All posts by Emmanuel Freeman

TSU President Glenda Glover says university focused on student success, no longer a ‘school of last resort’

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – TSU President Glenda Glover says the university is focused on student success, and is no longer a “school of last resort.”

logoThe president was part of a panel of educators, community and business leaders that spoke at a Black History Month luncheon on Feb. 8 organized by Cable Nashville, a leadership organization for women’s professional advancement.

The theme of the event was “Leadership Vision in Challenging Times.” Besides Glover, the panel featured the presidents of Nashville’s other historically black higher education institutions: Fisk University, Meharry Medical College, and American Baptist College.

Glover said, as an HBCU, Tennessee State has always opened its doors to all students, even those rejected by other institutions. But she said the university has shifted its focus “exclusively” to student success.

“Excellence remains our top priority, but we can’t be the school of last resort,” Glover said.

In October, Glover announced that TSU is raising its admission standards and enhancing student success initiatives to increase retention and graduation rates. Beginning this fall, all students must have a 2.5 GPA and a 19 on the ACT for admission to TSU. The previous admission scores were 2.25 or a 19 on the ACT for in-state students, and a 2.5 or 19 ACT for out-of-state students.

“The day is over when you can call and say, ‘I have a good student with a 1.9 GPA and has promise,’” Glover said. “Well, this may not be the time you want to apply to TSU. We are raising standards because I believe that quality attracts quality.”

Janet Rachel, a member of Cable and a 1977 graduate of TSU, attended the luncheon. She said she fully supports Dr. Glover’s “bold” decision on student success and the spike in admission standards.

“I believe that at the core of helping blacks succeed is not just education but quality education,” said Rachel, who is the talent acquisition manager for diversity relocation and career navigation at Vanderbilt University. “I am really glad about what I am hearing from Dr. Glover. I hope the alumni will step up and become more engaged and more involved.”

The other HBCU presidents on the panel were Dr. James E.K. Hildreth, Meharry Medical College; Dr. Forrest E. Harris, Sr., American Baptist College; and Frank Sims, Fisk University.

Susan Allen Huggins, president and CEO of Cable, said it was important to bring the HBCU presidents together because of the partnership and the important role their institutions play in the community in terms of diversity and molding minds.

“We (Cable) were founded because of our strong understanding of and belief in the importance of diversity and inclusion,” Huggins said. “The Nashville community wouldn’t be what it is without these historically black institutions and the tremendous contributions they are making.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Graduate is New Mr. Clean

Courtesy: The Tennessean

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State graduate Mike Jackson cleans up pretty well.

So well in fact, that he was selected to replace the iconic cartoon character Mr. Clean.

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Mike Jackson is also featured in a limited edition  Mr. Clean Calendar. (Courtesy photo)

The folks at Procter & Gamble decided that after 59 years on the job the powerful-looking Mr. Clean, with his white pants, skin-tight T-shirt and single golden earring needed some time off.

So they held a contest to find a fill-in, and Jackson, who graduated from TSU in 2003, was selected from hundreds who submitted audition videos to fill Mr. Clean’s white shoes.

Jackson made his debut during the activities surrounding Super Bowl LI in Houston.

“I’m a big football fan so being at the Super Bowl is pretty incredible,” said Jackson, who spent the week on radio row in his Mr. Clean garb doing interviews for the product. “I was really excited when I heard that would be my first duty as Mr. Clean. I can’t wait to see what else they have in store for me the rest of the year.”

A 30-second Mr. Clean commercial aired during the Super Bowl. It was the first time the product has had a Super Bowl spot.

Jackson played high school football in Atlanta and attended every TSU home game while he was there, which included an undefeated regular season his freshman year.

“It was great following TSU because we had really good teams,” said Jackson, who majored in marketing and now works in sports marketing.

Jackson was joined on radio row throughout the week by Denver Broncos linebacker DeMarcus Ware, who was tabbed the “black Mr. Clean” last year when he appeared on “The Tonight Show” because of his clean-cut appearance after the Super Bowl.

Ware has been associated with Procter & Gamble in the past.

Not only is Jackson muscle-bound with a slick bald head, much like the original Mr. Clean, but he also offers diversity to the brand.

Jackson also is featured in a limited edition Mr. Clean calendar.

