All posts by Emmanuel Freeman

TSU Students Compete in Tennessee Academy of Science Conference

NASHVILLE (TSU News Service) – More than 15 students and faculty members from the College of Engineering at Tennessee State University participated in the Centennial meeting of the Tennessee Academy of Science November 16 at Vanderbilt University and presented their on-going research in engineering and environmental science.

The College of Engineering had 10 students compete in the Engineering & Technology Section, and received three awards for first and second place finishes by competing with public and private universities in the state.

Students receiving awards included:

  • 1st Place: Heather Housel, civil and architectural engineering major; Review of Incident Transportation Emergency Evacuation Systems for Populated Areas
  • 2nd Place: Cornel Zlibut, electrical engineering major; Real Time Wireless Video Transmission Using Software Defined Radio
  • 2nd Place: Hung Wai Ho, civil and architectural engineering major; Sorption isotherm of copper and quaternary ammonia compounds to zeolite-perlite-granular activated carbon in a storm water filter

“Our engineering students continue to demonstrate a high level of technical competence, knowledge and leadership ability with their interaction with faculty, and academic performance to prepare them for the careers of the 21st century,” said Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, Dean of the College of Engineering. “They develop outstanding research skills that transfer to the ability to think critically…which is an asset for any college graduate in any occupation.”

The Tennessee Academy of Science serves as collegial organization to promote scientific research within the state among colleges and universities. It involves faculty across the state, and also encourages the active engagement of student research and other professional development opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

The College of Engineering became active with this organization two years ago, and has since received numerous accolades based on student research presentations and posters.

Faculty researchers including Drs. Sachin Shetty, Thomas Byl, Liang Hong, Roger Painter, Dafeng Hui, and S. Keith Hargrove led the students through the conference and presentations.

NNSA Awards Research Grant to College of Engineering

NASHVILLE (TSU News Service) –The College of Engineering at Tennessee State University was one of 22 Historically Black Colleges and Universities and six Department of Energy sites to recently receive part of a $4 million grant from the National Nuclear Security Administration.

The funding launches NNSA’s new Minority Serving Institution Partnership Program, a consortium program organized to build a sustainable Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics pipeline between DOE plants and laboratories, and HBCUs.

The partnership program is designed to enrich the STEM capabilities of HBCUs in a sustainable manner that aligns with the broad interests of DOE sites and emphasizes the entire career pipeline. The partnership also provides STEM students with the cutting edge resources and technology housed at DOE facilities, ultimately increasing STEM student retention.

“Hands-on participation in research is imperative for students in the STEM field,” said Dimitri Kusnezov, NNSA’s chief scientist. “The MSIPP will provide an opportunity for students to be exposed to state-of-the-art facilities and research, creating an opportunity to expand their knowledge and further prepare them for a career in STEM fields.”

The College of Engineering will benefit from this funding with research in nano-materials.  In partnership with the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, the College will begin to examine ways to better engineer materials for capturing energy, more specifically; using platinum-based nanostructures. Research has demonstrated catalytic activity to harness energy for multiple applications, including fuel cells.

Led by Dr. Lizhi Ouyang, Assistant Professor of Physics, a team of undergraduate and graduate students will conduct experiments to advance the knowledge of catalytic novel materials, particularly in platinum-based battery research.  These efforts support the research agenda of the new TIGER (TSU Interdisciplinary Graduate Engineering Research) Institute, to advance research in cyber-security, computation, nano-materials and renewable energy systems.

“An interdisciplinary approach to address and solve problems in science and engineering is critical to shortening the product development cycle from laboratory to commercial use,” said Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, Dean of the College of Engineering and Director of the TIGER Institute. “We are promoting STEM faculty to do more collaboration and aggressively pursue opportunities that exist with federal laboratories and industry to enhance the quality of our academic curriculums for our students at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.”

The College of Engineering also recently continued a partnership with Boeing to further research of aircraft systems, providing nearly $600,000 worth of funding, and received a $300,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to promote research in applied mathematics and curriculum development.

The National Nuclear Security Administration was established by Congress in 2000 as a separately organized agency within the U.S. Department of Energy, and is responsible for the management and security of the nation’s nuclear weapons, nuclear nonproliferation and naval reactor programs.

