All posts by Lucas Johnson

TSU prepared to provide strong candidates for new Amazon operations center

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover says the university is poised to provide strong candidates for Amazon’s new executive operations center.

Dr. Glenda Glover

Amazon announced Tuesday that Nashville will be home to its Operations Center of Excellence, as well as the company’s headquarters for its logistics group. It’s expected to bring an estimated 5,000 jobs to the area.

“Excellence is Our Habit is TSU’s motto for a reason,” says Glover. “The university is prepared to provide a diverse group of very talented and workforce-ready students. In addition to TSU establishing a student employment pipeline of business and tech-savvy employees for Amazon, we have an array of accredited and professional development programs to help their current workers enhance their skills and career path within the company.”

Dr. Achintya Ray, an economics professor at TSU, agrees.

“As the only public university in Nashville, Tennessee State University stands uniquely poised to support these corporate giants, their employees, family members of the employees, and the businesses that support them with highly-skilled human capital, workforce training opportunities, research partnerships and more,” says Ray.

TSU’s executive MBA and continuing education offerings are just a few of the tools the university can readily offer Amazon through the corporate employee education program, adds Glover.

According to Amazon, Nashville will serve as the company’s Retail Operations division. The one million square foot office space will house the tech and management functions of the division, including customer fulfillment, customer service, transportation, and supply chain, amongst others.

Currently, Amazon employs about 2,500 people in the Nashville region across five fulfillment and sortation centers.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Ag researchers work to make sure turkeys safe to eat

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – As people across the country prepare for Thanksgiving, researchers at Tennessee State University are making sure the turkeys consumers eat are safe.

Dr. Sam Nahashon

The researchers in the university’s College of Agriculture are using probiotics (cultivated beneficial microorganisms) to fight pathogens, including salmonella, which is involved in a current outbreak in turkeys.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the outbreak started in November 2017. As of Nov. 5, this year, 164 people have been infected. The agency reminds people to properly cook and handle turkeys this holiday season.

Dr. Sam Nahashon is professor of poultry science at TSU, and chair of the Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. He said the current Ag research would reduce or exclude pathogens in the intestinal tract of turkeys or chickens by feeding them the cultivated beneficial microorganisms through feed and/or water.

Dr. Fur-Chi Chen

“It just takes a few harmful microorganisms in our body to cause a disease,” said Nahashon. “Our goal is to reduce salmonella and campylobacter in poultry.”

Added research professor Dr. Fur-Chi Chen: “The whole idea is using the beneficial bacteria to feed into the poultry, and during the production, they can prevent the salmonella.”

The CDC recommends handling raw turkey carefully, including washing hands before and after preparing or eating turkey. Cooking raw turkey thoroughly (to an internal temperature of 165°F, measured by placing a thermometer in the thickest part of the bird) will help prevent food poisoning.

TSU Ag professor Elyse Shearer said frozen turkeys should also be fully defrosted, preferably in the refrigerator over several days, and they should not be washed to prevent the spread of bacteria.

Dr. Elyse Shearer

“Also, make sure that no utensils or supplies that came in contact with the raw turkey touch other food items to prevent cross-contamination of harmful pathogens,” said Dr. Shearer, who works in the College of Ag’s Department of Family and Consumer Sciences.

TSU’s College of Agriculture has received millions of dollars from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to research poultry and promote food safety.

To learn more about the College of Agriculture’s food safety research, visit

http://www.fightbac.org/food-safety-education/dont-wing-it/.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Choir part of uplifting performance with Carrie Underwood at CMA Awards

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Members of the Tennessee State University Choir joined a Nashville ensemble in an uplifting performance with megastar Carrie Underwood at the 52nd Country Music Association Awards Wednesday night.

Submitted photo.

The choir members and Portara Ensemble sang with Underwood on her timely hit song, “Love Wins,” during the show at Bridgestone Arena.

“It is an absolute honor to sing with an artist the caliber of Carrie Underwood on national television and it was really meaningful for us to sing a song with a text that encourages unity, in this time of incredible division and strife,” said Dr. Susan Kelly, TSU’s choral director.

It was the TSU Choir’s second performance at the CMAs. The group performed on the awards show last year, and students said before last night’s performance that they were excited the university was getting another opportunity.

