All posts by Lucas Johnson

TSU Pro Football Hall of Famers Richard Dent, Claude Humphrey to be recognized at Super Bowl LI

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s Super Bowl legacy will once again be in the spotlight when its Pro Football Hall of Famers are recognized at Super Bowl LI.

The National Football League will host Hall of Famers from Historically Black Colleges and Universities “to highlight their achievements and as part of the NFL’s growing relationship with HBCUs,” Troy Vincent, Sr., executive director, Football Operations, said in a letter to TSU President Glenda Glover.

“Tennessee State University has had a number of former players who have been in past Super Bowls dating back to the first one. It’s an extreme honor,” Glover said. “It also speaks to our proud tradition as a University and as an HBCU.”

TSU’s Hall of Famers are Richard Dent, a 2011 inductee and MVP of Super Bowl XX with the Chicago Bears; and Claude Humphrey, a 2014 inductee who played in Super Bowl XV with the Philadelphia Eagles.

Vincent said the HBCU Hall of Famers will be recognized in several ways, including an on-field ceremony prior to kickoff on Feb. 5 in Houston.

“Very few football players make it to the NFL,” Vincent said. “Fewer still reach the pinnacle of our sport: The Pro Football Hall of Fame. Student-athletes at HBCUs represent only a small portion of the college football population, but an amazing 10 percent of all players in the Hall of Fame attend HBCUs.”

TSU’s football legacy dates back to the first Super Bowl in 1967. Then, former TSU Tigers Willie Mitchell and Fletcher Smith appeared as teammates for the Kansas City Chiefs. More than 20 others have followed them over the years. The most recent Super Bowl participants are Lamar Divens (2010); Anthony Levine (2011); and Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie (2014). Former TSU offensive guard Robert Myers was on the Denver Broncos squad that won Super Bowl 50.

Last year, Tennessee State was recognized at the 7th Annual John Wooten Leadership Awards in San Francisco for the number of TSU football players who have gone on to play in Super Bowls.

Altogether, TSU has had 31 Super Bowl appearances. Of the 393 schools with alums in the first 50 Super Bowls, only 55 have more than Tennessee State’s 21.

To see a list of TSU Super Bowl participants, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/pr/news5/superbowl.aspx.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

TSU engineering students are making sure Nashville bridges are safe

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – How safe are the bridges in Metro Nashville that you drive across everyday?

The answer may be in the work Tennessee State University engineering students are doing around the city.

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Kevin Nguyen, a graduate civil engineering major, left, and Abram Musinguzi, a Ph.D. student in systems engineering, are two of six TSU students and their professors that assessed bridges around the Nashville Fairgrounds to ensure their structural integrity. (Courtesy photo)

A team of six graduate and undergraduate students, along with their professors from the Departments of Civil and Architectural Engineering, recently conducted a study on five bridges around the Nashville Fairgrounds to assess their structural integrity.

As part of the fairgrounds improvement project, the students’ findings were submitted to the city’s structural engineers and will be used to determine future use of the bridges.

The dean of the College of Engineering said the involvement of the students in the project is part of Mayor Megan Barry’s “innovative” vision and strategy to get more high school and college students working on real-world projects that enhance their skills and employability.

“TSU and the College of Engineering are playing an integral part of this strategy by providing our students with practical experience that complements their classroom learning,” Hargrove said.

Abram Musinguzi, a Ph.D. student in systems engineering, is the student coordinator on the project.  He said part of the inspections involve measuring the bridges’ dimensions to identify any structural damage, or distress, and compile a report.

“The purpose of the project is to assess if there is any need for renovation or repair of the bridges,” Musinguzi said.

Dr. Farouk Mishu, professor and interim chair of the civil and architectural engineering department, is one of two faculty members who worked with the students.

“These bridges have been here for a very long time,” Mishu said. “We are assessing them to see what kind of remediation we need to do to make them safe. This gives the students real-world experience before they graduate.”

Overseeing the students and their professors’ work was a field engineer from the fairgrounds project management team, who said he is impressed with the student’s skill level and attention to detail.

