All posts by Lucas Johnson

College of Agriculture hosts Environmental Justice Academy

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s College of Agriculture recently hosted a program to equip students with the tools to address environmental and public health challenges in their communities.

Eleven students from eight 1890 Land Grant Universities participated in the Environmental Justice Academy March 19-21. Academy participants engaged in a series of virtual and interactive classroom sessions that help shape the principles of an effective Environmental Justice leader.

Courses included environmental law and regulations, community capacity building, strategic partnership and development of replication of best practices.

“I’m glad to collaborate with the US Forest Service and Environmental Protection Agency to pilot the 1890 Environmental Justice Academy,” said Dr. De’Etra Young, assistant professor in the College of Ag. “We’re equipping students to be leaders.”

Besides TSU, participating institutions included: Alcorn University, Florida A&M Law, Fort Valley State University, South Carolina State University, Southern University and A&M College, Tuskegee University, and University of Maryland Eastern Shore.

Participant Brittanii Wade will be finishing law school in Florida A&M in a little over a month and plans to pursue environmental justice.

“Environmental justice ensures that every community, especially minority communities, have clean air, clean water, and clean soil,” said Wade. “I need the tools that they’re teaching so I can apply them at the community level, city level, state level, federal level, whichever direction I go in.”

To learn more about TSU’s College of Agriculture, visit  http://www.tnstate.edu/agriculture/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU College of Engineering receives $1M award for scholarships to recruit graduate students

NASHVILLE, Tenn.  (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s College of Engineering is ramping up its recruitment efforts for graduate students and has scholarship dollars to seal the deal. The increase in scholarship offers is courtesy of a $1 million grant from the National Science Foundation to support graduate students.

The award, “Scholarships To Attract and Retain Students (STARS) in Graduate Engineering and Computer Science Programs,” will provide 30 scholarships to students who are pursuing master’s degrees in engineering or computer science over five years.  

Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College of Engineering, said the scholarship program will support the College’s effort to

recruit and grow the graduate programs in engineering and computer science. 

He said the funds should be available by May 1 and that scholarships will likely start being awarded this summer to students in and outside of Tennessee. Applications will be reviewed by the College of Engineering. Hargrove said applicants will be evaluated on their grade point average (at least 3.4), research interest, and their discipline.

“We are strategically focused to increase our enrollment through the graduate program and increase our research activities in advanced materials, cybersecurity, and data sciences and analytics,” said Hargrove.  “We recently reformed our graduate degree programs in engineering, and this funding will allow us to recruit talented students to pursue a master’s in engineering or computer science.”

As part of the college’s strategic plan, the goal is to increase graduate enrollment by at least 25 percent in areas of research. 

In addition to financial support, the program will include cohort-building activities, graduate student support services, seminars, summer internships, and mentorship. 

Dr. Frances Williams, the project’s Principal Investigator (PI) and associate dean, said the “measures are crucial in providing for recruitment, retention, and graduation of graduate students.“

“This is imperative as the United States is faced with a human resource challenge in its need to produce more domestic scientific and engineering talent with advanced competencies,” she said.

In addition to Williams and Hargrove, the project team includes, Dr. Catherine Armwood-Gordon, TSU assistant professor of Civil and Architectural Engineering; and Dr. Ebony O. McGee of Vanderbilt University. 

“I would like to personally thank the strong support of Vice President Lesia Crumpton-Young, Director Phyllis Danner, and the entire (TSU) office team of the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs,” said Hargrove.

To learn more about TSU’s College of Engineering, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/engineering/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Mass communication students visit home of music icon Lionel Richie during L.A. visit

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University mass communication students got a special treat in Los Angeles recently when they visited the home of music legend Lionel Richie.

The students were in L.A. as part of their Extreme Spring Break trip. Joining the students was Joe Richie, who serves as Director of the Center for Media Arts and Production, which is housed within the Department of Communications. Joe Richie and Lionel Richie are first cousins.

Joe Richie (right) and cousin Lionel. (Submitted photo)

Lionel Richie talked to the students about the media business and how to make the most of their talents and gifts, according to Dr. Tameka Winston, department chair and associate professor.

