?” Glover said to reporters after the House committee meeting. “The legislation only broadly describes it, but no formula is in place at this point. The (Tennessee) Board of Regents ensures balance. They do all they can to make the playing field fair. “

Currently, the Board of Regents oversees 46 institutions: six public four-year state universities (including TSU), 13 community colleges and 27 technical colleges.

Under the FOCUS Act, TBR would oversee the state’s community and technical colleges only, and focus on promoting graduation rates at those institutions. Haslam has said the legislation is the next step in his “Drive to 55” initiative, which seeks to increase the percentage of Tennesseans with a postsecondary credential to 55 by 2025.

“With 46 institutions, it is difficult for TBR to meet all of the diverse challenges of the system,” according to the governor’s website about the legislation. “Community colleges arguably need greater focus at a system level in the Drive to 55, while TBR’s four-year state universities could benefit from greater autonomy.”

Despite her concerns, Glover said she’s still willing to work with the governor’s office to make the proposal less hurtful to TSU.

“We’ve been in contact with the governor’s office, and we’ve expressed concerns,” she said. “And to their credit, they’ve listened to quite a few of them. I have to be optimistic that we’ll continue to work with the governor’s office to work out the remaining differences.”

The FOCUS bill will have to pass finance committees in the House and Senate before reaching a full vote on the floors of both chambers.

According to the Tennessee General Assembly’s website, the legislation is scheduled to be heard in the House Finance, Ways and Means Subcommittee on March 9 at 10:30 a.m. It’s scheduled for 2:30 p.m. in the Senate Education Committee on the same day.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU delves into governor’s FOCUS Act with students, faculty, administrators and alumni

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover and State Rep. Harold Love, Jr. held a forum at TSU to discuss a legislative proposal that would restructure higher education governance.

Protest-4
TSU student Kyara Murry waits in line with other students to discuss the FOCUS Act, a legislative proposal that would restructure higher education governance. (By John Cross, TSU Media Service)

Students, faculty, administrators, and alumni packed the Floyd-Payne Student Center auditorium on the university’s campus on Feb. 23 to learn more about the Focus on College and University Success Act and express their concerns about the proposal being pushed by Gov. Bill Haslam and that’s advancing in the legislative process.

Love, who represents the university in House District 58 and is also an alumnus of TSU, said he wanted to address concerns about the impact the legislation could have specifically on Tennessee State University.

“I felt it was important to make myself available to answer questions,” Love said before the event. “Tennessee State University has great leadership, students, faculty and alumni and it is my intention to convey their concerns to my colleagues in the Legislature and the Governor’s office.”

Currently, the Tennessee Board of Regents oversees 46 institutions: six public four-year state universities (including TSU), 13 community colleges and 27 technical colleges.

Under the FOCUS Act, TBR would oversee the state’s community and technical colleges only, and focus on promoting graduation rates at those institutions. Haslam has said the legislation is the next step in his “Drive to 55” initiative, which seeks to increase the percentage of Tennesseans with a postsecondary credential to 55 by 2025.

“With 46 institutions, it is difficult for TBR to meet all of the diverse challenges of the system,” according to the governor’s website about the legislation. “Community colleges arguably need greater focus at a system level in the Drive to 55, while TBR’s four-year state universities could benefit from greater autonomy.”

Glover said she has concerns about the legislation, but noted that of the nine amendments the university has proposed to the governor, four have been accepted.

She said one of her main concerns is that the legislation maintains an equitable funding process for all of the four-year public institutions, especially TSU.

“We have a mission that is far different from the other five institutions,” Glover said. “The proposed legislation can’t be viewed as one size fits all. This difference must be recognized. I have communicated these and other concerns to the governor’s office and they are working with us. I remain hopeful that the final legislation will be fair and equitable for our students, faculty, and staff, but most important, our university. We’re going to get through this together.”

Glover said she would be persistent in talking to lawmakers about what’s in the best interest of the university.

“Our university is in the planning stages of implementing FOCUS.  We will host several meetings in an effort to keep the TSU family updated on any amendments to the bill as well as where we are in the implementation phase.”