“What they are doing is pivotal to deciding what kind of money will be spent on either the repairing, the removing or replacing of these bridges,” said Jonathon Schneider of the project management team. “Their performance is remarkable.”

The students’ work is not TSU’s first involvement with the fairgrounds improvement project.

Last year, Hargrove served as a member of the review team appointed by Mayor Barry to make recommendations for the $12 million renovation of the fairgrounds.

Other students on the bridge project were: Kevin Nguyen, a graduate student majoring in civil engineering; and undergraduates SiVon Jiles, civil engineering; Matthew Miller, architectural engineering; Dwight Pullen, architectural engineering; and Darren Evans, civil engineering.

Dr. Catherine Armwood, assistant professor of civil and architectural engineering, was the other faculty member on the project.

For more information about TSU’s College of Engineering, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/engineering/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU’s Office of International Affairs partners with local middle school for International Day

Tennessee State University’s Office of International Affairs will join students and faculty at Margaret Allen Middle Prep on Friday, Jan. 27, as sponsors of the school’s annual International Day.

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Dr. Jewell F. Winn, senior International Affairs officer and deputy chief diversity officer at Tennessee State

The celebration emphasizes the advantages of learning about diverse cultures, study abroad opportunities and the exchange of experiences. This is the first year TSU is partnering with Margaret Allen.

“Throughout the year, we work with middle and high schools to establish a pipeline to post-secondary education,” said Dr. Jewell F. Winn, senior International Affairs officer and deputy chief diversity officer at Tennessee State. “This year we are looking at going to different international days and will set-up displays and show off the different cultures represented at TSU.”

Several of TSU’s international student clubs will lead discussions with approximately 250 7th and 8th graders on food, the arts, clothing, music and other cultural aspects from their diverse countries. Workshops will be facilitated by TSU students with Saudi Arabian, African and Kurdish heritage.

“We are excited to have an African drummer who will join us and do an interactive drum session with the student and teach them about African beats,” Winn said. “In addition, our students who have participated in study abroad opportunities will make poster presentations and share those experiences.”

Andy Mizell, a member of Margaret Allen’s International Day Committee, said the school has hosted an International Day celebration for more than a decade. With a diverse group of about 500 students, 21 different languages are spoken within the school walls.

“It [International Day] has always been amazing to see the diverse population of students come together and give special performances, as well as share in some of the cuisines from their cultures,” Mizell said. “This year will be the best, having TSU as a partner and adding college level performances and workshops for our students, will greatly heighten the International Day experience for them. They are surely never going to forget this one!”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU’s Graduate School hosts first recruitment fair, will offer on-site admission

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s School of Graduate Studies and Research is hosting a recruitment fair on Jan. 28 to showcase its excellent programs, and more.

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Dr. Lucian Yates, III, dean of TSU’s Graduate Studies and Research

The fair, the school’s first, will be held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday in the atrium of TSU’s Avon Williams Campus in downtown Nashville.

In particular, the fair aims to make prospective graduate students aware of TSU’s seven doctoral degrees, 24 master’s degrees and eight certificate programs. Many of the graduate programs will offer on-site and provisional admissions, as long as a transcript is available the day of the event, said Dr. Lucian Yates, III, dean of the Graduate School.

“This is a grand opportunity for advanced degree seekers to meet, talk, and possibly enroll at a ‘one-stop’ event,” said Yates, adding that prospects will be able to interact with faculty, as well as Alumni Association members.

“The administration, faculty, and staff look forward to this opportunity and the possibility of serving future Tigers.”

Yates said the school is also taking advantage of a new Tennessee Board of Regents policy that allows TSU and other state institutions to offer discounted rates to students within a 250-mile radius of their campuses.

Under the new plan, graduate students taking nine credit hours will pay 35 percent less, or $6,176, a difference of about $3,200 from the previous rate.

In publicizing the fair, TSU Graduate School organizers reached out to school districts and other organizations in the states that fall within the 250-mile radius. They are: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio and Virginia.