“I’m really excited,” said choir member Destiny Pennington, a freshman from Detroit. “It’s something that I’ve never done before and have always wanted to do.”

Junior DeMicheal Martin agreed.

“It’s exciting, and it’s also an opportunity to showcase our great university,” said Martin, of Memphis.

Kelly said the opportunity to sing at the CMAs again is a testimony to the hard work of the students and the success they’re having.

“The choir program has grown so much over the past three years and I am delighted that they are beginning to get opportunities and recognition in the Nashville community,” she said.

Dr. Robert Elliott, chair of TSU’s Department of Music, shared similar sentiment.

“The CMAs are a hallmark of excellence in Nashville; so is TSU,” he said. “Dr. Kelly and her students once more do all of us at TSU proud.”

The choir’s performance will be TSU’s second encounter with country music stardom this year. In August, the university’s famed Aristocrat of Bands performed with superstar Keith Urban at Bridgestone Arena during his tour stop in Nashville. The band was featured as a part of Urban’s closing hit song, “Wasted Time.”

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Choir to grace the CMA Awards once again

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Members of the Tennessee State University Choir will once again be performing at the Country Music Association Awards Wednesday night.

The choir performed at the 51st CMA Awards last year, and students and faculty say they are looking forward to doing it again at the show scheduled for 7 p.m. at Nashville’s Bridgestone Arena.

“I’m really excited,” said choir member Destiny Pennington, a freshman from Detroit. “It’s something that I’ve never done before and have always wanted to do.”

Junior DeMicheal Martin agreed.

“It’s exciting, and it’s also an opportunity to showcase our great university,” said Martin, of Memphis.

Last year, the choral students appeared as backup singers to some of the biggest names in country music, including Carrie Underwood, Darius Rucker, Keith Urban, Garth Brooks and Reba McEntire. The students were invited along with the Portara Ensemble, to kick off the awards show, which was broadcast live on national television from the Music City Center.

Dr. Susan Kelly, the choir’s director, said the opportunity to sing at the CMAs again is a testimony to the hard work of the students and the success they’re having.

“The choir program has grown so much over the past three years and I am delighted that they are beginning to get opportunities and recognition in the Nashville community,” Kelly said.

Dr. Robert Elliott, chair of TSU’s Department of Music, shared similar sentiment.

“The CMAs are a hallmark of excellence in Nashville; so is TSU,” he said. “Dr. Kelly and her students once more do all of us at TSU proud.”

The choir’s performance will be TSU’s second encounter with country music stardom this year. In August, the university’s famed Aristocrat of Bands performed with megastar Keith Urban at Bridgestone Arena during his tour stop in Nashville. The band was featured as a part of Urban’s closing hit song, “Wasted Time.”

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU honors its Veterans and Tuskegee Airmen alumni

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University recognized members of the U.S. Armed Forces, as well as two Tuskegee Airmen alumni, at a special Veterans Day program on Monday.

TSU President Glenda Glover speaks at Veterans Day program. (Photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

Mr. Wade Thomas graduated from then-Tennessee Agricultural & Industrial State College in 1949 and Lt. Joseph White graduated from the institution in 1954. Both men were members of the famed Tuskegee Airmen, the first African-American military aviators in the United States Armed Forces during World War II.

Before the men were posthumously honored, TSU President Glenda Glover greeted those in attendance, and recognized all veterans.

“On this Veterans Day, we recognize the men and women of our Armed Forces for the courage and dedication it takes to maintain our freedom and democracy,” she said. “They are the true heroes, including those who are here with us today.”

In the early forties, Thomas enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps and served with the Tuskegee Airmen during WWII. He later attended Tennessee A&I and graduated with a bachelor’s in business administration, with distinction. He went on to become one of the first minority accountants in the state of Tennessee, and later became a certified public accountant.

White joined the Tuskegee cadet program in 1943, becoming one of the famed “Red Tail” fighter pilots. During his service, he flew missions in North Africa, Italy, France and Germany. He later enrolled at Tennessee A&I. He graduated with a bachelor’s in physics, and went on to receive two master’s degrees in science education and administration, as well as a doctorate in physics. He later served as a physicist and teacher, establishing an electronics program at Pearl High School in Nashville.

