All posts by Lucas Johnson

TSU President Glenda Glover solidifies relationship with Regions Bank and other corporate partners during HBCU Braintrust meeting

By Kelli Sharpe

Nashville, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover is promoting HBCU partnerships with corporate America.

TSU President Glenda Glover

Last week, she attended the National HBCU Braintrust in Washington, D.C., meeting with companies to express the importance of diversity and how historically black colleges and universities can bridge the gap.

“As HBCU presidents, we continue to applaud the visionary leadership of Congresswoman Alma S. Adams, of North Carolina, and the members of the Bipartisan HBCU Caucus for creating a platform that allows me and my colleagues the opportunity to network with corporate leaders,” said Dr. Glover, who moderated a panel with chief diversity officers from top corporations, including Amazon, Pinterest, GM Financial and Dell.

“All are fully committed to strengthening relationships between HBCUs and their companies. This is an enormous victory for our students, who are some of the best and brightest in the country.”

TSU President Glenda Glover with top diversity and inclusion executives at the HBCU Braintrust Town Hall: “The Power of Black Women: Reshaping, Redefining & Diversifying America’s Workforce.” President Glover served as moderator for discussion on the important role HBCUs play in building the workforce. (Submitted photo)

Last year, the Caucus issued the HBCU Partnership Challenge, an effort to promote corporate engagement with HBCUs and the students they serve. Following the challenge, the Caucus conducted a survey to assess current HBCU engagement with corporations. The group then worked with industries to determine how to best recruit and retain diverse talent.

The goal was to identify 10 corporate partners within the first year. Amazon, AnitaB.Org, Dell, Inc., GM Financial, Nielsen, Pandora, Regions Bank, and Volvo Group North America are additional partners that have helped the Caucus exceed its goal.

“Regions Bank is the epitome of a good corporate partner and does an outstanding job of integrating TSU students into various levels of the company,” added Dr. Glover.

The National HBCU Braintrust, Sept. 12-14, included corporate giving, STEM innovation, and scholarships. The Bipartisan HBCU Caucus was founded by Congresswoman Alma S. Adams, Ph.D during the 114th Congress. The Caucus is comprised of 74 members from both chambers and both sides of the aisle.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

More Than 200 Top High School Seniors, Parents Attend TSU Memphis Recruitment Reception

By Emmanuel Freeman

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Kaitlin Mottley is a high achieving high school senior pondering what college or university to attend. She recently attended a program that has her considering becoming a Big Blue Tiger.

Jovon Jones, associate director of recruitment at TSU, talks to students and parents about scholarship requirements and deadlines. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“They said the main things I wanted to hear, like chance for a full ride scholarship, strong academic programs, and their reputation for a great family atmosphere,” said Mottley, a senior at White Station High School, where she maintains a 4.467 grade point average. She also has a score of 29 on the ACT.

The program on Sept. 5 was the Annual TSU Memphis Recruitment Reception at the Sheraton Memphis Downtown for graduating high school seniors and their parents and family members.

TSU’s Office of Admissions holds the reception each year as part of activities leading up to the Southern Heritage Classic between TSU and Jackson State University in the Liberty Bowl.

Kaitlin and her mother, Megan Mottley, were among more than 200 high school seniors from the West Tennessee area and their parents who attended the standing-room-only program in one of the hotel’s reception rooms.

Admissions officials say the goal of the reception is to seek out the best students, nurture them, and graduate them prepared for the global market. It also comes on the heels of sweeping changes TSU President Glover announced in 2016 that raised admission standards to attract the best and brightest student.

“We are going after outstanding students and this reception is usually a major draw for parents and their children, as you can see from this packed room tonight,” said Dr. Gregory Clark, TSU’s director of high school relations and NCAA certification.

He said nearly 80 percent of the students who attended have already met “scholarship requirements.”