For more information about TSU’s Graduate School, visit www. Tnstate.edu/graduate.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State helps celebrate the life, legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University partnered with the Interdenominational Ministers’ Fellowship and the Nashville community to help celebrate the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Participants in MLK Day march head to TSU’s Gentry Complex for Convocation. (photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

Hundreds of people assembled in front of Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church on Monday, January 16, to march to TSU’s Gentry Complex for its annual Convocation honoring King.

Before the march, a youth program and rally were held at the church. TSU President Glenda Glover pumped up the crowd by reminding them of the historical role Nashville played during the Civil Rights Movement, as well as the strong participation of youth in that movement.

She said that same fervor should burn within youth today, and she lauded those who came out to honor King.

“We are so thankful that the youth movement is here,” Glover said. “It was youth like you who touched the consciousness of America. That torch has now been passed on to you who are present today. Let’s keep the flame burning.”

Nashville Mayor Megan Barry, who has set a goal to find jobs for 10,000 youth this summer, said part of continuing King’s legacy means not ceasing to act on the things he fought for, like jobs.

“Today is about that speech that he gave so many years ago when he talked about his dream,” Barry said. “But you know what, before that speech, that march was called the march on Washington for jobs and freedom. So today it is about jobs, because we know if they (youth) have paid meaningful internships, that’s going to lead to opportunity, that’s going to lead to hope. Government can’t solve all the problems, but together, we can absolutely have an impact.”

Whether at the youth program and rally, or the Convocation, the collective message of this year’s King Day seemed to be the empowerment of today’s youth at a time of heightened social injustice, said many of the participants. The killing of young, unarmed black men by police has particularly caused tension across the country.

“It really brings to light what’s going on with our young people right now, and what he (King) really wanted for us,” said Avery Davis, who participated in the march.

TSU senior Kourtney Daniels agreed the police shootings, as well as the results of the recent presidential election, have seemingly taken the country back decades. But she said she always looks forward to honoring King, because doing so provides a dose of needed hope.

“It’s just a great day to get together with the community, reflect, and plan for the future,” Daniels said.

The Convocation’s keynote speaker, activist and educator Brittany Packnett, said before her speech that there’s still a lot of work to be done in terms of equality, but that we should all be undaunted, like King was.

“My message is to leave with a spirit of hope, with a spirit of power, and with a spirit of resistance for the work that lies ahead,” said Packnett, a co-founder of Campaign Zero and a member of the President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing and the Ferguson Commission.

Other Convocation participants included Dr. Glover, Mayor Barry, U.S. Congressman Jim Cooper, State Rep. Harold Love, Jr. and Dr. Shawn Joseph, director of Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools.

During the Convocation, the Interdenominational Ministers’ Fellowship presented $1,000 each to TSU, Fisk University, Meharry Medical College and American Baptist College for student scholarships.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

 

TSU President Glenda Glover discusses initiatives to improve retention, graduation rates at spring 2017 Faculty and Staff Institute

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – TSU President Glenda Glover says the university is implementing initiatives to improve retention and graduation rates, and the overall success of its students.

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Dr. Glenda Glover addresses Faculty and Staff Institute, as Dr. Achintya Ray, Faculty Senate chair, and Staff Senate Chair Linda Goodman look on. (photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations).

Glover addressed the Faculty and Staff Institute for the spring 2017 semester on Monday, Jan. 9.

Like any higher education institution, she said TSU has its challenges, but she’s optimistic about what lies ahead for the university because of initiatives that will help it maintain a “legacy of excellence.”

“This is an exciting time,” said Glover, “because the history of TSU is still being written.”

Employees gathered in Kean Hall also heard from Dr. Mark Hardy, vice president for academic affairs; Dr. Achintya Ray, chair of the Faculty Senate; and Staff Senate Chair Linda Goodman, all of whom told faculty and staff they play a roll in the success of TSU.

“Let’s commit ourselves to excellence,” Ray said.

Glover outlined steps TSU is taking to help students graduate – and on time. One key initiative uses eight so-called coaches to help students with their “personal and educational goals,” Glover said.

“They will help students understand their goals, and how to work through barriers,” she said.