Dr. Katie Kinnard White stands next to portrait of her late husband, Lt. Joseph White, and the artist, TSU graduate Brandon Van Leer. (Submitted photo)

White’s widow, Dr. Katie Kinnard White, attended Monday’s program with White’s nephew, Thomas Kinnard. She said after the event that her late husband would have been 97 this year.

“I am very pleased that he is being honored,” said Dr. White, who met her husband at Tennessee State, where she taught for 35 years. “I always appreciated the fact that he was a Tuskegee Airman. He was very proud of that fact.”

Three members of Wade’s family attended the program.

“This is a very exciting moment,” said son George Thomas, who attended with brothers, Axel and Karl, and sister, Korda. “He accomplished things that opened the door for a lot of blacks. It’s great to be able to celebrate him.”

Dr. Ivan Mosley, chair of the Department of Aeronautical and Industrial Technology in TSU’s College of Engineering, was the program’s keynote speaker. He said Tuskegee Airmen, like Thomas and White, were able to become successful because someone took a “keen interest” in their abilities.

“When we take a keen interest in someone, it makes a difference,” Mosley said.

Program keynote speaker Dr. Ivan Mosley, chair of TSU’s Department of Aeronautical and Industrial Technology. (Photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

TSU senior Elijah McNutt performed a dramatic reading during the program. He said he enjoyed honoring the two Tuskegee Airmen, and all veterans.

“It’s really a great opportunity to show appreciation, to let them know we haven’t forgotten them,” McNutt said.

In August, TSU, a certified “Vets Campus,” announced it is implementing a new program that will allow veterans to count military training for credit hours when they enroll at the institution. The program is part of the State of Tennessee’s Veteran Reconnect Initiative.

As part of its Veterans Day activities, TSU hosted a performance by the world-renowned USAF Band of Mid-America’s Shades of Blue Jazz Ensemble in Kean Hall Monday evening. The concert was free and open to the public.

Fore more information about veteran services call 615-963-7001, or visit http://www.tnstate.edu/records/veteran/.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Agriculture and Home Economic Hall of Fame welcomes new inductees

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The dean of Tennessee State University’s College of Agriculture was among the three individuals inducted into the Ag and Home Economics Hall of Fame Thursday night.

Dr. Chandra Reddy was inducted along with Mr. Will Nesby, retired USDA program manager; and Mr. J.W. McGuire, retired county director, cooperative extension service. A ceremony was held at the Sheraton Music City Hotel.

The TSU Agriculture and Home Economics Hall of Fame was established in 1996 to recognize and honor those persons who have been diligent in their zeal to enhance the quality of life for residents of Tennessee and abroad, and to assist students in attending TSU and majoring in areas of Agriculture and Human Sciences.

TSU President Glenda Glover congratulated the new inductees, and thanked alumni and others in attendance for all their support.

“It’s good to see each of you here tonight, as we pay tribute to those who have made TSU outstanding.,” Glover said. “To our alumni, faculty, staff, students, thank you for being an ambassador of good will for our institution.”

TSU’s Homecoming activities continued Friday with the Charles Campbell Fish Fry, Student Pep Rally, and Greek Step Show.

On Friday evening, TSU planned a stellar Scholarship Gala at the Music City Center. This year, the Gala welcomes back comedian Jonathan Slocumb as the master of ceremony. Special entertainment will be provided by legendary jazz artist Roy Ayers. Proceeds from ticket sales and sponsorships are used to provide financial assistance to students.

Homecoming will conclude Oct. 20 with the Homecoming Parade from 14th and Jefferson Street to 33rd and John Merritt Boulevard, and the big football matchup between the Tigers and the Golden Eagles of Tennessee Tech at Nissan Stadium.

For more information about Homecoming activities, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/alumni/homecoming/

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Groundbreakings for construction projects highlight TSU Homecoming, provide boost for recruitment

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University has unveiled major construction projects that will change the institution’s footprint forever.

The new construction includes two new residence halls at an estimated cost of $75.3 million and a $38.8 million Health Sciences Building.

Tennessee State broke ground for all three as a part of Homecoming activities last week. TSU President Glenda Glover believes the new residence halls and academic building will play a major role in recruitment efforts.

“The university is undergoing a renaissance of sorts; it began with our new, higher admission standards, and continues with the new construction of the residence halls and Health Sciences Building for prospective students to enjoy and reap the benefits,” said President Glover.