“Our students had an amazing time during their immersive learning experience,” she said.

As part of Extreme Spring Break, students earn course credit for the week-long experience that provides them with actual hands on learning in the fields of journalism, film and Television, and Marketing/PR.

The students also get one-on-one time with industry professionals, diversity officers, internship coordinators, and hiring managers.

Winston said she hopes the students will have the same success as those who have graduated from the department.

Spencer Glover, a 2012 TSU graduate, took home the Emmy editing/program during the 33rd Annual Midsouth Regional Emmy Awards on Feb. 16. He was awarded for his work on “The Passion for Music,” a production for Yamaha Entertainment Group.

“We are so excited when our students and faculty are awarded for their hard work and excelling in their profession,” said Winston.

Also at the awards ceremony, Airielle Vincent, an assistant professor of mass communications, won her second Emmy as weekend newscast producer with Fox 17. She was recognized for a story on a church shooting.

To learn more about the Department of Communications, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/Communications/.

TSU partners with company for potentially groundbreaking hemp research

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is partnering with an emerging cannabis company for what officials say could be groundbreaking hemp research.

Dr. Ying Wu, associate professor of Food and Animal Science in TSU’s College of Agriculture, says she’s excited to begin her research with Eufloria Medical of Tennessee, Inc., a subsidiary of  Acacia Diversified Holdings, that will be manufacturing material for the university study.

Dr. Ying Wu

“We have started working on investigation of phytochemical profiles in hemp seeds, oils and extracts, and their related health benefits,” says Wu. “We are aiming to develop some health promoting product using the cutting-edge technologies, and provide reliable data of nutrients and phytochemicals in different hemp varieties.”

The research partnership aims to create a safe and chemical-free vehicle to obtain the health benefits of the whole-hemp plant into virtually anything from food and beverages to topical creams. The TSU research could produce innovative ways to obtain whole plant extract. 

“We wanted to work on something meaningful, we are doing this because we want people to feel better and contribute significantly to making the cannabis industry more sustainable,” says Kim Edwards. VP & COO of Acacia Diversified Holdings. 

Tennessee State University is among the nation’s leaders in hemp research. TSU’s College of Agriculture has charged a team of scientists to develop hemp production practices for Tennessee. The research projects include developing hemp nutritional products for human consumption and studying the economic viability of hemp production in Tennessee. Currently, the university is growing and evaluating 10 varieties of hemp.

“TSU wants to be at the forefront of this new interest that’s cropping up across the country,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture. “If it’s ever approved for large scale use, we have some knowledge about it and can work with the farmers.”

TSU has hosted several hemp workshops/meetings, including one in January with the Tennessee Hemp Industries Association, an advocate for the production of industrial hemp. More than 200 people attended the meeting.

For more information about the College of Agriculture, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/agriculture/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Activist, philanthropist David Banner urges students ‘to give back’

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service)Activist and philanthropist David Banner spoke to students at Tennessee State University Thursday night and urged them to give back to their school and community.

TSU President Glenda Glover talks with David Banner before Thursday night event. (Photo by Charles Cook, TSU Media Relations)

Banner, who is also a rapper, Grammy Award-winning producer and business owner, met with TSU President Glenda Glover before speaking to students in Poag Auditorium as part of a lecture series for Black History Month.

Whether they’re in-state or out-of-state, Banner told the students that they have a responsibility to the university and the community, to help pave the way for others.

“What are you doing for your community?” he asked. “Always try to find a way to give something back.”

A veteran rapper with nearly two decades of experience, Banner has made a name for himself as a successful hip-hop producer. Aside from his own work, he’s put his stamp on songs for T.I., Jill Scott, Chris Brown, Maroon 5, Lil Wayne, Ne-Yo and more. His latest album, “The God Box,” was released in 2017.

Banner has also starred in several movies, including “This Christmas,” “The Butler,” and “Ride Along.”