TSU’s Tameka Winston Named 2017 Women of Influence Award Winner

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Dr. Tameka Winston, interim chair of Tennessee State’s Communications Department, has been named a 2017 Women of Influence Award winner by the Nashville Business Journal.

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Dr. Tameka Winston

Recognized for inspiring and mentoring students, Winston is among 32 honorees chosen for this year’s award, which will be presented at a luncheon on Wednesday, Feb. 8, at the Omni Nashville Hotel.

The Women of Influence Awards honor women who lead and make it a priority to give back, to encourage and to inspire.

Past winners include Nashville Mayor Megan Barry, Tennessee House Speaker Beth Harwell, and Jacky Akbari, employer services director of the Nashville Career Advancement Center.

“It is a great feeling to be recognized with so many successful women in Nashville,” Winston said.

Winston’s passion for education and for inspiring students has earned her a number of accolades. She was a finalist for the 2016 Nashville’s Emerging Leaders Awards sponsored by the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce and YP Nashville. The award recognizes professionals younger than 40 who have made significant accomplishments in their chosen field and contributions to the community.

Nashville Lifestyle Magazine also named Winston one of Nashville’s 25 Most Beautiful People in 2016.

In 2015, she received the Woman of Achievement Award at the 35th Annual Women in Higher Education in Tennessee conference. Winston was also named College of Liberal Arts Professor of the Year for the 2015-2016 academic year.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

More than 300 TSU Students, Volunteers Participate in MLK, Jr. Day of Service

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is continuing the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with an MLK Day of Service.

On Saturday, Jan. 21, more than 300 TSU students and volunteers participated in various projects around Nashville that included working with kids, assisting elderly residents, packing food, painting and hanging photos.

The MLK Day of Service at TSU is organized each year by the Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement to give students, faculty and staff an opportunity to celebrate King’s legacy through service.

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TSU students Courtney Couser, left, and Cochilla Wright move boxes at Madison Middle School on MLK Day of Service. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

The center was one of six organizations to receive federal and matching funds two years ago from the Corporation for National and Community Service to mobilize volunteers to honor King’s memory through service projects.

“Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. believed in service, and this initiative falls in line with not just his belief, but TSU’s motto – Think. Work. Serve,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. “We’re proud that TSU was selected as one of six institutions to help lead this national service project.”

Like the other institutions, TSU mobilizes students and community volunteers to take on projects around the city.

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TSU students and volunteers clean the playground at Grace M. Eaton Child Care and Early Learning Center. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Barbara Dudley, a senior economics and finance major, was one of about 25 students who cleaned windows, sanitized chairs and shelves, moved trash and cleaned the yard and the parking lot at Grace M. Eaton Child Care and Early Learning Center on Saturday.

“It feels really good to give back,” Dudley said. “I have always had a passion for service and for children and to be able to help at a day care just makes it more meaningful for me.”

Mahalia Howard, the executive director of the center, agrees.

“I think it is wonderful for young people to give back to the community,” she said. “What they are doing for us here today is a blessing because we are a non-profit. We don’t have the funds to pay for the things they are doing. What they are doing is helping to support at-risk students.”

In La Vergne, Tennessee, more than 30 volunteers performed various chores for elderly residents at AHEPA 343, an independent living apartment complex for seniors. They cleaned living areas, moved trash, hung pictures, and moved furniture.

Linda Tynan, 68, a six-year resident, who just needed company, was moved to tears by the students’ willingness to help.

“I think its terrific to see these students take up their time to come and lend a hand to people they don’t even know,” Tynan said. “What they are doing today might not seem much to them, but I appreciate every minute of it.”

Dr. Linda Guthrie is the director of the Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement. She said the MLK Day of Service is one of the most exciting events the center has ever undertaken.

“It is an honor to lead 11 other HBCUs throughout the southeast region of the country in serving our communities,” she said. “We should feel challenged and act on the challenge to do something good every day to make a difference in the lives of others.”

“We want people to realize that Dr. King’s holiday is not just a day off,” said Shirley Nix-Davis, director of a youth empowerment program at TSU and one of the MLK Day of Service project directors. “But it’s an opportunity to serve, and continue serving throughout the year.”

For more information on the MLK Day of Service, contact the TSU Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

18 Graduate From TSU New Management Training Program

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is making sure all its employees holding management positions are proficient in their areas.