College of Engineering Partners with Boeing to Further Research of Aircraft Systems

NASHVILLE (TSU News Service) – The College of Engineering at Tennessee State University is continuing a decade-long partnership with the Boeing Company when it was recently announced that Boeing would provide nearly $600,000 worth of funding for the College to help address some of the aircraft challenges facing the company.

Boeing recently approached the College about additional capabilities of the faculty, receiving three research projects to help solve some key issues within the organization, with each project having the potential for continuous funding after the first year. The three projects complements the renewal of the Boeing Aircraft Seat Design Project of $280,000, with a total funding award of $589,000.00.

“The opportunity for academia and industry to collaborate to solve industrial problems makes the company more competitive, and enhances the quality of our engineering programs for students and faculty,” said Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, Dean of the College of Engineering.

The three research projects the college will be involve in include using artificial intelligence for the development of aircraft propulsion controls; developing resilient control mechanisms to mitigate cyber attacks in engineering embedded systems; and developing mathematical models for energy harvesting and storage.

“These grants represents the dedication of the faculty for research, and their commitment to enhance the programs in attracting students to the College of Engineering,” added Hargrove. “Our 10-year relationship has resulted in the hiring of graduates, student internships and co-ops, and research projects that develops faculty expertise and student knowledge.”

This is the second grant in as many months received by the College of Engineering. Back in September, several faculty members from the Department of Mathematical Sciences were recipients of a $300,000 research grant to promote research in applied mathematics and curriculum development. The grant was the result of a collaborative proposal submitted by the faculty members and funded by the National Science Foundation.

TSU Integrates College of Engineering with Community and Industry Needs

NASHVILLE (TSU News Service) – Since arriving to Tennessee State University in 2009, Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, Dean of the College of Engineering, has remained focused on growing the College of Engineering in research activities, student achievement and resource development to contribute to the needs of the state of Tennessee to produce more engineers.

As an alumnus of TSU in mechanical engineering, he has worked in industry and as a researcher at three major federal research laboratories.  He decided to pursue a career in academia to continue to impact and grow the number of underrepresented groups in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) occupations, such as engineering. As the state of Tennessee struggles to attract and produce more STEM professionals to grow a more educated workforce, he believes academic institutions must continue to play a major and strategic role to meet this urgent and important economic challenge.

Recently, Dean Hargrove discussed the mission of the College, its future and how it serves the community and the state.


TSU News Service: How old is the College of Engineering?

Dean Hargrove: The Division of Engineering was established in 1948, and has emerged for more than half a century to include several engineering and technology programs. It was changed to a School of Engineering in 1951, and graduated its first student in Civil Engineering a few years later.  The School of Engineering was one of six original engineering programs established at an HBCU (Historically Black College & University).  The school later added electrical, mechanical and architectural engineering.  In some respects, our engineering program represents the historical significance of the founding of TSU as “Tennessee Agricultural & Industrial State Normal College”.

TSU News Service: What are the current programs in the College of Engineering?

Dean Hargrove: The College of Engineering now has four accredited engineering programs that offer Bachelor of Science degrees: Architectural, Civil, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering.  We have the only accredited engineering programs at a public university in Middle Tennessee.  We also have an accredited program in Computer Science, Aeronautical & Industrial Technology, and recently added Mathematical Sciences.  The college provides a graduate degree for working professionals (Master of Engineering), and the Master of Science, and unique PhD degree in Computer & Information Systems Engineering (CISE).  This program helps prepare graduates for careers in systems engineering with the defense industry and the IT field.

TSU News Service: What kind of research initiatives is the College pursuing?

Dean Hargrove: The College of Engineering has been engaged in several emerging research areas.  More specifically, with recent research grants and contracts in cyber-security with the Air Force and the Department of Homeland Security, we are developing solutions relative to detecting cyber attacks within the cloud environment, and with mobile phones.  Other research is being conducted in sensor networking, robotics, intelligent health monitoring, transportation systems, environmental remediation, and aircraft seat design with organizations such as Boeing, Army Research Laboratory, EPA, Rolls Royce, and the Tennessee Department of Transportation.  Our research activities enhance our undergraduate programs via laboratories and faculty expertise.  We recently opened a new laboratory to focus on research themes promoted by the National Academy of Engineering and supported by the National Science Foundation.