But these days, the Southern University graduate spends much of his time running his business, a full service music and production agency, and lecturing to students at high schools and colleges across the country.

TSU student Jeremy Miller was at the event Thursday and said Banner inspired him “to give back.”

“I’m the first male in my family to go to college,” said Miller of Columbia, Tennessee. “So, if someone wants to go that route, I want to help them; I want to help them be successful. By helping just one person, that helps the community as a whole.”

To see more events at TSU during Black History Month, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/pr/documents/bhm2019v2.pdf.


Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Aristocrat of Bands rocks ‘Amazon Live’ event at the Ryman

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Members of Tennessee State University’s Aristocrat of Bands rocked the Ryman for the “Amazon Live” event on Feb. 7.

About 400 TSU students, along with individuals from other local colleges and universities, attended the event at the Ryman Auditorium Thursday night to learn more about Amazon and job opportunities it has to offer.

Some attendees used their iPhones to take photos or record the band, while others got out of their seats and moved to the beat of the band.

Larry Jenkins, assistant director of bands at TSU, said it’s always a joy to perform and see the audience’s response.

“It means a lot for the university, for the students,” said Jenkins. “To be called to do an event like this means a lot.”

Amazon announced in November that Nashville will be home to its Operations Center of Excellence, as well as the company’s headquarters for its logistics group. It’s expected to bring an estimated 5,000 jobs to the area.

Aristocrat of Bands performing at “Amazon Live” at the Ryman Auditorium. (Photo by Lucas Johnson, TSU Media Relations)

Frank Stevenson, TSU’s dean of students, lauded Amazon for creating a space to introduce their company and brand to college students, in particular.

“We’re really excited for them to have the opportunity to meet with some of the executives at Amazon, and to learn about the Amazon culture and brand,” Stevenson said before the event.

Braxton Simpson is the student representative on TSU’s Board of Trustees and the Amazon Prime student ambassador. She said she’s looking forward to the opportunities Amazon is offering.

“With Amazon coming to Nashville, bringing 5,000 jobs, that opens up a lot of opportunity for students, especially in this area,” said Simpson. “We want to prepare TSU students for that opportunity that’s coming our way.”

To learn more about the Aristocrat of Bands, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/aristocratofbands/

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU College of Business Continues Tradition of Global Excellence with AACSB Accreditation Extension

Courtesy: College of Business

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s College of Business has once again been acknowledged for its first class business school by receiving an extension on accreditation by AACSB-International, the premiere accrediting body for business schools around the globe.

“AACSB accreditation is the hallmark of excellence in business education and has been earned by less than five percent of the world’s business schools,” said Dr. Millicent Gray Lownes-Jackson, dean of the College of Business.

“To have this level of accreditation shows that the TSU College of Business has a creditable, reputable, and sustainable business school. The College of Business takes great pride in receiving this honor which involved a rigorous peer-reviewed evaluation to determine whether the College meets AACSB International standards of excellence for a quality business school.”

The College of Business has about 1,000 students and offers the Bachelor of Business Administration degree to undergraduates in accounting, business administration, business information systems, and economics and finance. At the graduate level, the College offers the Master of Business Administration (MBA) with a traditional evening, a one-year accelerated, and a one-year executive format.

“AACSB congratulates each institution on their achievement,” said Stephanie M. Bryant, executive vice president and chief accreditation officer of AACSB. “Every AACSB-accredited school has demonstrated a focus on excellence in all areas, including teaching, research, curricula development, and student learning. The intense peer-review process exemplifies their commitment to quality business education.”

To learn more about TSU’s College of Business, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/business/.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

‘TSU Day at the Capitol’ a chance for lawmakers to experience university’s excellence

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Hemp research. Robotics. Innovative programs. They’re just some of the excellence Tennessee lawmakers will experience at “TSU Day at the Capitol” on Tuesday, Feb. 12.

Hemp workshop at TSU in March. (TSU College of Agriculture)

Tennessee State University administrators, faculty, students and alumni will be showcasing the university’s research and other innovative initiatives at the annual event.