“We are proud of our legacy and the current buildings on campus are a part of that legacy, but the construction projects are the first on our campus in 23 years. These are exciting times for the university and our partners.”

TSU broke ground on Oct. 18 for the state-of-the-art Health Sciences Building and an Alumni Welcome Center.

Rendering of new Health Sciences Building.

The day before, there was a groundbreaking for the two new residence halls, the first ones to be built on the campus in 23 years. The new Health Sciences Building will be the first state-funded building built on the campus in 15 years.

Later that Thursday was the groundbreaking for the Alumni Welcome Center, which is the first privately funded building gifted to the University, as well as the first building to be funded by alumni. Earlier this year, alums Amos and Brenda Otis made a commitment to build the center.

“It is a privilege and a pleasure to be able to do something for the university that pulled me out of the streets of Detroit and gave me an education and an opportunity to be a productive citizen,” said Amos Otis.

Faculty and staff, as well as state and local officials, have turned out for the groundbreakings. Thursday’s event for the Health Sciences Building drew media from just about all the local outlets.

All the construction projects are expected to be completed by 2020.

“Today is a wonderful day,“ Glover said at the Health Sciences’ event. “We break this ground for student success. We break this ground in support of our mission to educate students at the highest level who attend Tennessee State University.”

Currently, TSU’s College of Health Sciences has eight departments and more than 12 programs spread across five buildings on campus.

“With this new building, a number of these programs will come together at this location, to continue the excellent work they’re currently doing in teaching, research and service,” said Dr. Ronald Barredo, interim dean for the College of Health Sciences.

Groundbreaking for new residence halls on Wednesday. (Photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

State Rep. Brenda Gilmore, a TSU alumna, shared similar sentiment about the $38.8 million facility.

“This future building will one day host some of the best and brightest minds in the world,” Gilmore said. “In so many ways, this event does not only mark a new adventure, but reaffirms the longstanding commitment that Tennessee State has to excellence and innovation in higher education.”

TSU sophomore Jailen Leavell said the new Health Sciences Building is great news, as well as the other planned construction on the campus.

“For the students, this is big,” Leavell said. “We’re developing tomorrow’s leaders.”

At the groundbreaking for the new dorms, State Rep. Harold Love, Jr., lauded Dr. Glover and “all those involved in the intricacies of getting this done.”

“Residence halls represent a university’s commitment to student success just as much as other educational buildings,” said Love, also a TSU alum. “Tennessee State continues to invest in facilities to increase the opportunities for students to find a home away from home.”

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU football player Christion Abercrombie transferred to rehab center, continuing to improve

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University football player Christion Abercrombie has been transferred to a rehabilitation center in Atlanta.

According to a release from the Shepherd Center, the 20-year-old student-athlete was moved from Vanderbilt University Medical Center on Oct. 17. Before the move, he was upgraded from critical to stable condition.

Christion sustained a brain injury during Tennessee State’s football game with Vanderbilt University on Sept. 29.

He was admitted to Shepherd Center’s Intensive Care Unit for evaluation, care and observation.

“Soon, he will move into the hospital’s Brain Injury Rehabilitation Program, where he will begin therapy under the guidance of a full team of medical and rehabilitation specialists,” according to the Center.

The facility specializes in medical treatment, research and rehabilitation for people with spinal cord injury or brain injury. Founded in 1975, Shepherd Center is a private, not-for-profit hospital and is ranked by U.S. News & World Report among the top 10 rehabilitation hospitals in the nation.

Staci Abercrombie, Christion’s mother, said at a press conference on Oct. 3 that she was optimistic about her son’s recovery because of her faith, and she reiterated that sentiment in a recent statement.

“We truly appreciate all of the love, support and prayers from everyone,” she said. “This has given the family the strength needed to be able to care for Christion. This injury was not expected, but God has prepared us and will continue to provide us with his healing power. We know that it’s a miracle that our son is here today. Please continue to pray for Christion’s full recovery.”

TSU President Glenda Glover said Christion’s improving health is “an example of what the power of prayer can do.”

“The TSU Family is extremely happy to hear that football player Christion Abercrombie is continuing to improve,” Glover said. “The news couldn’t have come at a better time than during our homecoming week. The entire TSU Family has had Christion on our minds throughout the entire planning process of the last few weeks. Again, this is great news. We ask that everyone keep praying for Christion, and his family, as he moves to the next phase of care and ultimately makes a full recovery.”