At the same time, Glover said the university wants to stay competitive and reputable, which is why it’s implementing higher admission standards. Beginning the fall of 2017, all students must have a 2.5 grade point average and a 19 on the ACT for admission to TSU. The previous admission scores were 2.25 or a 19 on the ACT for in-state students, and a 2.5 or 19 ACT for out-of-state students.

“Quality begets quality,” Glover said.

The president also discussed capital improvement and infrastructure enhancements. They include construction of a new Health Sciences building, as well as plans for new residence halls, and stadium enhancements.

Glover also touted TSU’s nationally-recognized research, which undoubtedly contributed to $54 million in new awards for funding grants last year, at least $3 million more than the previous year.

Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, TSU’s chief research officer, said the millions of dollars the university receives is a result of “faculty members working hard to create innovative ideas.”

“I’m excited that we have new funds that will give us an opportunity to work on some outstanding research, to solve some of the national problems and needs,” Young said.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Tennessee State awarded $2 million grant from UNCF for student job placement improvements

By K. Dawn Rutledge

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University has been awarded a $2 million grant as part of the United Negro College Fund® Career Pathways Initiative.

careerpathwayslogo800hero2The pilot program, made possible through $35.3 million in funding by the Lilly Endowment Inc., will enable selected historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and predominately black institutions (PBIs) to address social and economic issues of minority graduation, unemployment and underemployment.

TSU will use the money to enhance its student career development initiatives.

“The UNCF Career Pathways Initiative Grant will give TSU the capacity to better leverage strategic partnerships between our faculty, staff, employers, entrepreneurs and alumni to impact student career exploration, readiness and access,” said Eloise Abernathy Alexis, TSU’s associate vice president for Institutional Advancement.

UNCF launched CPI in December 2016 through a rigorous and competitive multi-phased grant process that targeted 87 eligible public and private HBCUs and PBIs. In the first phase, UNCF made planning grants to 30 institutions. In the final phase, UNCF chose 24 colleges and universities for implementation grants. Of those schools, 15 will receive awards ranging from $1 million to $1.5 million. Nine of the institutions have been selected for three cluster grants, and will receive up to $6 million to collaborate to achieve shared outcomes.

“These colleges and universities show promise in significantly addressing the urgent challenges facing African-American college students and graduates,” said Dr. Michael L. Lomax, UNCF president and CEO.

Tennessee State is among the cluster recipients working in partnership with Morgan State University and Norfolk State University on a joint effort incorporating learning activities, internship exchanges, and linking students through employer clusters, among other initiatives.

“As we implement a framework to increase career outcomes and opportunities for TSU students, we will add to the national body of knowledge on career pathways, within the context of public, historically black colleges and universities, as part of our cluster engagement with Morgan State University and Norfolk State University,” Alexis said.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

More than 20 TSU students graduate from Collegiate Citizens Police Academy

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Twenty-two Tennessee State University students recently graduated from what’s believed to be the nation’s first Collegiate Citizens Police Academy.

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Nashville Police Chief Steve Anderson speaks to students at academy graduation. (photo by Lucas Johnson, TSU Media Relations)

A ceremony was held Nov. 29 at TSU for students who participated in the second session of the program that exposed them to various aspects of police work, including domestic violence investigation, making split second decisions in a firearms training simulator, traffic stop training, and how the Metro Nashville Police Department uses special resources such as SWAT, horses and canine units.

“They get a chance to see what real police work looks like,” said TSU Dean of Students Frank Stevenson, the brainchild of the academy. “And they’re getting it from one of the top police departments in the country.”

Stevenson said the idea came to him amid the cases of police brutality that have permeated the nation. He joined forces with the Rev. Enoch Fuzz, pastor of Corinthian Missionary Baptist Church in Nashville, to bring the idea to Nashville Police Chief Steven Anderson, who immediately embraced it. In a few weeks, the academy was underway.

Anderson said citizens groups across the nation have formed partnerships with police departments to address issues in their communities. But he said the partnership with TSU is the first of its kind between a major U.S. city police department and a cohort of college students.