TSU News Service: How is the College involved in the community?

Dean Hargrove: TSU has a long history of community service and civic engagement.  In fact, it is part of our motto “Think – Work – Serve”. The College of Engineering is collaborating with the Pencil Foundation to support schools such as Stratford Magnet STEM High School.  We are assisting them with the development of a simulation and gaming laboratory, and working with the middle school STEM Preparatory Academy (charter school) to help with tutoring and mentoring students.  We are also part of the Go-Green Nashville Initiative to promote energy efficient homes, and Hands-On Nashville.

TSU News Service: What are the future goals for the College?

Dean Hargrove: Our goals are consistent with the strategic initiatives of Tennessee State University.  We want to continue to provide access to students from diverse communities, promote academic quality, enhance our research funding that complements our curriculum, and be engaged with improving our quality of life.  The College also promotes gaining a global education with its study abroad program. We had several students go to China, Korea and Germany during this past summer. We also want to expand our facilities in the future to increase enrollment and partnerships with local businesses and other academic institutions.  As employment opportunities grow in healthcare, Information Technology, and manufacturing in the automotive industry, we plan to continue to prepare graduates with the necessary skills in programming, critical thinking, and innovative technologies to help industry grow within the state and make them more business competitive.  It is also critical that we continue to support the state’s STEM Initiatives in K12 and higher education.

TSU’s Department of Mathematical Sciences Receives $300K Research Grant

NASHVILLE (TSU News Service) – Several faculty members from the Department of Mathematical Sciences in the College of Engineering at Tennessee State University are the recipients of a $300,000 research grant to promote research in applied mathematics and curriculum development.

The grant is the result of a collaborative proposal submitted by the faculty members and funded by the National Science Foundation.

The project entitled “New Curriculum and Undergraduate Research in Applied Mathematics at TSU” is under the direction of Drs. Dorjsuren Badamdorj, Ghan Bhatt, Patricio Jara, Sandra Scheick, and Martene Stanberry, and will develop a new applied mathematics program and increase interdisciplinary undergraduate research activities in STEM fields at TSU.

“This grant represents the dedication of the faculty for research, and their commitment to enhance the curriculum in attracting students in mathematical sciences,” said Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, Dean of the College of Engineering.

The goal of the project is to develop and implement an applied mathematics program, which is designed to fill the gap between mathematics and other STEM areas, and includes four objectives:

  • To develop new applied mathematics courses and curriculum,
  • To institutionalize a new concentration in applied mathematics for the B.S. in mathematics,
  • To enhance the educational and research experiences of STEM students through, classes, summer workshops, and seminars in applied mathematics, and
  • To increase the amount of mathematics majors at TSU by 10 percent.

The three general components of the project are curriculum development, a university wide seminar series, and summer research workshops. As a part of the curriculum development, at least five new courses in applied mathematics will be developed, implemented, and integrated into the existing mathematics curriculum. The main objective is to equip STEM students with a strong background of fundamental mathematical tools enabling them to specialize or diversify as opportunity and initiative allow.

New technologies will be available to enhance the teaching and research capacity of the University, including a state-of-the art computer laboratory with parallel computing capabilities. The seminar series will expose the entire undergraduate population to various interdisciplinary research topics in STEM fields in order to motivate students to pursue STEM majors and careers by providing a challenging and exciting seminar series through selected motivational speakers. In addition, students will learn about internship and career opportunities.

The summer research workshops will be held at TSU and will be offered to undergraduate students in STEM departments at TSU and other HBCUs.

The five-week long research program will be divided into two main components; training and research.

Three weeks will involve training and will consist of in-depth lectures necessary to understand the proposed research topic and to provide hands-on training on computer software. The last two weeks will give students and opportunity to work in teams and on proposed research projects under the supervision of the organizing mentors.

Read more on the College of Engineering and the educational and research opportunities.

33 Future Scientists, Engineers Complete 5-Week TSU STEM Summer Program

NASHVILLE (TSU News Service) – Thirty-three prospective college freshmen, with interests in agricultural sciences, biology, chemistry, computer science, mathematics and engineering, Friday completed a five-week summer residential institute at Tennessee State University, intended to give them a head start on their college work.