“We have already received their scholarship applications, transcripts and ACT scores,” Clark said. To be considered for a scholarship, a candidate must have at least a 3.0 GPA and 21 or higher on the ACT. The deadline to apply is Nov. 1.

Joshua Cannon, who is still considering a major either in electrical engineering or accounting, has met all the requirements and is waiting to get an offer. The Middle College High School senior has a 3.8 GPA and 23 ACT. He was at the reception with his parents.

Like Mottley, Cannon is also encouraged by TSU’s strong family tradition and academic offerings.

“I know going to TSU will be a fun experience and strong preparation for my future,” said Cannon, who has several relatives who attended TSU. “I have already met the criteria and getting a full scholarship will be a big help for me and my family.”

For more information on TSU’s admission requirement, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/admissions/

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

The best in HBCU Bands meets the Best in Country Music, Keith Urban and TSU

By Kelli Sharpe

 NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s Aristocrat of Bands and country music megastar Keith Urban came together during the singer’s recent tour stop in Nashville and the show stopping performance has taken the world by storm.

Keith Urban and head drum major Hassan Moody take flight before landing in splits on stage. (Submitted photo)

The TSU world renowned band, fondly called AOB, was featured as a part of Urban’s closing song, and number one hit “Wasted Time.”  The singer introduced the band to a sold-out Bridgestone Arena.

The crowd roared with each marching step of head drum major Hassan Moody and the 40- member band ensemble. That was nothing compared to the dramatic closing that culminated when both Urban and Moody took flight and landed in splits on stage. The photo and video have gone viral on social media.

Hassan, an Atlanta, Georgia native, said it was a once in a lifetime moment and it couldn’t have happened at any other place than at TSU. After having a day to reflect, the business administration major said it’s something he will always cherish.

“You can’t explain that type of experience; the energy was absolutely unbelievable!” said Moody. “Only at TSU. My band members and I are thankful to TSU and Mr. Urban for the opportunity.”

Submitted photo.

Dr. Reginald McDonald, director of bands, said the request came from Urban unexpectedly, a day before his Nashville appearance.

“The band’s performance was amazing, and the element of surprise for the audience made our appearance even more electric,” said McDonald.

“We truly appreciate Mr. Keith Urban for giving our students and university this type of exposure on a national stage. I woke up to an email about 5:30 Thursday morning from Urban’s associate manager basically saying that he wanted the band to perform with him to his tune “Wasted Time” at his concert Friday night.”

McDonald added he informed band staff about the request and gave specific instructions for them to work out the logistics. He said the students learned a valuable life lesson as musicians.

Keith Urban, TSU Director of Bands Dr. Reginald McDonald, and band staff. (Submitted photo)

“Our students also had an opportunity to see the importance of being ready at a moment’s notice and staying ready for when the call is made. That’s how you shine. Our practice with Keith Urban was less than an hour before performing with him.”

This isn’t the first time TSU’s band has made national headlines or been in the spotlight. The AOB played on the lawn of the White House for President Barack Obama and guests in 2016 and performed at halftime of the 2014 Pro Football Hall of Fame game in Canton, Ohio. Both venues were the first for any college band.

“The university is extremely proud of our students for their spectacular performance with country music star Mr. Keith Urban,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. “The Aristocrat of Bands serves as one of the institution’s greatest ambassadors as they travel around the nation, and even here at home, showcasing the best and brightest student musicians. We are a comprehensive university offering top academic programs and extracurricular activities. This iconic moment where HBCU meets country music could only happen at TSU, Nashville’s only public and most affordable university.”

Please visit the TSU homepage at www.tnstate.edu and social media to view video and photos of the performance.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU alum and Waffle House hero James Shaw Jr. launches new charity

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – TSU alum and Waffle House hero James Shaw Jr. launched his new charity during an anti-violence rally at Tennessee State University on Sunday.