“The Collegiate Citizen Police Academy is a unique and valuable outreach program that Nashville appears to have pioneered,” Anderson said. “I am grateful that these students devoted six nights during their fall semester to meet with members of our police department and learn more about us.”

Sophomore Javonte Jefferson said he wanted to be a police officer before participating in the program, but wants to even more after completing it.

“It’s just a real good opportunity to get to know the people who patrol here; to see firsthand how it really is,” said Jefferson, a criminal justice major. “This is what I want to do.”

Mikeria Rebb, a sophomore who is also majoring in criminal justice, said she is now considering police work after completing the academy.

“This inspired me,” she said.

Nashville Police Sgt. Mitch Kornberg, one of the academy’s instructors, said he enjoyed working with the students.

“I want them to understand we are here for them,” he said. “They are a part of our community. They’re important to us, and they shouldn’t feel otherwise.”

Stevenson said the academy’s graduates are eligible to apply for the university’s new Tiger Patrol Program, which allows students to work with TSU police in various areas to help strengthen campus safety.

For more information about TSU’s Collegiate Citizens Police Academy, visit: https://www.nashville.gov/Police-Department/Get-Involved/Collegiate-Police-Academy.aspx

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Prominent Civil Rights Attorney Benjamin Crump to Speak at TSU’s Fall 2016 Commencement

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Prominent civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump will be the keynote speaker at Tennessee State University’s Fall 2016 Commencement on Dec. 10.

Crump is the noted Florida lawyer who represented the families of Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, and Terence Crutcher in police shooting cases that made headlines around the world. Crump was also an advocate in the Robbie Tolan police brutality U.S. Supreme Court case, as well as the Martin Lee Anderson boot camp death case.

benjamin-crump
Civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump speaks at 25th anniversary gala for the National Association of African American Honors Programs held at TSU on Oct. 31. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Last month, Crump was the keynote speaker at the 25th anniversary gala for the National Association of African American Honors Programs held at TSU on Oct. 31.

During his speech, he said that those who see injustice and do nothing help to promote abuse. He told students, in particular, that as future leaders and educators they have a “moral” obligation to help stem out injustices in their communities.

“You’re the ones who are going to have the good jobs, you are going to have the education, you have the talent, and if you don’t speak up for our community, if you don’t stand up for our community, if you don’t fight for our community, then who will,” he said.

Crump is the 73rd President of the National Bar Association, the largest organization of lawyers of color in the world, representing over 60,000 black lawyers, judges, and legal professionals. He has received numerous awards, including the SCLC Martin Luther King Servant Leader Award, and the NAACP Thurgood Marshall Award. Ebony Magazine has recognized him as one of the Top 100 trial lawyers.

“Attorney Crump believes in fighting to preserve the justice that minorities have achieved throughout the civil rights era,” according to Crump’s website.

The commencement is scheduled for 9 a.m. in the Howard C. Gentry Complex on the university’s main campus. More than 600 undergraduate and graduate students will receive degrees in various disciplines during the ceremony at the Howard C. Gentry Complex on the university’s main campus.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Agriculture students excel at Tennessee Academy of Science meeting

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Eleven Tennessee State University College of Agriculture students won awards at the 126th annual meeting of the Tennessee Academy of Science.

More than 300 students and faculty from 10 universities converged on Austin Peay State University in Clarksville for the meeting on Nov. 19.

TSU was well represented with 32 student presentations in various topics, including agriculture, botany, cell and molecular biology, ecology and environmental science, geosciences, and microbiology.

Of the 11 awards TSU students received, four were 1st place; three 2nd place; three 3rd place; and one honorable mention.

Master’s student Jeronimo da Silva was honored for serving as the chair of the Ecology and Environmental Science section, the first time a student served as chair of a section.

The Tennessee Academy of Science seeks to promote scientific research and education in Tennessee. Its 800 members are primarily from academia, with additional members from government and industry.

For more information about TAS, visit http://www.tennacadofsci.org.

To learn more about TSU’s College of Agriculture, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/agriculture/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.