The students, all recent high school graduates from Tennessee and some from as far as Texas, Illinois and Michigan, participated in the combined Engineering Concepts Institute (ECI) and the HBCU-UP/STEM Rising Freshman Summer Institute, funded by a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant.

Describing the program as a “boot camp” for STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) majors, Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, Dean of the College of Engineering, said it was intended to improve the students’ chances in college as well as give them a jump-start on their course work.

“Studies have shown that students who participate in pre-college programs have a much higher chance of graduating from college than those who don’t,” Hargrove said, referring to the students as “unique with a higher potential to be successful in their academic career.”

State Rep. Brenda Gilmore, who served as guest speaker at the closing ceremony, told the students that “America needs you” to fill the gap created by the shortage of manpower in the STEM areas.

“If our nation must succeed in technology, engineering, math and science, then you must prepare yourselves for the challenges of the 21st century by being the best at whatever you do, and more focused and determined to achieve at your very best,” she told the students.

The lawmaker lauded the parents for “steering your children in this” direction.

“They could have been somewhere else,” she said. “But you saw it fit to support their dreams by ensuring that they engaged themselves in something more meaningful that will not only enhance their college work, but also ensure their success in life.”

She added, “Making the grades must come along with other responsibilities. Be civil minded. Participate in voting or someone who does not have your interest at heart will decide your fate.  Volunteer, that’s one way of getting to where you want to go. Emulate people who are going somewhere. And above all, believe in God as you face the forces in your life.”

Future cardiologist Matthew Kennedy, 18, a recent graduate of Cane Ridge High School in Antioch, Tenn. (with 3.8 GPA), said not only did the program prepare him “for what’s ahead,” Gilmore’s speech provided an added motivation for him.

“This summer program gave me a strong academic boost in math, physics, chemistry and computer science,” said Kennedy, who plans to major in biology at TSU. “The speaker also has made me even more determined.”

Dr. Orville Bignall, Associate Professor of Physics and one of the instructors in the ECI/STEM summer program, is not surprised that participants are motivated and feel more confident.

“This program provided the students with the basic tools they need to be successful,” he said. “It took out the fear usually associated with physics, and gave them the tools to navigate the tough science courses.”

According to Dee Green, Coordinator of the ECI and HBCU-UP/STEM Summer institutes, all but three of the students who participated in the program have already committed to attend TSU for the fall semester.

“We hope to get the others to commit by the time school opens,” she said.

TSU leads consortium of colleges to China

NASHVILLE (TSU News Service) – The U.S. college population is about 18 million students.  Reported by the Institute of International Education in 2009-10, only about 270,604 participated in any type of study abroad program. These students take advantage of learning not only outside the classroom…..but outside their country of residence.  Their educational experience is enriched by a more global perspective, lifestyle appreciation in the U.S., respect for other cultures and people, and indeed become better decision makers in their respective disciplines.

Students from Tennessee State University recently returned from a study abroad experience to China.  Now recognized as the second largest economy on earth, it was a returning summer visit to this populous country with an amazing ancient history, a nationally directed plan for economic growth, and several industrial enterprise zones that serve as a catalyst for rapid development and urbanization.

TSU led an entourage of five universities (TSU, University of Memphis, Dyersburg, Pellissippi, and Volunteer State Community Colleges) on a four-week study abroad experience as part of the Tennessee Consortium of International Studies, commonly known as TnCIS. The participants were a highly diverse group in gender, race, and academic disciplines.

The first week established a basic level of learning in the language and culture of China. Instructors guided the students through credit earning courses in Sociology, Philosophy, and Logistics & Manufacturing, while being engaged in a foreign environment to complement the knowledge content of their coursework.  The intense curriculum had students immersed in a cultural environment to learn about Chinese history, relationships, international business, and competitive technologies through industry and plant visits.  Thus, several state universities have also established international initiatives on their campuses and abroad.  Within the Tennessee Board of Regents system, the University of Memphis and MTSU have innovative programs with countries in Asia, Europe, and on several other continents.

However, according to the Institute of International Education, almost 80 percent of the U.S. study abroad participants are white and include a large majority of females.  The 8th Conference Forum on Education Abroad has issued a call for more student diversity in study abroad programs, and is encouraging more programs like TnCIS to reach out to community colleges and four-year colleges to diversify the pool with more welcoming strategies that may traditionally hinder some groups from an international experience.