Protest-3
Rep. Harold Love, Jr. speaks about FOCUS Act and takes questions from the audience. (By John Cross, TSU Media Service)

Another concern is the bill’s makeup of local boards that will oversee the state’s six four-year institutions. Some attending the forum questioned whether the eight members appointed by the governor for the 10-member panels should be handling certain higher education issues, such as schools’ leadership, tuition, faculty tenure, and curricula.

“This bill appears to weaken the institutional leadership of the university and potentially allow a university board to manage the day-to-day operations whereby their credentials and vision may conflict with that of the president of the university, “ said Dr. Samuel Hargrove, dean of TSU’s College of Engineering. “However, if this is the intent of the bill, I am confident TSU will respond strategically to continue its mission and purpose.”

Faculty Senate Chair Michael Catanzaro said he’s received phone calls and emails from the Faculty Senate regarding concerns about the bill and its potentially negative impact on the university.

“Each college and school within Tennessee State University has specific curricula and requirements for diplomas and degrees as determined by accrediting agencies,” Catanzaro said. “The FOCUS bill enables a Board of Trustees that may comprise people with little or no knowledge of accreditation requirements to have the power to develop curricula that may adversely affect the quality of education as well as violate the ‘academic freedom’ of professors.”

Students also voiced their concerns about the proposal, with questions ranging from a name change, available funding for campus improvements, to student involvement on the newly formed university board.

SGA President RaCia Poston said she had spoken with her counterparts regarding student participation with the board on student-related programs, fees, and activities.

“I’ve talked with student leaders from the other TBR four-year institutions and shared my concerns about the student representative being a non-voting member of the board,” Poston said.

“As a legislative intern, I’m lobbying lawmakers during my time at the Capitol on why the student vote should count.”

Love urged everyone to email the governor and lawmakers their concerns, as well as attend legislative committee meetings where the bill is being debated. If the measure passes, it is expected to be fully implemented late next year.

Tennessee State University is the only four-year public institution in Nashville and the only public four-year HBCU in the State of Tennessee. TSU offers 45 bachelor’s degree programs and 24 master’s degree programs and awards doctoral degrees in biological sciences, computer information systems, engineering, psychology, public administration, curriculum and instruction, educational administration and supervision, and physical therapy. In entirety, Tennessee State University comprises eight colleges and schools.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

National Science Foundation representatives educate local faculty, researchers about funding opportunities

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Representatives from the National Science Foundation were in Nashville to tell faculty and researchers at local higher education institutions about research funding opportunities.

NSF-6
National Science Foundation representative Dr. Laura Namy talks to faculty and researchers about research funding opportunities. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Tennessee State University and Meharry Medical College hosted the event that was held Feb. 19 on Meharry’s campus. Participating colleges and universities included American Baptist College, Belmont University, Fisk University, Lipscomb University, Trevecca Nazarene University, and Vanderbilt University.

Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, who spearheaded the event and is TSU’s chief research officer, said the main purpose of collaborating with Meharry was to “strengthen the knowledge base about research funding opportunities among the various faculty members at the different institutions,” particularly historically black colleges and universities.

“In order for faculty members to be successful in attracting research dollars to support what they’re working on, they have to know what’s available to them,” said Crumpton-Young. “And one of the things that’s not commonly shared among HBCUs, or among small institutions, are the opportunities that are available.”

The conference focused on research related to social behavior and economic sciences, “the set of sciences that are related to the human experience,” said Dr. Laura Namy, program director in NSF’s Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences in the Social Behavioral and Economic Sciences Directorate (SBE). The three research divisions within SBE have a total annual budget of over $200 Million.

“The human experience is fundamental to every aspect of society,” said Namy. “And being able to conduct rigorous science to understand the processes by which people experience their everyday lives is really important for being able to both explain and optimize the quality of life for individuals.”

Dr. Orville Bignall, an associate professor of physics at TSU, attended the conference and said he plans to apply for a grant that will help him achieve collaboration between the psychosocial sciences and physics.

“This kind of collaboration will help me to get a process in place to help my students to navigate the proper channel that will help them to be more successful,” said Bignall.