Kids enjoying activities at “Come Together Day” rally at Hale Stadium. (Photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

Called “Come Together Day,” the event kicked off at Hale Stadium with vendors and activities for kids before moving into Kean Hall where there was a celebrity basketball game that included TSU alum and Philadelphia 76ers star Robert Covington.

“We’re so proud of James Shaw Jr. for stepping up to the forefront to launch this effort to bring people together,” said TSU President Glenda Glover, who has set up a scholarship at the university in Shaw’s name. “This is very important to this community, and TSU is an integral part of this community. We’re pleased that we can serve in this role.”

TSU alum and Philadelphia 76ers star Robert Covington talks to referees during break in game Sunday. (Photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

Nashville Mayor David Briley attended the rally and also lauded Shaw’s efforts.

“James has really shown how strong a man he is, and I look forward to working with him as he moves forward in his life and lifts up this community,” Briley said.

Shaw said the mission of The James Shaw Jr. Foundation is to work with other like-minded organizations and community advocates to eradicate violence and address mental health issues, as well as provide support, tools and resources for individuals and families who have experienced severe violence and trauma.

James Shaw Jr. shows off basketball skills. (Photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

“It’s about accountability and caring for one another,” Shaw said Sunday.

Chelsey Dyer of Nashville said she attended the rally with her 5-year-old son, Jeremiah, because she wanted to support Shaw’s effort to make the community safer.

“I think it’s awesome,” Dyer said. “We need to come together and make Nashville the best that it can be. We need more James’.”

Four people were killed and several others wounded on April 22 when a gunman opened fire in a Waffle House in the Nashville suburb of Antioch.

Family members of Waffle House shooting victims receive check from James Shaw Jr. during ceremony at TSU in May. (photo courtesy of TSU Media Relations)

Authorities have said there would have probably been more casualties had it not been for Shaw’s actions. He wrestled a rifle away from the gunman and tossed it over the counter before shoving the shooter out the door.

In May, family members of the shooting victims attended a ceremony at TSU to honor those killed and wounded in the shooting. Shaw presented the victims with a check for more than $240,000. Immediately after the shooting, Shaw set up a GoFundMe campaign with a goal of $15,000. He raised much, much more.

Donations to the James Shaw Jr. Scholarship Fund can be paid through the link below or by mail. Please send to: The James Shaw, Jr. Scholarship Fund at Tennessee State University, Tennessee State University Foundation, 3500 John A. Merritt Blvd. Box 9542, Nashville, TN   37209. Donors can also call, 615-963-5481.

https://epay.tnstate.edu/C20204_ustores/web/classic/product_detail.jsp?PRODUCTID=415&SINGLESTORE=true

Note: Feature photo of TSU President Glenda Glover and James Shaw Jr. by Jon Strayhorn-Media Arts Collective.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU alum and Waffle House hero James Shaw Jr. to launch new charity

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – TSU alum and Waffle House hero James Shaw  Jr. will launch his new charity during an anti-violence rally at Tennessee State on Sunday, Aug. 26.

The event will begin at Hale Stadium and culminate in Kean Hall on TSU’s campus. Activities kick off at 2  p.m., and will include a celebrity basketball game.

Shaw said the mission of the James Shaw Jr. Foundation is to work with other like-minded organizations and community advocates to eradicate violence and address mental health issues, as well as provide support, tools and resources for individuals and families who have experienced severe violence and trauma.

“TSU is honored to be a part of this special event as Mr. James Shaw Jr. launches his foundation to address community issues and concerns that plague our neighborhoods. We are particularly pleased that TSU is a part of this kickoff event,” said TSU President Glenda Glover, who has set up a scholarship at the university in Shaw’s name.

“James could have easily stepped from the forefront and quietly gone on with his life. Instead, he has created a platform that allows him to be a voice for those who feel disenfranchised and have lost hope. His giving of himself speaks to his character and values.”

Four people were killed and several others wounded on April 22 when a gunman opened fire in a Waffle House in the Nashville suburb of Antioch.