TSU President Glenda Glover will kick it off with a ceremony at 10 a.m. in Senate Hearing Room II in the Cordell Hull Building. TSU visitors will have a chance to meet with lawmakers, who will see displays from some of the school’s various colleges and departments on the 8th floor of the building.

Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of TSU’s College of Engineering, said TSU Day at the Capitol is “always an exciting day for TSU.”

“It allows us to display Tennessee’s investment in higher education, and the great things that are happening here at TSU.”

Products made from hemp. (College of Agriculture)

One highlight at this year’s event will be TSU’s nationally recognized hemp research. The university’s College of Agriculture has hosted several workshops on industrial hemp, cannabis plants with little of the chemical that can cause a high.

The College of Agriculture has charged a team of scientists to develop hemp production practices for Tennessee. The research projects include developing hemp nutritional products for human consumption and studying the economic viability of hemp production in Tennessee. Currently, the university is growing and evaluating 10 varieties of hemp.

“TSU wants to be at the forefront of this new interest that’s cropping up across the country,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture. “If it’s ever approved for large scale use, we have some knowledge about it and can work with the farmers.”

Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of TSU’s College of Engineering, talks about life-size robotic tiger designed and built by TSU students at a previous TSU Day at the Capitol. Photo by Lucas Johnson (TSU Media Relations)

In November, several legislators toured TSU’s campus. The lawmakers received briefings and slide presentations from administrators on the university’s 2019 Legislative Priorities for funding consideration by the General Assembly. The priorities included the creation of a STEM Institute.

“With the heightened demand for diversification in the STEM work force, an institute would provide research, professional development and training in recruiting and retaining minorities in STEM programs in Tennessee and nationally,” said Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, vice president for Research and Institutional Advancement.

Rep. Harold Love, Jr., whose district includes TSU, said he hopes young people attending this year’s TSU Day at the Capitol will become more interested in the legislative process, and even try to have a voice in policymaking.

“When we talk about active citizen engagement and forming policy, this is a prime example of what we would like to see from all of our students at colleges and universities across the state,” said Love, a TSU alum. “This is what citizens are supposed to do, come down and be actively involved in policy formulation when laws are being passed or proposals considered.”

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Professor Yvonne Young “Y.Y.” Clark, “TSU Lady Engineer,” remembered

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is mourning the passing of Professor Yvonne Young “Y.Y.” Clark, the first female faculty member in the College of Engineering.

Dr. Yvonne Young “Y.Y.” Clark

Clark died Sunday, Jan. 27, at the age of 89. A mechanical engineer, she broke many barriers and shattered stereotypes to become one of the most-admired educators in the field.

“Mrs. Clark’s influence and nurturing as a mechanical engineering student is one of the reasons I decided to pursue an academic career, for which I am forever grateful,” said Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College of Engineering and a former student of Clark’s.

In 1956, Clark became the first female engineer hired as an instructor at the then-Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State University, earning the title of “TSU Lady Engineer.” She rose through the ranks, becoming an associate professor, and twice heading the Department of Mechanical Engineering for a total of 11 years.

At TSU, Clark did not only distinguish herself as an outstanding teacher in a male-dominated workplace, she became a champion for students by ensuring that they received the appropriate help they needed to better understand the material. She frowned on professors who were quick to tell students they were wrong without explaining the error and how to correct it.

“I enjoyed helping students,” said Clark in a 2016 interview when she was a Homecoming honoree. “Most teachers don’t understand, in my opinion, what to do for a student to learn. You can’t ‘brow beat’ them, but you can help them by making sure they understand the subject you are trying to teach.”

Clark retired from TSU in 2011 after 55 years of service. But she left a legacy that continues on through the many students she influenced.

“Y.Y. Clark was a trailblazer, amazing professor and mentor that inspired us to pursue our dreams and be the best engineers we can be,” said Darnell Cowan, one of Clark’s students who currently works at NASA.

Marquan Martin, director of the Identification and Access Control Center in TSU’s Office of Emergency Management, said that as a freshman at TSU “one of my greatest joys was taking graphics design under the tutelage of Professor Y.Y. Clark.”