Expanding international education in “all” disciplines can help invite more students and promote awareness of the employment value and marketability of a study abroad experience.  Providing financial support and student organizations are excellent tools for advocating the benefits of international travel.

As Tennessee State University celebrates a century of existence and educating thousands of graduates, its mission of “Think-Work-Serve” extends beyond the shores of the United States with service learning activities, multi-cultural immersion, and providing a value-added education through its study abroad programs in Asia, Europe, South America and Africa.  Though African Americans composed less than 5 percent of the 270,604 students that participated in a study abroad experience in 2009-10, TSU has responded to the call by the Forum on Education Abroad to recruit more underrepresented groups for international travel.

In particular, the College of Engineering at TSU has sponsored several engineering students with foreign visits to Brazil, Germany, Korea and China over the last few years. More minorities are participating in these programs, but these numbers can be increased by more engagement by HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges & Universities) and recruiting at majority institutions.

Creating and expanding study abroad programs through partnerships with international universities, faculty exchanges, scholarships, and organizations that promote global experiences, are strategies to further provide all Tennessee college students with a quality education that rivals other states, and positions us with a larger residential workforce pool of global-educated employees.

TSU Alumna Returns as Fortune 500 Executive-on-Loan

NASHVILLE (TSU News Service) – Patricia Brewer Hairston has landed a “rare” opportunity to give back to her alma mater. The 1977 graduate of Tennessee State University, an executive at Corning Incorporated, a Fortune 500 company, will be working at TSU for one year as an “executive-on-loan” funded by Corning.

As the Corning executive-on-loan, Hairston will work closely with TSU leadership to advance the goals of the Supply Chain Management Program and other leadership initiatives at the institution. “This is an opportunity that I cherish,” Hairston said. “I always wanted to give back to Tennessee State University, and this is certainly a way to do so in a more meaningful way.”

Hairston, director of Global Transportation and Trade Compliance at Corning, currently chairs the TSU Supply Chain Management Program Governing Board, a leadership group of nine leading Fortune 500 companies that collaborate and work with the University to review curriculum, lead research, and develop students for future leadership in supply chain management. She has been a member of the board since 2006.

TSU President, Dr. Portia Holmes Shields, called Corning “a forward-thinking company” for assigning Hairston to TSU where she can have a direct impact on the development of future supply chain management professionals. “We are thrilled to see her return to us so capable and a more strengthened graduate with a level of technical and executive expertise that can only be helpful to Tennessee State University,” she said.

According to Hairston, Corning, the world leader in specialty glass and ceramics, has already hired two TSU students and hires interns from the supply chain program annually. “I appreciate the support of Corning for its foresight and the partnership with Tennessee State University, which is ensuring that TSU graduates are well trained and ready for the workforce.  We see the supply chain management program as a pipeline to recruit the best and brightest from this university, and I am glad to be a part of this effort.”

Hairston, who earned a bachelor’s degree in Architectural and Civil Engineering from TSU, said her assignment has been a “valuable” experience that has given her the opportunity to reconnect with her alma mater. She was particularly thankful to Dr. Festus Olorunniwo, chair of the Department of Business Administration at TSU, for his effort in getting her back to TSU.

“We first met at a supply chain conference,” Hairston said. “When he realized that I was a TSU graduate, he invited me to join the Supply Chain Board, which I did not give much thought to at the time, but he insisted and followed up with calls and I finally agreed to join. Since then, I have attended every board meeting except for two because of previously planned engagements. Overall, this has been a very rewarding experience.”

Dr. Olorunniwo described Hairston as “an experienced and dedicated professional with a strong commitment” to give back to TSU. “As chair, she has ably led the body in ensuring the growth of this program, and has helped in proving internship and job placement opportunities for our supply chain students,” he said.

Hairston, who will also work with the president of TSU in an advisory capacity, has received high commendation from the Vice President of University Relations and Development, Dr. William Nelsen, with whom she has been working closely. “TSU is very fortunate to have an executive of her caliber and qualification to be assigned to this institution,” he said. “We look forward to her leadership on important projects that would advance this university.”