Authorities have said there would have probably been more casualties had it not been for Shaw’s actions. He wrestled a rifle away from the gunman and tossed it over the counter before shoving the shooter out the door.

A few months ago, family members of the shooting victims attended a ceremony at TSU to honor those killed and wounded in the shooting. Shaw presented the victims with a check for more than $240,000. Immediately after the shooting, Shaw set up a GoFundMe campaign with a goal of $15,000. However, he raised much, much more.

And he plans to continue the giving with his James Shaw Jr. Foundation.

“We can only make real progress if we work together, stand collectively and care for one another,” said Shaw. “I will never let my life, or those lives we sadly lost, be in vain.”

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU helping Saudi students pulled from Canadian universities continue education

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is taking steps to help Saudi Arabian students pulled from universities in Canada continue their education.

TSU officials announced Tuesday that the University will expedite its admissions process for those students who were recently ordered to leave Canada. Saudi students transferring will receive an immediate reply once all their information is received. Application fees will also be waived.

“We were recently informed of the decision to remove all Saudi students from Canada during this critical time of enrollment and registration and have received numerous inquiries from their friends and family here in Nashville,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. “They are concerned and want our help.”

TSU is among several universities and colleges that are assisting students following Saudi Arabia’s decision to pull those on Saudi-funded scholarships from Canadian schools.

“We will do everything we can to assist any student desiring to continue their education at TSU. The immigration process can be frustrating, so we are here to advise the students on immigration policies and expedite issuing the appropriate documents needed for their transfer here immediately.” said Dr. Jewell Winn, senior International Affairs officer and deputy chief diversity officer at Tennessee State

There were 8,310 Saudi students enrolled in Canadian post-secondary schools from January to May 2018, according to Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s website.

TSU officials will rely on their current Saudi student population to assist them in making the transition easier once students enroll. Records show more than 70 percent of the nearly 570 foreign students at TSU are from Saudi Arabia.

For more information or to apply, visit www.tnstate.edu/admissions.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

President Glenda Glover welcomes freshmen, urges them to stay focused and graduate

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover welcomed new freshmen on Thursday and urged them not to lose focus of their ultimate goal while at TSU – graduation.

“You’re going to enjoy yourself while you’re here, but don’t forget you’re in college,” Glover told the students gathered at the Howard C. Gentry Complex on the main campus. “You’re here to get an education. You are all called to greatness, so be the leaders that God has called you to be.”

Other administrators and student leaders also addressed the freshmen, who will be getting acclimated to the university over the next few days.

Student Government Association President Kayla McCrary told the students they may encounter some obstacles, but to be resilient.

“You may fail a class, or go through periods of distress,” she said. “But don’t give up. Nothing worthwhile is easy to get.”

Freshman Roderick Robinson of Atlanta said he was fired up after hearing from Glover and others.

“I can tell that everybody is ecstatic and ready to learn,” said Robinson, who is majoring in computer science. “I plan on studying hard, finding people in my major and working together to a common goal, and that’s to graduate.”

Dean of Students Frank Stevenson said he hopes other freshmen share Robinson’s enthusiasm, and heed Dr. Glover’s message, particularly in the case of completing their degree.

“The goal is to walk across the stage,” Stevenson said. “I put that in their mind from the day they get here.”

Simone Jones, a double major in mass communications and psychology from Columbia, South Carolina, said she’s excited to be at TSU, and plans to enjoy her experience, one day at a time.

“I’m looking forward to a good year,” Jones said.

For first-year student information, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/firstyear/

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU makes transition from battlefield to classroom easier for veterans with new grant

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will soon implement a new program that will allow veterans to count military training for credit hours when they enroll at the institution.   TSU plans to launch the new initiative this fall with a $69,200 grant from the Tennessee Higher Education Commission.

The program is part of the State of Tennessee’s Veteran Reconnect initiative.