Last year, TSU set a record with $51 million in new research awards. The university recently got a $350,000 grant from NSF to enhance its computing, network and security capacity. Crumpton-Young said the university is hoping to break another record this year, “and a big part of that is for faculty members to know what’s available so we can write those proposals and get funding.”

Dr. Maria de Fatima Lima, dean of Meharry’s School of Graduate Studies and Research, said Meharry and TSU currently have a partnership grant in cancer research and she hopes to see future collaborative efforts to inform faculty and researchers about funding.

“What I would like to see is for us to find other areas of common interest and expand this partnership,” Lima said. “We hope to see the faculty collaborating in research programs and enhancing the research of both schools.”

The National Science Foundation, headquartered in Arlington, Virginia, is the funding source for about 24 percent of all federally supported basic research conducted by America’s colleges and universities.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

District Attorney General Glenn Funk Touts Safety at Colleges, Universities

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Nashville District Attorney General Glenn Funk says he wants to work with the state’s colleges and universities to help keep them safe.

Funk spoke at a Crime Stoppers meeting hosted by Tennessee State University on Feb. 11. The meetings are held at a different regional higher education institution or police facility each month, and allow security officials from various law enforcement agencies to come together and share information about criminal incidents that have occurred at surrounding colleges and universities.

“We try to collectively look at the crime that’s happening in our area,” said Thomas Jackson, commander of TSU’s Police Department and the meeting’s organizer. “And brainstorm about what we can do to make our universities and colleges more safe for our students, faculty and staff.”

In the case of TSU, Funk said the DA’s office has designated a person to be a liaison between the university and his office. He said if there’s a criminal issue on the campus, TSU’s leadership can go to that person and they can make prosecutorial decisions together.

“Whatever the issues are, the only way that we can effectively prosecute cases is to make sure that we have an understanding with law enforcement, or with security, in order to make sure that everybody is on the same page going forward,” Funk said. “One of the reasons I wanted to come out here and talk to this group is I want to make sure that every one of your individual agencies knows, my door is open.”

Other issues at the meeting included efforts to educate students about domestic violence, as well as fraudulent activity.

“The sad thing with domestic violence is a lot of them don’t even know the warning signs,” said Aerin Washington, TSU’s crime prevention officer.

She also said a lot of students fall victim to fraudulent activity, like credit card schemes.

“We see quite a bit of it on campus,” Washington said. “And so there’s definitely room to educate our students about just avoiding the risks that are associated with those activities, and just educating them on how to prevent being victim.”

Funk said he plans to attend future Crime Stopper meetings.

“Hopefully I’ll be coming back to sit and listen,” Funk said before the meeting. “This is kind of where the rubber meets the road when it comes to community safety, and community spirit.”

Besides TSU, other higher education institutions that participate in Crime Stoppers include Aquinas College, Belmont University, Cumberland College, Fisk University, Lipscomb University, Meharry Medical College, Middle Tennessee State University, Nashville State Community College, Trevecca Nazarene College, Vanderbilt University and Vol State Community College.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU job fair helps federal agriculture officials recruit graduates

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University was one of two higher education institutions selected by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to help recent graduates find employment in the agricultural field.

TSU hosted a job fair on Feb. 5 that attracted 60 students from several southern colleges and universities. Alabama A&M University hosted a similar event the day before.

William Hayslett, Sr. is academic coordinator for TSU’s College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences. He said he’s honored that USDA officials selected TSU to host one of the job fairs.

“It says that we’re on their radar, and that they thought we have something to offer,” Hayslett said. “We also want to expose our students to job opportunities.”

The USDA Pathways Recent Graduates Program is a one-year program for individuals who have recently graduated and seek a career development program with training and mentorship. Applicants must apply within two years of degree completion.

The benefit of the job fairs, according to USDA officials, is that they allow individuals to apply on the spot and avoid the online process. It’s also an opportunity to ensure diversity in the selection process, said Marcus Brownrigg, deputy director at the USDA’s Center for Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships.

“We were tasked to see what we could do to increase the number of diverse student interns and recent graduates we brought onboard USDA,” Brownrigg said. “And this is one of the mechanisms that we’ve been using. Going out where students actually are and taking their applications onsite is part of our overall recruitment strategy.”