At Corning, where she has been since 1999, the TSU-trained engineer has held several key positions, including director of International Procurement and Transportation, leading and facilitating the growth of Corning’s outsourced manufacturing capability in Asia. Before that she served as director of Global Strategic Sourcing, where she led a $3.1 billion company spending initiative, while instituting other cost-cutting measures. Prior to joining Corning, Hairston worked for Westinghouse as manager of international procurement, commodity centers manager, and as the IT procurement manager.

Hairston is in her third year as chair of the Tennessee State University Supply Chain Management Program Governing Board. The Mobile, Ala., native is married to Robert J. Hairston. They have five children.

Telecommunications Pioneer to Deliver TSU Commencement Address

NASHVILLE (TSU News Service) – Jesse Russell, Chairman and CEO of incWORKS, and recognized as the father of digital cellular technology, will speak at Tennessee State University’s 2012 commencement ceremony, Saturday, May 5. The annual celebration will take place at 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. in the Gentry Center.

Trained as an electrical engineer at Tennessee State University and Stanford University, and recognized globally as a thought-leader, technology expert and inventor in the field of wireless communication, Russell has played a major role in shaping the wireless communications industry direction through his visionary leadership and innovative perspectives for standards, technologies as well as innovative new wireless service concepts.

Russell is currently Chairman and CEO of incNETWORKS, a Broadband Wireless Communications Company focused on 4th Generation Wireless Communications Networks and Technologies. He has nearly three decades of professional experience in directing Research and Development of pioneering technologies, products and services related to the communications industry with Lucent Bell Labs, AT&T and currently incNETWORKS.

Russell received his Bachelor of Science Degree in Electrical Engineering from Tennessee State University in 1972 and his Masters Degree in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University in 1973. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of the IEEE, and a Fellow of the International Engineering Consortium. In 1980, Eta Kappa Nu selected Russell as “The Most Outstanding Young Electrical Engineer of the Year” under the age of 32. He has more than 75 U. S. Patents to his credit in the Communication Engineering field.

He is also an internationally recognized Wireless Communications Consultant in the area of Advanced Broadband Wireless Technologies and emerging broadband wireless 3G and 4G product strategy, as well as a consultant in regulatory and spectrum strategy. In addition, Russell consults on wireless standards related issues such as RF health and safety matters as well as Cellular Communication Industry Standards.

The commencement addresses will be free and open to the public. The College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Science; the College of Education; and the College of Liberal Arts commencement ceremony begins at 9 a.m. The ceremony for the College of Business; College of Engineering; College of Health Sciences; and College of Public Service and Urban Affairs will be held at 2 p.m.

For more information call 615.963.5331 or visit www.tnstate.edu/records/commencement/.

College of Engineering Hosts STEM Leadership Conference

NASHVILLE (TSU News Service) – The College of Engineering at Tennessee State University will host a STEM Leadership Conference April 26-28. The conference will take place in the Research and Sponsored Programs Building and the Farrell-Westbrook Complex.

This year’s conference will feature guest speakers by industry and engineering leaders during the three-day conference. A series of seminars will be held Thursday, April 26 for College of Engineering students and include:

  • STEM Leadership Topic
    Research and Sponsored Programs Bldg Lobby
    8-8:25 a.m.
  • Who is a Global Engineer
    RSP Room 163
    8:30-9:20 a.m.
  • Entrepreneurship
    RSP Room 163
    9:25-10:15 a.m.
  • Automotive Technologies
    RSP Room 163
    10:20-11:10 a.m.
  • Lunch with Guest speaker Jeff Buchanan
    President’s Executive Dining Room
    11:20 a.m.-12:50 p.m.
  • Personal Branding
    RSP Room 163
    1-1:55p.m.
  • Cloud Computing
    RSP Room 163
    2-2:55 p.m.
  • Preparing for Professional Exams
    RSP Room 163
    3-3:55 p.m.

On Friday, April 27, the conference Awards and Recognition Banquet takes place at the Farrell-Westbrook Complex (The Barn) 6-8 p.m. Milton Woods, TSU alumnus and engineer consultant, will be the guest speaker.  The conference closes Saturday, April 28 with the Engineering Alumni Summit from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. in the Research Sponsored Programs building, room 209, and Student picnic beginning at noon on the Boswell Lawn.

For more information, contact Kevin Williams, Engineering Undergraduate Program coordinator at 615.963.5879 or kwilliams41@tnstate.edu.