“We owe a debt of gratitude to the men and women that have sacrificed so much for our nation’s freedom, and providing a seamless process for them to pursue their education, during and after their service, is just one of the many ways we can show our appreciation,” said Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover.

“TSU is a certified “Vets Campus” by THEC, and noted as a “Military Friendly” institution by G.I Jobs and several other notable ranking services for this area. We are proud to serve our veterans as they have proudly served us.”

TSU is among 14 Tennessee colleges and universities collectively receiving $889,277 from the Tennessee Higher Education Commission to support programs and services for student veterans at campuses across the state. Through the Veteran Reconnect Grant, THEC will also provide technical assistance to Veteran Reconnect campuses around prior learning assessments for veterans.

The Veteran Reconnect grants are focused on improving the assessment of prior learning for student veterans returning to college. Prior learning assessment (PLA) at colleges and universities examines a veteran’s prior military training and grants equivalent college credit for those skills attained during service. This results in a student veteran completing their postsecondary credential in an accelerated timeframe.

“Earning college credit for military training can be the difference between a student applying to a school, or moving on to the next opportunity,” said THEC Executive Director Mike Krause. “When a veteran is able to use credit for their military training towards their college degree, they are more likely to persist and finish their program of study.”

Institutions receiving the grants will develop and implement improved evaluation processes for translating military training into academic credit, while also ensuring that prospective and incoming student veterans have easy, clear access to the information. Veteran Reconnect aligns with legislation passed last year by the Tennessee General Assembly which directs THEC to develop an online web platform to assist veterans in translating their military experience to academic credit. As part of that effort, institutions receiving grants will map out opportunities already available to students through their campuses.

Veteran Reconnect is part of Governor Bill Haslam’s Drive to 55 initiative to increase educational attainment in the state to 55 percent by the year 2025.

TSU was designated a certified veterans campus in November 2014. The university provides programs and support services to ease veterans’ transition from military service to college life, as well as give them opportunities to learn skills necessary for the workforce.

Fore more information about veteran services call 615-963-7001, or visit http://www.tnstate.edu/records/veteran/.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU Faculty and Staff Fired Up and Ready to Embrace New Academic Year, Challenged to Strive for Greatness

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover welcomed faculty and staff back to the university on Monday, and challenged them to strive for “greatness.”

“This is an exciting time because the history of TSU is still being written,” Glover said at the Faculty-Staff Institute. “We’ve been called to greatness. We are building our TSU legacy.”

She said the university has some challenges, but that they can be overcome by working together.

“It takes all of us to make TSU work,” Glover said. “We are team TSU.”

Part of the president’s discussion was about enrollment, which she said has been affected by the state’s program that offers high school graduates free tuition at a two-year institution in Tennessee, and higher admission standards TSU implemented in 2016 to attract better and brighter students.

She noted the higher standards are paying off because the university is attracting more quality students, including two highly sought after high school seniors from Memphis.

Jayla Woods, a graduate of Whitehaven High School, received nearly $9 million in scholarship offers. A fellow student, Meaghen Jones, got more than $10 million in offers. Both will be at TSU when classes start this month.

“We’ve moved to quality over quantity,” Glover said.

She also pointed out the university is continuing to excel in research, as well as campus growth. In the next few months, ground is expected to be broken on a new Health Sciences Building and two new residence halls.

As for research funding, TSU ended the past year with $52 million, which was $8 million more than the previous year and placed Tennessee State No. 2 among historically black colleges and universities in new research funding.

Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, TSU’s vice president of research and institutional advancement, said she’s excited about the future of TSU.

“I’m looking forward to this year,” she said. “The plan is to keep the momentum, and actually accelerate this year with larger initiatives, that once again still provide greater impact to the research we’re doing.”

Tequila Johnson, chair of the Staff Senate, said she was pleased to hear the positive outcomes and outlooks shared by President Glover, as well as others who presented during the retreat.