On Jan. 12, TSU President Glenda Glover presented certificates to 18 managers who completed the first in a series of management training programs aimed to bring participants up to speed on university processes and procedures.

The 10-week, 30-hour management-training program is for recently hired middle and senior management staff and others who have been in their positions for less than two years.

Glover said the program is part of the university’s effort to ensure excellence in all areas of operation.

“This effort is geared toward ensuring that we have continued improvement in staff performance, which is so important on our campus,” Glover said. “I am proud of all of the participants and I look forward to the level of productivity that comes with this training opportunity.”

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University officials and staff attend a reception in the President’s Dining Hall for participants in the university’s new management training program. (Photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

Linda Spears, associate vice president of Business and Finance and director of Human Resources, said a focus group of representatives from all divisions came up with the curriculum and topics for the training program after meeting for three months.

“This is something we felt we needed and so Human Resources responded,” Spears said.

She said the intent is to acclimate new managers and administrators to TSU because many of them are not aware of certain operational procedures and processes.

“I would say that participants’ skill levels have certainly increased with this training,” Spears said.

Adrienne Frame, director of budget, has been at TSU for four years but became a director a year ago. She said the training opened her eyes to many things she didn’t know before.

“I learned a lot that I didn’t know going in as a supervisor,” Frame said. “I feel much more prepared as a new supervisor.”

Spears said the management-training program will be offered twice a year, in the fall and spring.

Among those receiving certificates were Dr. Lucian Yates, dean of Graduate Studies and Research, who started at the university in July; and Dr. Coreen Jackson, who assumed the role of interim dean of the Honors College about a year ago.

Others were: Phyllis Danner, director of Research and Sponsored Programs; Natasha Dowell, employment manager; Peggy Earnest, chief of staff in the Division of Student Affairs; Dr. Cheryl Green, assistant vice president of Student Affairs; Albert Hill, director of Business Operations, Facilities Management; Dr. William Hytche, executive director of Residence Life; Angela Jackson, associate registrar; and Valencia Jordan, associate director and senior women’s administrator.

Also receiving certificates were: Arlene Nicholas-Phillips, executive assistant to the president and liaison to the TSU Board of Trustees; Ben Northington, assistant director of fiscal accounts; Julius Proctor, area coordinator of Residence Life; Sonja Revell, Student Affairs coordinator for programming and mediation; Sheila Riley, director of Enrolment Services; Bradley White, associate vice president for Financial Services; and Valerie Williams, associate director for Learning Services.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University part of cutting-edge research aimed at reducing cancer disparities

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – This holiday season, cancer survivor Navita Gunter has a lot to be thankful for, mainly her life.

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Navita Gunter

But she’s not content with her own personal survival. Understanding her own struggle when she was stricken with cervical cancer several years ago, and finding little compassion and help, Gunter has vowed not to let that happen to another woman.

“My struggle gave me purpose and compassion for others,” she said.

Gunter, founder of the Cervical Cancer Coalition of Tennessee, has joined TSU as head of the community advisory board for a four-component cancer research project at the university.

The U54 Partnership to Eliminate Cancer Health Disparities, refunded recently by the National Cancer Institute for another five years, is a coalition involving TSU, Meharry Medical College and Vanderbilt University. Its goal is to create a model for eliminating disparities in cancer through education, prevention and treatment.

The components of the project are community outreach and engagement, smoking cessation, breast cancer awareness, and cancer research education.

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Mariam Boules, a senior biology major, works in Dr. Margaret Whalen’s research lab. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“The intent of this award is to reduce health disparities,” said Dr. Margaret Whalen, professor of chemistry, who heads the cancer research education component. “The specific disparities we are looking at is the disparity between the vast majority of people and certain groups, like African American, in terms of cancer incidence.”

Whalen’s role, she said, is educating students to get them interested in doing cancer research to try to broaden the number of individuals who engage in cancer research.

“If we have more people from different backgrounds engaging in cancer research who are able to understand and deal better with the disparities, they will be more interested in trying to address the situation.”

Although there has been substantial progress in cancer treatment, screening, diagnosis, and prevention over the past several decades, addressing cancer health disparities—such as higher cancer death rates, less frequent use of proven screening tests, and higher rates of advanced cancer diagnoses—in certain populations is an area in which progress has not kept pace, according to the National Cancer Institute.