Prayer for Christion has been ongoing. Shortly after the incident, the TSU family held a prayer vigil for him, and the university’s National Alumni Association called for a special day of prayer

A GoFundMe has been set up to help Christion and his family. To donate, visit www.gofundme.com/tennessee-state-univ-athletics-dept.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU breaks ground for first new residence halls in 23 years

TSU breaks ground for first new residence halls in 23 years

 NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – TSU President Glenda Glover helped break ground Wednesday for two new co-educational residence halls, the first of three groundbreakings taking place during Homecoming week.

TSU President Glenda Glover unveils information about new residence halls. (Photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

Wednesday’s groundbreaking, the first for a new residence hall at TSU since 1995, took place on the lawn of the Strange Performing Arts Building. The groundbreaking for a Health Sciences Building is scheduled for 10 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 18, in the Hankal Hall Courtyard. And the groundbreaking for an Alumni Welcome Center will take place around 1:30 p.m. at the corner of 31st and John Merritt Blvd.

Construction of the residence halls was initially announced last fall after the State Building Commission approved construction of the $75.3 million project.

“We break ground this morning for student residence life,” said Glover at a ceremony before the groundbreaking. “We break this ground for student success. And we break this ground because it is altogether fitting and proper for upgrading student life on the campus of Tennessee State University.”

Dr. Tracy Ford, vice president of student affairs at TSU, said the groundbreaking for the residence halls and the other planned construction is indeed “reason to celebrate.”

“Today doesn’t just mark the groundbreaking of a physical structure, but it shines a light on the amazing future of TSU, and represents one of the many exciting and strategic changes to come,” Ford said.

Student trustee Braxton Simpson speaks at ceremony before groundbreaking. (Photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

Braxton Simpson, student representative on the TSU Board of Trustees, expressed similar sentiment.

“This is a very exciting moment for all of the students here at Tennessee State University,” she said.

Besides TSU’s faculty and staff, Wednesday’s groundbreaking was also attended by local and state officials.

“This is a wonderful day,” said State Sen. Thelma Harper. “TSU is No. 1!”

State Rep. Harold Love, Jr., a TSU graduate, lauded Dr. Glover and “all those involved in the intricacies of getting this done.”

“Residence halls represent a university’s commitment to student success just as much as other educational buildings,” Love said. “Tennessee State continues to invest in facilities to increase the opportunities for students to find a home away from home.”

For more information about the other groundbreakings and Homecoming activities, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/alumni/homecoming/

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU football player continuing to recover, headed to rehab

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University football student-athlete Christion Abercrombie is scheduled to be discharged from Vanderbilt University Medical Center on Wednesday and transported to a rehabilitation center in Atlanta, according to TSU Athletic officials.

The Athletics Department said Tuesday that Abercrombie, who sustained a head injury in the TSU-Vanderbilt football game on Sept. 29, will be taken to the Shepherd Center, which is one of the nation’s top 10 rehabilitation hospitals for brain injuries.

Staci Abercrombie, Christion’s mother, said at a press conference on Oct. 3 that she was optimistic about her son’s recovery because of her faith, and she’s asking for continued prayer.

“We thank everyone for their love, support and prayers,” she said in a statement. “Keep praying.”

TSU President Glenda Glover said Christion’s improving health is “an example of what the power of prayer can do.”

“The TSU Family is extremely happy to hear that football player Christion Abercrombie is continuing to improve,” she said. “The news couldn’t have come at a better time than during our homecoming week. The entire TSU Family has had Christion on our minds throughout the entire planning process of the last few weeks. Again, this is great news. We ask that everyone keep praying for Christion, and his family, as he moves to the next phase of care and ultimately makes a full recovery.”

TSU head football coach Rod Reed expressed similar sentiment.

“This is, in my opinion, a miracle that he’s being discharged after such a traumatic experience,” he said. “We’re looking forward to a speedy recovery.”

Prayer for Christion has been ongoing. Shortly after the injury, the TSU family held a prayer vigil for him, and the university’s National Alumni Association called for a special day of prayer

A GoFundMe has been set up to help Christion and his family. To donate, visit www.gofundme.com/tennessee-state-univ-athletics-dept.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.