Recruiters at the TSU job fair took applications for farm loan officer trainees, who undergo a year of training before full federal employment.

Lauren Brewer, who is majoring in international studies at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, said she’d like to get one of the positions. But she said the job fairs are also an opportunity to network.

“It’s a good way for students to come together and network with officials,” said the 21-year-old Brewer. “You just can’t get that through an email or a phone call.”

With more than 100,000 employees and 7,000 offices, USDA provides leadership on food, agriculture, natural resources, rural development, nutrition, and related issues based on sound public policy, the best available science, and efficient management.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Showcases Research, Innovative Programs at Annual Day at the Capitol

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee lawmakers experienced a wave of Tiger Blue at the state Capitol on Wednesday.

20160203_095853 (1)
House Speaker Beth Harwell, left, talks with Dr. Nick Gawel, center, superintendent of the TSU Otis L. Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tenn., and Rep. Kevin Dunlap, D-Rock Island. Dr. Gawel discussed research taking place at the facility with the lawmakers during TSU Day at the Capitol. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations).

Tennessee State University administrators, faculty, students, alumni converged on Legislative Plaza and the Hill to showcase the university’s research and other innovative initiatives at the annual TSU Day at the Capitol.

Displays from the school’s various colleges and departments lined both sides of the hallway in the plaza. Robotics, magnolia trees, research presentations and goats were among the booths showcasing the university’s diverse academic offering.

In the Senate chamber, the site of the kick-off ceremony, TSU President Glenda Glover thanked attendees for their participation and lauded state legislators for the funding they have provided the university. She noted Gov. Bill Haslam’s recent allotment of funding in his budget for a nearly $40 million Health Sciences Building at the institution.

Glover said TSU has been “good stewards of our state funding,” and encouraged lawmakers to continue supporting the university. She said the Day on the Hill is an opportunity to discuss the school’s legislative priorities with lawmakers.

“It’s very important that legislators are aware of our needs,” the president said. “The past and the future appropriations allow TSU to continue its long-standing legacy of providing a quality education to our most important customer and client, our students.”

Senate Speaker Pro Tem Bo Watson, R-Hixson, was among several state lawmakers who spoke to those gathered in the Senate chamber. He thanked them for being engaged in the legislative process.

“Our system of government is not easy,” Watson said. “Democracy is not easy. It is the battlefield of ideas. And each of us has the right to have our voice heard, and you’re having your voice heard today. And I greatly appreciate you being engaged in that process.”

Rep. Harold Love Jr., a Nashville Democrat whose district includes TSU, said after the kick-off event that he hopes young people in attendance will become more interested in the legislative process, and even try to have a voice in policymaking.

“When we talk about active citizen engagement and forming policy, this is a prime example of what we would like to see from all of our students at colleges and universities across the state,” Love said. “This is what citizens are supposed to do, come down and be actively involved in policy formulation when laws are being passed or proposals considered.”

RaCia Poston, president of TSU’s Student Government Association, was among a number of students who participated in the special TSU day and one of 17 TSU students serving as interns during this session of the Tennessee General Assembly.

While she was motivated by what lawmakers had to say, she was particularly proud of TSU having the opportunity in general to showcase what’s happening at the university.

“A lot of times people only see what the media puts out about TSU,” said the 23-year-old Poston, who is a senior majoring in Social Work. “So for us to be here and show our smiling faces, and everything that we have to offer, from agriculture programs to engineering, I think it does a lot for TSU.”

Prior to the kick-off ceremony, Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey and House Speaker Beth Harwell greeted the TSU delegation to the Capitol and shared their pleasure of seeing such an enormous group. TSU held its first Day at the Capitol in 2014.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU wins 2016 Andrew Heiskell Award for Innovation in International Education

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is being recognized nationally for innovation in international education.

It is one of five higher education institutions across the nation to win this year’s IIE Andrew Heiskell Award.