Documented cancer health disparities include substantially higher rates of prostate cancer incidence and death among African American men than men of other racial/ethnic groups; and higher rates of kidney cancer among American Indian and Alaska Natives than other racial/ethnic groups.

Mariam Boules is Dr. Whalen’s student and a senior biology major with minors in psychology and chemistry. She said exposure to the cancer research has been enlightening.

“The research is teaching me a lot of new things,” Boules said. “Having to do hands-on in the lab for about eight hours a day and enjoying the stuff you are doing and learning about; all those compounds and how they affect our system and our cells is just amazing.”

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Dr. Rebecca Selove

In the case of smoking cessation, TSU scientists are looking at tobacco use and the health disparities it presents, especially the incidence of lung cancer death rate among African-American men.

“Our role at TSU is the design of behavioral intervention,” said Dr. Rebecca Selove, a clinical psychologist and research associate professor, who heads the smoking cessation component of the project. “This entails telling people about the program, and giving them information in general about how important it is to get that support if they are tobacco users.”

Selove said the intervention would be designed along with the Cancer Outreach Corp, and would involve counseling people about cessation and motivating them to sign up and stick with the program.

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Dr. Oscar Miller

Dr. Oscar Miller, chair and professor of sociology, heads the outreach component. He coordinates and maintains the activities of the community advisory board, which is comprised of experts in government and community organizations, whose mission is to help reduce cancer disparities and also to disseminate cancer research findings and information.

“One of the things we do is look at the researchers, or the research that is ongoing, and try to find community partners who have some expertise in that,” Miller said. “We meet about four times a year to discuss upcoming research projects, new areas of research, and help the researchers at the three institutions on how to include the community findings in their research.”

Gunter is excited about the cancer research, and what the future holds.

“The TSU project has expanded the research effort in this area and helped me touch more people than what I was touching before,” she said.

TSU’s involvement in cancer research, in particular, is far-reaching. Recently, renowned cancer specialist and TSU alum, Dr. Edith P. Mitchell, was part of a panel that made recommendations to help speed the development of cancer cures.

The Blue Ribbon Panel of scientific leaders and cancer patient advocates was formed to provide direction for Vice President Joe Biden’s National Moonshot Initiative, which aims to make more therapies available to more patients, while also improving efforts to prevent cancer and detect it at an early stage.

“As members of the panel, we were able to take what we know from experience and working with cancer research to come up with these recommendations, which we are certain will help the vice president in his work,” Mitchell said.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Dr. Edith Mitchell, Noted Cancer Specialist, TSU Graduate Named to Biden’s Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Renowned cancer specialist and TSU alum, Dr. Edith P. Mitchell, is part of a panel that recently submitted 10 cutting-edge scientific recommendations to help speed the development of cancer cures.

Mitchell, clinical professor and director of the Sidney Kimmel Center to Eliminate Cancer Disparities at Thomas Jefferson University, served on the Blue Ribbon Panel of scientific leaders and cancer patient advocates named to provide direction for Vice President Joe Biden’s National Moonshot Initiative.

President Obama announced the $1 billion initiative as part of his State of the Union Address in January and named Biden to head it. The Moonshot aims to make more therapies available to more patients, while also improving efforts to prevent cancer and detect it at an early stage.

In September, Mitchell’s panel submitted their report, with recommendations aimed at the Moonshot goal of making 10 years of progress in five years.

“Serving on the Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel is one of the most exciting things that has occurred in my career,” said Mitchell, who is also outgoing president of the National Medical Association. “As members of the panel, we were able to take what we know from experience from cancer and working with cancer research to come up with these recommendations, which we are certain will help the vice president in his work.”

The panel recommended that the Moonshot consider the following:

  • Establish a network for direct patient involvement
  • Create a clinical trials network devoted exclusively to immunotherapy
  • Develop ways to overcome resistance to therapy
  • Build a national cancer data ecosystem
  • Intensify research on the major drivers of childhood cancers
  • Minimize cancer treatment’s debilitating side effects
  • Expand use of proven prevention and early detection strategies
  • Mine past patient data to predict future patient outcomes
  • Develop a 3D cancer atlas
  • Develop new cancer technologies

Mitchell, a retired Air Force brigadier general, is one of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam’s nominees for Tennessee State’s University Board of Trustees.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

More Than 500 Graduates Receive Degrees at Tennessee State University Fall Commencement

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – More than 500 received undergraduate and graduate degrees Dec. 10 when Tennessee State University held its fall commencement in the Howard C. Gentry Complex on the university’s main campus.

