Georgianna Priddy retiring from TSU after 48 years of service

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – After working at Tennessee State University for nearly 50 years, Georgianna Priddy is saying goodbye.

The university saluted Priddy at a special event on Thursday, Feb. 23. Her final day is Feb. 28.

Dr. Curtis Johnson, TSU’s chief of staff and associate vice president for administration, salutes Georgianna Priddy at her retirement ceremony. (photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

“We appreciate the service she’s given to Tennessee State; commitment and dedication,” said Dr. Curtis Johnson, TSU’s chief of staff and associate vice president for administration. “You don’t find very many people who remain for that length of time at one institution anymore.”

Forty-eight years ago, Priddy started at TSU as a cashier. She held that position for about seven years before becoming a postal clerk in the university’s post office, and eventually supervisor of mail services, where she will finish her career.

Postal clerk Danielle Rhodes worked with Priddy for more than 40 years, and says she’s definitely going to miss her.

“She’s been a great boss, but more than anything, she’s been a special friend,” said Rhodes.

Priddy said she’s enjoyed working at Tennessee State, but that she’s looking forward to having some time off after working two jobs most of her life.

“If I wasn’t here (TSU), I was on the other job,” said Priddy, adding that she really wants to spend some quality time with her new great great grandson.

“I want to take some time and just enjoy home for a moment; enjoy my family,” she said. “I plan to do some reading, travel some.”

Jerry Priddy said he’s happy for his mother, who has been a motivating factor in his life. The 49-year-old double amputee said his mother was his biggest cheerleader when he decided to return to TSU after more than 30 years and get his degree. He said her smile was the first thing he looked for when he got his diploma at last year’s spring commencement.

“She’s done so much for so many people,” Jerry Priddy said. “I’d like for her to go on a vacation, and have someone wait on her.”

Mother Priddy said she’s proud of the educational success of her son and daughter, Michelle Vaughn. In December 2015, Vaughn and her daughter both received degrees in psychology from TSU.

“One of the most rewarding things, was to see both of my children graduate from TSU, and be the best that they can be,” she said.

Priddy said she hopes her three grandchildren will also attend TSU.

“I want them to carry on the tradition,” she said. “If I had it to do over again, it would be at TSU.”

Department of Media Relations

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With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at