DSC_8956[4]
TSU students from Saudi Arabia participate in an international festival of culture in Kean Hall. (Submitted photo)
The award showcases the most innovative and successful models for internationalizing the campus, study abroad, and international partnership programs in practice today. It emphasizes initiatives that remove institutional barriers and broaden the base of participation in international teaching and learning on campus.

For the first time, IIE presented a special award in the category of internationalizing Historically Black Colleges and Universities, with the inaugural award going to TSU for its Diversity and International Affairs initiative.

“We are extremely proud to receive this honor, as it speaks to the exceptional work and importance of the Office of Diversity and International Affairs at our institution,” said TSU President Glenda Glover.  “ODIA has done an outstanding job cultivating the international student experience into campus life at TSU. Just as important, the staff has strategically implemented international exchange programs with our academic units to ensure students are prepared to succeed in the global market.”

In 2012, TSU had 79 International students, 36 students participating in study abroad, and one faculty member leading a study-abroad experience, according to the Office of Diversity and International Affairs. Campus leadership created the office to provide cultural collaborative initiatives that support TSU’s strategic goals in producing global leaders. The results have shown the new initiative to be a rapid and astonishing success. In three years, TSU’s international efforts grew to hosting 900 International students; helping 121 students take part in study abroad experiences; enabling 12 faculty members leading study abroad experiences with support from four staff members; entering into MOU’s with 26 universities abroad; and signing a commitment with IIE’s Generation Study Abroad initiative.

“It is a tremendous honor to receive this award,” said Dr. Jewell G. Winn, TSU’s executive director for International Programs and deputy chief diversity officer. “And the fact that we’re the first to be recognized in this new category, makes it even more special.”

IIE President and CEO Dr. Allan E. Goodman said all the programs being honored are worth emulating.

“We recommend these programs as models, and hope they will offer inspiration as well as guidance to professionals on other campuses who share the goal of preparing their students to live and work in today’s global environment,” Goodman said.

IIE will present the awards at a ceremony in California on March 11, 2016 as part of its annual Best Practices in Internationalization Conference for campus professionals, which will be held this year at the University of California, Davis.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
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About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Director of Track and Field Chandra Cheeseborough-Guice receives lifetime achievement award

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University Director of Track and Field Chandra Cheeseborough-Guice is the recipient of the Jimmy Carnes Lifetime Achievement Award.

She received the award from the Florida Track and Field Hall of Fame at a ceremony on Jan.  8 in Daytona Beach, Fla.

“Jimmy Carnes has done a lot for the sport of track and field, and I’m honored that my name is in a conversation with his name,” Cheeseborough-Guice said.

Carnes served as the head coach of the track and field team at the University of Florida before being named head coach of the United States Olympic Team.

Cheeseborough-Guice emerged on the scene in 1975 at age 16, where she won a gold medal in the 200-meter dash in the Pan American Games with a world junior record of 22.77 seconds. She also won the TAC 100-meter championship in a time of 11.13.

The Jacksonville, Fla. native went on to be named to three United States Olympic teams. She placed sixth as a 17-year old in the 100-meter dash in Montreal  in 1976. She qualified for the ill-fated 1980 Olympic team that did not compete because of a boycott. In 1984, at the Los Angeles games, she made Olympic history by running a leg on two gold-medal relay teams and was the silver medalist in the 400-meters.

As a coach, Cheeseborough-Guice has guided TSU to eight Ohio Valley Conference Championships and is an eight-time OVC Coach of the Year honoree.

In 2008, Cheeseborough-Guice was named the sprinter’s coach for the USA Team that competed in the Beijing, China Olympics. USA captured 23 medals that included 10 gold, eight silver and five bronze medals.

In 2009, she served as the women’s head coach for Team USA at the IAAF World Outdoor Championships in Berlin, Germany. Under Cheeseborough-Guice, the team collected 22 medals overall, winning more than any other country to dominate the placing table with 231 points. Team USA registered 10 gold, six silver and six bronze medals, along with several outstanding performances.

During the summer of 2015, the TSU graduate helped guide Team USA as an assistant coach at the Pan American Games in Toronto, Canada. Cheeseborough-Guice worked directly with the women’s sprinters and hurdlers, who took home 10 of the team’s 41 medals at the games.