Prominent civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump gave the keynote address.

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A participant in the TSU fall 2016 graduation ceremony peruses the commencement program as she waits to receive her degree. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

He told the graduates that with their degrees they have the foundation to chart any course in their lives.

“Many of you graduating today already have solid foundation from your upbringing,” Crump said. “With your graduation today, Tennessee State University has added value to that foundation that will determine your path and success in life.”

Crump is the noted Florida lawyer who represented the families of Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, and Terence Crutcher in police shooting cases that made headlines around the world. Crump was also an advocate in the Robbie Tolan police brutality U.S. Supreme Court case, as well as the Martin Lee Anderson boot camp death case.

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More than 500 graduates participated in TSU’s fall 2016 commencement in the Howard C. Gentry Complex on Dec. 10. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

“You graduates are the very best that we have to offer. You are the hope of your grandfathers and grandmothers,” Crump said. “Like many before you, your are going to face situations you cannot control. But the only thing you can control is your attitude and your perspective at how you are going to address whatever situation you find yourselves in.”

On social justice, he referred to the graduates as “the fortunate ones” with the moral obligation to stem out injustices and abuse in their communities.

“You’re the ones who are going to have the good jobs, you have the education, you have the talent, and if you don’t speak up for our community, if you don’t stand up for our community, if you don’t fight for our community, then who will,” Crump said.

Jeremy Johnson, who received a bachelor’s degree in history and political science, was touched by Crump’s assertion about abuse and injustice.

“His speech is a wake-up call to action,” Johnson said. “There is so much injustice around us everyday but many of us do nothing and behave as if everything is fine.”

TSU President Glenda Glover described Crump’s speech as “thought-provoking and very inspiring.” She congratulated the graduates for their accomplishment.

“You have endured and prepared yourselves to reach this goal which may have seemed unattainable, but you stuck with it,” Dr. Glover said. “You must always remember that you did not accomplish this goal all by yourselves. There were parents, relatives, friends and mentors who helped you along the way. Remember to thank them.”

Ravyn L. Morgan, a criminal justice major, was recognized for graduating summa cum laude, with the highest grade point average. She was presented with the Student Academic Excellence Award for her accomplishment.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Master of Science in Nursing Program Ranked No. 2 in the Nation; Highly Qualified Faculty, Flexible Schedule, Low Tuition Cited

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The graduate nursing program at Tennessee State University is among the best in the nation.

top-masters-in-healthcare-administration-best-schools-2016-264x300In a recent survey, the TSU Master of Science in Nursing degree was ranked No. 2 among the 50 Best Graduate Nursing Schools in America.

Top Master’s in Healthcare Administration, which conducted the ranking of 2016 Best Schools, said flexible scheduling, highly qualified faculty, and extremely reasonable tuition were factors that helped TSU to achieve the high ranking.

All of the TSU MSN programs – Family Nursing Practice, Holistic Nursing, and Nursing Education – are offered day and evening on campus, as well as online. Students may also choose to attend part-time or full-time, with an option to attend summer sessions to accelerate their pace.

“We are extremely excited about this high ranking,” said Dr. Maria Revell, director of the TSU MSN program. “It has taken a lot of hard work on the part of faculty, staff and students to get this program to where it is. We are extremely delighted about this national recognition.”

Currently, 314 students are registered in the TSU MSN program, making it one of the largest concentrations and student success programs on campus, Revell said.

The program has a 98 percent job placement rate for those who complete the program, she said.

“We have done course revision, we work closely with students, we have an open door policy, we have faculty who are available, accessible and who work online, and on the phone with students,” Revell said.

Kai-L Cobb will graduate from the program during TSU’s fall commencement on Dec. 10. A registered nurse for five years, she earned her bachelor’s and associate’s degrees in nursing at TSU, following in her mother’s footsteps. She said strong academic offerings and faculty/student relationships are major factors.

“One thing that really makes us successful in this program is our access to faculty,” Cobb said.  “The office visits, after-hour communication and access to my teachers through emails and phone calls, really help me, especially with my work schedule.”