“She challenged you, encouraged you, and she genuinely cared about every single student,” he said. “She was an amazing professor and mentor, a true gem to the Tennessee State University community. She will be remembered by all the lives she touched.”

To learn more about TSU’s College of Engineering, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/engineering/

Note: Emmanuel Freeman in the Office of Media Relations contributed to this article.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Southern states may lag behind on marijuana laws, but Tennessee State University is leading the way in hemp research

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is among the nation’s leaders in hemp research, and the recently passed U.S. Farm Bill is making sure it remains at the forefront.

Hemp workshop at TSU in March. (Photo by Joan Kite, College of Agriculture)

The bill Congress approved in December legalizes the growth and manufacturing of industrial hemp, cannabis plants with little of the chemical that can cause a high. The legalization clears the way for existing programs at land-grant institutions like TSU to expand research and development programs for medicinal and textile production.

“I am excited for this opportunity for TSU, and I look forward to seeing how this will help produce the next generation of agricultural leaders in our state,” said Tennessee Congressman Jim Cooper.

Historically, industrial hemp has been regarded primarily as an agricultural crop valued for fiber and grain. Hemp fiber is used to make textiles, building materials, animal bedding, mulch, paper, industrial products, and biofuels. Hemp grain, or seed, is used in food and feed products, and oil from the seed is used to make personal care products and industrial products, including paints, solvents, and lubricants.

TSU’s College of Agriculture has charged a team of scientists to develop hemp production practices for Tennessee. The research projects include developing hemp nutritional products for human consumption and studying the economic viability of hemp production in Tennessee. Currently, the university is growing and evaluating 10 varieties of hemp.

Products made from hemp. (Photo by Joan Kite, College of Agriculture)

“TSU wants to be at the forefront of this new interest that’s cropping up across the country,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture. “If it’s ever approved for large scale use, we have some knowledge about it and can work with the farmers.”

TSU has hosted several hemp workshops/meetings, including one on Jan. 11 with the Tennessee Hemp Industries Association, an advocate for the production of industrial hemp. More than 200 people attended the meeting.

Joe Kirkpatrick, president of the TNHIA, said Tennessee currently has the largest state HIA chapter in the nation and he credited “TSU for helping us facilitate those meetings and outreach to the public.”

“It’s also great to have the world-class laboratories and scientists there, the researchers, to help … move the hemp industry forward,” Kirkpatrick said.

Dr. Fitzroy Bullock heads up the hemp research at TSU. He said people have come from as far as Colorado to attend the university’s hemp workshops.

“We have been very successful,” Bullock said. “We have established something that folks need.”

Tonya Lewis, a Nashville resident interested in growing hemp, said the meeting she attended at TSU was beneficial.

“It helped me understand where the state is in regards to research on hemp, and how to go about getting everything from a license to actually grow hemp, to looking at the benefits of it statewide, as far as economically,” Lewis said.

Farmer Michael Walls talks to local television reporter at TSU hemp workshop in September. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Anand Kumar is a research assistant in TSU’s College of Ag. He said the College has extension programs that allow researchers to visit individuals who are growing hemp and assist them as needed.

“We designed our program so we can be responsive to the demands of farmers in Tennessee,” Kumar said. “We try to reach all counties throughout the state.”

Michael Walls is one farmer who has benefited from TSU hemp researchers. His family has a 140-acre farm in Hardeman County that is using an acre to grow hemp.

“There’s a lot of potential for what hemp can do,” said Walls, adding that his family plans to broaden their hemp growth. “I’m just trying to get more information to see what other possibilities there are.”

In addition to hemp legalization, the Farm Bill also provides TSU and the other 18 historically-black land-grant institutions the following funding over the next five years:

  • $95 million for student scholarships and grants
  • $50 million to support three HBCU Centers of Excellence in agricultural workforce development, nutrition and food security, economic development and emerging technologies
  • $15 million for HBCU cooperative extension and research

To learn more about TSU’s College of Agriculture, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/agriculture/.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.