“I think it was a great opportunity to be able to fellowship with staff and faculty members,” Johnson said. “It was also a good opportunity to be able to hear some of the ideas that staff have in relationship to customer service and how we can work together to improve satisfaction.”

Assistant College of Business professor Isaac Addae said the Faculty-Staff Institute was “very effective in setting the tone for the upcoming semester.”

“Dr. Glover’s holistic approach to student-centered customer service, and reiterating to faculty that it takes all of us, is a step in the right direction,” he said. “As an alumnus and business faculty member, I was proud to see the upward trend of enrollment in our academic unit. I am inspired to do my part to embrace the Team TSU mindset and provide excellence in teaching, research and service to the institution.”

Dr. De’Etra Young, assistant professor of Urban Forestry in the College of Agriculture, said the information shared during the retreat provided inspiration for the year ahead.

“I thought it was great.  I thought it set the tone to build teamwork and collaboration and putting students first,” she said.  “I really liked the president’s message of ‘Team TSU,’ and using that throughout the year to build the TSU family and putting that at the forefront.”

Kiana Hughes, who earned a master’s degree from TSU in 2017 and now works as Title III program coordinator and completion coach, echoed similar sentiments.

“Being a recent graduate I really enjoyed seeing the actual numbers and the growth of the university. Also, being a recent graduate of a graduate program I am really excited to see the way the graduate school is progressing,” Hughes said.

Hughes, who received her undergraduate degree from TSU in Exercise Science HPSS (Human Performance Science), said she looks forward to a great year at the university.

“One thing I want to see and I am really excited about is faculty and staff coming together to make TSU a better environment over all. I am really excited about that, “Hughes said.

Following the annual faculty and staff institute employees gathered for lunch on the campus lawn where they continued to fellowship and share excitement about the new academic year.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU alums provide feast for football players through family food business

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The owners of a family food business returned to their alma mater to provide a feast for the Tennessee State University football team after their practice on Aug. 9.

(l-r) Cardale Winfrey, Burnice Winfrey, TSU Coach Rod Reed, and Victor Winfrey.

Burnice, Victor and Cardale Winfrey, all TSU graduates, play a part in the operation of Winfrey Foods, along with their sister, Karla, and another brother, Carlton. The family members served the players and coaches in a buffet-style line in the indoor practice facility.

“It was great to be back on campus and give back to the university and athletic department that has given me so much,” said Victor Winfrey, who played football at TSU from ’85-’89.

Before the dinner, Victor was presented a helmet similar to the one he wore when he played.

Victor Winfrey

“I remember when I played how excited and grateful I was for any food or snacks we had after an evening or night practice when the cafeteria was closed. So, it really made me feel good to be able to provide a good meal to the young men, who were so well-mannered and very appreciative.”

Although she graduated from Middle Tennessee State University, Karla Winfrey took some history classes at TSU. She also enjoyed visiting TSU again, and meeting the players, who she described as “amazing gentlemen.”

“Over and over they expressed their gratitude and said they thoroughly enjoyed the special meal we prepared,” she said. “Coach (Rod) Reed is doing an outstanding job training America’s future leaders.”

Coach Reed and his staff were also grateful.

“Thank you Winfrey Foods for providing dinner for the TSU Big Blue Tigers,” Reed said. “Your food was outstanding, and service and fellowship was even better.”

Members of New Season Church provide water and free pizza.

Winfrey Foods was started about two years ago. Its signature item is Royal Relish Chow Chow, which contains mother Judy Winfrey’s secret ingredients, and is available in all Publix supermarkets throughout Tennessee. The relish is also popular among chefs who prepare food in the Tennessee Titans’ luxury suites.

A week after Winfrey Foods’ benevolence, a number of community partners set up tents and tables with free refreshments, food, giveaways and entertainment for new TSU students moving into their residence halls, as well as volunteers and visitors.

Among the groups were 15th Avenue Baptist Church, New Season Church, and Restoration Corner Ministry, which set up water stations and feeding tables in several residence halls.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.