Meaghan White, who will also receive her MSN degree during the fall commencement, said it is a good feeling to say, “ I graduated” from the second best graduate nursing program in the nation.

“That is a wonderful feeling to be able to say that; it’s an awesome feeling,” White added.

The high ranking of the MSN program comes on the heels of another recent major achievement for TSU.

The Wall Street Journal listed the university among its top 10 historically black colleges and universities.

The WSJ/THE College Rankings, which put TSU at No. 10, was released Nov. 21 and used categories such as academic resources and graduate outcomes to determine rankings.

For more information on the TSU MSN program and all other programs in the College of Health Sciences, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/health_sciences/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Hosts 90th Birthday Bash for Former Administrator Homer R. Wheaton

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University had a birthday bash for one of its noted sons: Homer R. Wheaton.

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TSU President Glenda Glover was among former colleagues, students, friends and family of Homer Wheaton, who packed Jane Elliott Hall Auditorium to honor the former TSU administrator. (Submitted photo by Grant Winrow)

Under the theme, “Everybody Loves Mr. Wheaton,” the university hosted a formal reception in a packed Jane Elliott Hall Auditorium on Dec. 9 with family, former colleagues, students and friends to honor the man many refer to as “an instrument of change.” Wheaton turns 90 on Dec. 19, which TSU has declared Homer Wheaton Day.

“The fact people feel this much about me to hold such a wonderful reception in my honor is just a great feeling; I am just grateful,” said Wheaton, surrounded by his wife, Vesta; son, Kevin; and daughter Rise Wheaton Pope, and their families.

“This institution has made such a tremendous contribution to the life that I ended up having. I never would assume that I would have had the life that I had, to be able to meet and help a lot of people to achieve success. This is something I feel good about. I have a very strong commitment to helping people.”

Over a span of nearly 50 years, Wheaton served TSU as director of Field Services and Extension, special assistant to former TSU President Walter Davis, director of Financial Aid, and vice president of University Relations and Development.

As part of the Dec. 9 celebration, the university launched the “$90 For Ninety Scholarship Fundraiser” in support of Wheaton’s continued philanthropic endeavors at the institution.

TSU President Glenda Glover, a TSU alum, touted Wheaton’s generosity, which she said made it possible for her to stay in school when her parents could not afford her semester tuition. She referred to Wheaton as a “servant leader and legend at TSU, who is caring, trustworthy and giving.”

“Wheaton’s name rings success among students,” Glover said. “His name is synonymous with student success. So, today is indeed a special moment in the history of our institution, as we pay tribute to a man who epitomizes love for TSU. He has touched the lives of so many.”

As director of financial aid, Wheaton did not only help thousands of students secure funding to attend TSU, he personally helped students to thrive and succeed, said Grant Winrow, special assistant to President Glover and director of special projects.

Winrow said Wheaton’s “tough love” helped him stay on track as a student at TSU.

“Mr. Homer Wheaton is the definition of a legend in higher education,” said Winrow, who spearheaded the effort to honor Wheaton. “He is legendary in the sense of how many people he’s impacted.”

Gospel legend Dr. Bobby Jones, a TSU alum and former professor, was among those who paid tribute to Wheaton.

“I have known Homer Wheaton for years because we worked at the same institution,” Jones said. “I had to come to show my support today.”

While Wheaton will always be known for supporting and encouraging students to stay in school, many credit him for his sense of persuasion that led to the recruitment of legendary football coach John Merritt, and subsequently placed TSU on the world map for its winning ways.

It is reported that when Merritt would not accept President Davis’ offer of the coaching position, Davis gave Wheaton the assignment of influencing the coach to accept. With Homer’s intervention, Merritt did not only accept the offer, but along came Joe Gilliam, Sr., and Alvin Coleman, Sr., as part of Merritt’s staff. Gilliam and Coleman would become legends themselves.

“Influencing John Merritt to accept the position of head football coach at the university is one of my favorites stories,” Wheaton said in a 2006 interview for TSU Alumni Life magazine. “During the next 20 years that Merritt was our football coach, we did not have a single losing season. He won many national championships and established records with respect to the number of players drafted by the NFL.”

To contribute to the Homer R. Wheaton Scholarship Fund, visit: http://www.tnstate.edu/alumni/wheaton.aspx.

Department of Media Relations

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About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.